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Discussion Starter #1
"Nature abhors a stock Ducati." :D

A work in progress. I've so far:
  • replaced the FT seat with the Comfort Seat for a little more legroom and a flatter shape so I can move around more.
  • replaced the stock mirrors with CRG bar end mirrors.
  • added G2 Throttle Tamer and smooth ProGrips.
  • added the Icon model's rear fender (black).
  • removed the ugly and heavy stock license plate support structure from the swing arm.
  • installed the EVOTech tail tidy to hold the license plate.
Next up:
  • reprogram ECU with the Rexxer unit to eliminate lean surge at low end.
  • change sprockets from 15/46T to 16/45T (9% taller gearing)
  • replace stock handlebars with narrower and lower Rizoma bars
  • replace stock clutch and brake levers with CRG adjustable levers
  • replace stock headlamp with JW Speaker adaptive LED headlamp
  • replace stock turn signals with Rizoma IRIDE LED turn signals
  • de-sticker frame
  • strip off stock tank badges
  • add carbon fiber front fender
  • add trim strip to edges of rear fender
  • add trim to tank
  • install new badges to tank panels.
  • install brackets for Classic soft bags.
  • consider exhaust modifications...
It's already looking much more to my liking with that ugly license plate bracket on the swing arm gone, the new seat, and the new rear fender with the license plate mount in the right place...









onwards!
G
 

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Gone the other way - just put an FT seat on my Icon. Probably no more comfortable than stock but better lines I reckon. Anyways, that's what sheepskins are for.
Also picked up a couple of CRG LS ripoffs for 10% of the genuines. They are quite good for the price.

Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #3
An hour with a bottle of Goo Gone, a roll of paper towels, a rag and a bucket of soapy water last evening: The left side of the motorcycle is now decal and tank-badge free … Well, I left the decal on the swing arm for the moment, ran out of time. It will be gone tonight. ;-)



Right side next …
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Another hour and the rest of the stickers are gone, both sides.

Four out of five came off extremely easily, all in one piece. The other took a bit of fussing over ... but it's the one on the frame member behind the hot exhaust pipe, so I imagine it gets 'baked' in place pretty quickly.

Now I can put the tank badges and trim I want on the bike into place. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The de-yellowification has been completed.

The last yellow on the bike was the stripe on the front fender. Well, I couldn't resist a little Duc bling: A bare CF front fender from The Carbon King in the UK was only about $100. The amuzing fact that the Duc's fender is so tiny that it wouldn't matter if it were CF or plastic, and it's so small as to be totally ineffective anyway, so what the heck? It's purely for style. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm in the middle of a combined set of things to do ... fit the lower, narrower Rizoma MA006B bars, re-route the control cables and electrical to suit, and upgrade the headlight and turn signals to better, brighter LED systems. The new headlight and its much simpler, prettier to my eye mounting brackets will afford a lot more space for routing the controls cables properly. But dang, it's tough to work with all these things with the tank in the way, particularly since you need access to the electrical wiring tightly jammed and zip-tied together under the tank behind the steering head. I decided that I would prefer to remove the tank to do this work...

The tank's fuel line connections are reputed to be a little fragile, and I don't want to break anything, so I ordered the little special tool to help unhook the fuel line connections to the tank. That should be here today. Meanwhile I hadn't yet worked at positioning the bars and the fit of levers, switchgear, throttle, etc yet. So that was yesterday's task.

The Rizoma bar has a handy scribe line right down its center so it's easy to center it in the clamps. I disconnected the clutch cable and assembled the clutch lever, switch cluster, and a cardboard tube to simulate the length of the grip along with the CRG bar-end mirror on the left hand side. There's enough straight section on the bars to fit all of that comfortably. On the right, however, the limits of clearance with this set of handlebars is determined by the length of the master cylinder and the stock position of the instrument panel. I kinda like the asymmetry of the stock position of the instrument panel, and if I want to keep that, there's just enough clearance to fit the brake cylinder, switch cluster, and throttle control if I mount the CRG mirror on the bar-end adapter mount, off the bar itself, and rotate the brake hose connection a bit.

Rizoma also makes a set of taper-bar risers with a center mount for the instrument panel to replace the stock setup. That provides a LOT more clearance, but I'm not sure I want to go that way just yet. It might be the right thing to do, however. Decisions, decisions...

I then set the bike up on the axle mount bobbins and rear paddock stand so I could get onto it with my feet on the pegs and work out the correct positioning of the handlebars (the Abbas super bike stand has to be fitted with the footpegs partially folded up so I had to switch stands...). With a few minutes of fussing about, the bars were set near where they ought to be and I tightened down the retaining clamp to spec. All the controls are in their correct positions, loosely assembled to allow for final positioning when I've got the cable routing done. I put the bike back on the Abbas super bike stand ... it's much more stable than the paddock stand.

Next: Remove tank, remove stock headlight and turn signals, install LED headlight and turn signals, route cables and electricals, do final adjustments, fit left grip, test everything, re-fit tank, test everything again. At that point I have an operable motorcycle again. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Well, the little special tool for removing the fuel lines from their spigots on the tank arrived. I battled with the damn things for two hours trying to get the fuel lines freed, unsuccessfully. What a FornicatinG pain in the butt these fuel line connections are!

However, after two hours of trying to get enough room to get in there and slowly tugging on the vent hoses and stuff, there was enough room to get to all the hidden and annoying zip ties buried deep into the frame members so that I could clip them and free up the wiring harness. I could now snake the connections for ignition switch and turn signals out. At that point, I abandoned taking off the tank and just let it sit there propped up by a block of wood. The goal was to remove the darn headlight and re-route cabling, not mess with the tank, after all.

The headlight then came off easily enough—although some of the routing and design ideas for cable guides, etc, really do perplex me... Electrical harnesses don't willy-nilly run around and break themselves, they don't need to be fastened down every three inches of their run to keep them securely in place. They just need to be routed cleanly so that things don't rub and tied together to keep them neat. Freekin' Ducati ... they either over-do things or they only half-assemble things. For example, all the headlamp assembly bolts were barely finger tight.

Anyway, with the headlight and that ugly surround thing out of the way, I re-routed the clutch cable and reconnected it to the lever, it now fits with the new handlebars perfectly, and moved around the brake hose and throttle cable as well. I re-routed the ignition switch back to its junction under the tank. All ready to test the LED turn signals and install the new headlight, but out of time...

I laid the electricals back into place and tucked the clutch cable back where it belongs, then eased the tank back into place and bolted it down lightly. Ignition turned on normally ... hmm? A whiff of fuel vapor. Then I look down and there's a bit of gasoline dripping onto the ground. Arrgh. Turn off the ignition, take the bolts out of the tank, lift it up again. And DAxN but one of the stupid fuel connections underneath hadn't just popped out of its receptacle just to mess with me. Another twenty minutes fussing the piece of crap back into place snugly, refitting the tank into position, and switch the ignition on again ... No further leakage, I started the bike's engine for the first time in two weeks and listened to it run for a bit while watching to see if any more fuel leaks would spring. Nothing. Sounds lovely, the little bastid.

Put the bolts back into the rear of the tank, fitted the seat, and locked it up. Cleaned up the mess and put my tools away. Carried it all upstairs. Now for a shower and dinner.

Maybe work on it again tomorrow. :D

onwards!
G
 
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