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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey all!

I've been lurking on this and the other Scrambler forum for a couple of months getting loads of inspiration. I was looking at getting a new bike, and a mate picked up a second hand Sixty2. The size felt just right to me, so I went out and got a new 2019 Icon in the EOFY sale.

I'm loving it so far (unfortunately with limited riding due to COVID lockdown), but there's plenty I've been wanting to change, and some things I've changed already. So here's a thread details out the progress!

For the uninformed, the 2019 has some slight variations to previous models. You can read reviews about stuff like the ABS cornering, but things that are perhaps more important to the aesthetic eye are things like nicer black levers, a better instrument panel, and a black engine.

I'll put up progress pics as I go along. There seems to be a few different things on the 2019 model that aren't mentioned anywhere, so hopefully this can help!

So far, I've done the following mods:
  1. Installed a tail tidy (Competition Werkes Fender Eliminator Kit)
  2. Replaced front indicators (Rizoma Leggera)
  3. Replaced rear indicators (Rizoma Corsa)
  4. Blackened out headlight trim and outer heatshield.
Other mods in store are:
  1. New mirrors
  2. New bars
  3. Axle guards
  4. Engine guard
  5. black out the handlebar risers
  6. New paint job
  7. New decals
  8. New seat and side panels (already bought off Mugello)
  9. Termi Race exhaust (bought when I bought the bike, to be installed at my first service)
Here's a bit of feedback so far.

Installing the tail tidy & rear indicators

I haven't really done any mechanical work in the past, but this seemed to be an easy one to start with. After buying a set of allen and torc keys, I went to work. Part of this kit is to keep the OEM plate light. That turned out to be a pain in the arse. On the 2019 Icon, the wiring for this light feeds back on the inside of the swingarm, up in front of the interior of the swingarm, and then up through the right side with the rest of the wiring. Unlike previous models, this wire isn't zip tied - it's got dedicated attachments to the swingarm itself! With COVID lockdown in place, I was doing this in my shared apartment garage, so couldn't raise the bike or anything.

There are a total of three of these clips: one on the inside side of the swingarm (just below where the number plate extension arm was attached) one at an "8 o'clock" position at the front of the swingarm squeezed against the cat, and the final one on the upper front of the swingarm near it's water plug (?) above the cat. All of these were incredibly hard to get to with the cat and rear wheel attached. After about 20 minutes working on the first one, I realised that it was a small allen screw with a firm ribbon-like plastic loop that the wire fed through. I didn't like the idea of leaving the screws in there, and tried getting them all out, but in the end I got some clippers to the loops instead.

If you're doing this mod, don't waste your time on saving this light - just get a new (better) one. The OEM one has a hood, and due to the angle of the plate it hardly illuminates the plate at all. I'm going to get a knife to it and see if that helps.

After that, the rest of the installation was straight forward. For both front and rear, the Rizoma indicators needed mounting adapters (FR231B), as well as 2 sets of Scrambler-specific wiring kits (EE079H). The wiring kits simply plug into the light attachments so they have the Ducati plug on them.

I used two different models for the front and rear intentionally for visibility purposes. Turns out one has a matte black finish, the other gloss. Luckily they're so small!

IMG_20200717_141959.jpg IMG_20200717_132631.jpg IMG_20200717_161619.jpg


Front indicators

I thought this was going to be a bit daunting, as I read about having to remove the tank, but in practice it was easy. I had a bit of foam lying around from the indicator packaging, so after unbolting it I used that to prop it up about 10cm.

There where two challenging parts here. First was feeding the wire through from the left indicator. I'm not sure if there was any logic here, but there seems to be a big cluster of cabling coming down the middle (from the control panel I assume) and the indicator wire has to cross over that. It's all super tightly jammed in. This is probably easy with two people, but COVID meant I was doing it along. I found the trick was to not pull out the old indicator wire, and use that as a guide by jiggling it. The actual connectors are all labeled clearly. Due to the clip on the end of the OEM indicator I thought I might do some damage trying to yank it out, so I clipped it.

The other challenge was attaching the adapters. This was simply a space constraint. I'm a big guy with big hands, and you need to attach a nested washer and nut on the inside of the adapter with what seems like 2-3cm of space. Holding the nut in place while trying to get the spanner on it seemed impossible! But got there in the end. Unfortunately the nut seems to be a little deep on these and slightly thicker than the adapter itself. This means it doesn't have a super flush finish when installed, but not a deal breaker.

IMG_20200720_170102.jpg IMG_20200720_180011 (1).jpg IMG_20200720_171850.jpg



Paint job

This was my first crack at spray painting metal, and I give myself a B minus. After a couple of coats of heat-proof primer, a used a medium-heat resistant black matte spray (up to 180 degrees Celsius). It seems like the heatshield doesn't actually get all that hot, maybe because of the reflector tape underneath. This was going well except for one damn blast of wind (was spraying outside) that sank a little bit of grit into the primer. Looks fine for the most part, but might revisit it later if I want a factory-finish.

IMG_20200801_163246.jpg IMG_20200801_163605.jpg IMG_20200801_162118.jpg



What's next?

We're in a hard lockdown here in Melbourne, Australia, so that means no riding, and no retail. However, I've got some Rizoma axle guards (front: PW200A and rear: PW219A) as well as some cheap eBay mirrors to install. I went with some cheap bar-end ones for now (A$20), as these ones are also able to clip to the bar itself. This way I can test out what position - and style - I like most.

I also have some engine/frame guards ready to install, the Rizoma "B-Pro" (PW219A), but this needs some things like a torch wrench, so will wait until after lockdown so I can work with some mechanically minded friends on that one. Sidenote: the one I have is actually the very last unit from the factory! For some reason they have stopped making it.

I'll update this thread as I go along. Here's a Photoshop composite of the look I'm going for. The logo is based off an old mid-century Ducati radio, that I drew up in Illustrator. I've got it already from the vinyl cutter, but need the wrest of the bike wrapped grey first.

Interested to hear people's thoughts!

45488
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I seemed to hit a post limit there, but can add more pics later if wanted
 

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I like the grey wrap idea, nice PS work as well. Interesting how your VIN plate is an actual riveted plate, in California it's just a sticker. These bikes are so much fun to mod and make your own, enjoy!
 

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Love what you are doing! (y)

Please keep posting as you go along, also what snags / problems you hit along the road. I got my Icon about 2 weeks ago, built Jan 2020, so far the weather has been foul so not much riding, but plenty of scheming as to what to mod. Parts and accessories here in Vietnam are not that easy to come by and can be quite pricey, but is it such a nice bike to mod. Got to try :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Today I attached the Rizoma axle protectors and de-stickered the frame (exept for the VIN as dunchooby pointed out is riveted on). I also removed the fork reflectors which aren't a requirement where I live.

Parts and accessories here in Vietnam are not that easy to come by and can be quite pricey, but is it such a nice bike to mod.
Gandalf I find all these parts are expensive anywhere outside of Europe or the USA. There's at least a 50% markup if I want to by them in Australia compared to the Euro RRP. I've been getting them straight from some guys called Carpi Moto in Italy. The remove the VAT for overseas orders, and heaps of the parts are with free shipping (even to the Southern Hemisphere where we are!). They're also pretty helpful, like chasing down that engine guard part and getting the last one.
 

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Hi tiltos,

Thanks for the tip, I will definitely look them up. Here the situation is similar, with exception whatever you find is at least 50% than RRP. Generally importing your own is a bit cheaper and you can get what you want, but it takes a looooooot of patience. I am currently waiting for my Roadlok to arrive. It was shipped out of the US on 27/07, arrived in Saigon on 30/07 but to date is still AWOL somewhere in a customs shed in Hanoi. USPS can't help as they hand it over to VNPost and VNPost blame customs and Covid-19. Bloody brilliant... Anyway, the time waiting for stuff means I can spend more time looking around for what I want to do.

Cheers,

Gandalf.
 

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Today I attached the Rizoma axle protectors and de-stickered the frame (exept for the VIN as dunchooby pointed out is riveted on). I also removed the fork reflectors which aren't a requirement where I live.



Gandalf I find all these parts are expensive anywhere outside of Europe or the USA. There's at least a 50% markup if I want to by them in Australia compared to the Euro RRP. I've been getting them straight from some guys called Carpi Moto in Italy. The remove the VAT for overseas orders, and heaps of the parts are with free shipping (even to the Southern Hemisphere where we are!). They're also pretty helpful, like chasing down that engine guard part and getting the last one.
FTR - I've used these guys a few times too. Cheapest prices I could find for a few cosmetic upgrades (mirrors, tail-tidy etc). They delivered in good time to me in Sydney and I wouldn't hesitate to buy more stuff of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Update: Vinyl

Unfortunately our postal service has grinded to a halt with lockdown, so am still waiting on quite a few things. However, I've made a couple of calls. I tried underbar mirrors, and while the visibility was superior, they're just far too low. Now waiting on some rizoma-knockoff bar-ends from eBay. I'm also going to replace the bars, stock handlebar clamp and gauge bracket - but not with the Rizoma gauge relocator. You'll have to wait and see for that ;)

I asked around greater Melbourne for some quotes on the vinyl wrap. Besides getting quite a few non-responses, the quotes I got back ranged from A$1000 to A$1700. Stuff that! So I looked online and bought some Avery Dennison vinyl (the good stuff) and equipment. All up that cost about $180 delivered. I bought enough to do the bike thrice over, just in case I stuffed up bad.

So far I've done both fenders. It's a tedious job, but not as difficult as it's led out to be. It probably took me 30 minutes on the rear fender, and an hour on the front.

Now for the tank dilemma. I've been umming and arring about using a heat gun near the tank, and whether to empty the tank or not, or try and remove it. Ultimately I think the heat gun will be fine on low temp (my one has a temp control, and can go as low as 60*C - that's a hairdryer on medium heat). That'll be enough to stretch the vinyl but not cause a danger.

However, given the safely issues, I don't think I'll be able to post-heat, which 'cures' the vinyl in place. To make up for this, I'll just ensure it's got a good inch extra that's tucked in under the tank. Would love to hear other opinions on this, as my internet search suggests nobody really knows, and also that the Scrambler tank is a nightmare to remove.

I'm waiting on a new fuel cap to replace the stock one, but when that arrives I'll wrap the tank. Progress pics attached
 

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Vinyl part 2: the tank

So yesterday I decided I was ready to take on wrapping the tank, and install the new fuel cap whenever it arrives.

Man, it's a laborious job! I now know why the quotes were so high: they had 'pain tax' applied.

It took a little over 3 hours to wrap the tank itself. I'm yet to do the panels, but will soon. Besides the general laboriousness of working with vinyl, I had serious issues when it came to the inside of the 'lip' of the tank indents. While vinyl can stretch, it doesn't shrink. I'm guessing there may be tricks that professional wrappers use, but I couldn't get it down without some form of creasing. The other issue is that while I wrapped it in once piece, there was a huge amount of excess at the rear of the tank. I solved this by making a cut at the pointy end of the tank panel. It's actually hidden pretty well.

Overall, I think the wrap looks good, and definitely does the job for a daily ride. On close inspection, you can see it's shortcomings: there's some imperfections in the vinyl itself, which are like micro-creases that the heat gun couldn't remove; there's the creasing/bubbling within the tank panel insert (mainly hidden by the panel); and the aforementioned seam line at the rear.

Given the alternative options would have cost at least $800 extra though, I'm happy with how it turned out.

Tank panels

I'd taken the panels down in preparation to wrap them as well, but realised that with my current skill level I'm not going to be able to wrap them when attached to the tank.

Looking for advice here: is there an easy way to remove and attach the panels?! When I took them off I nearly pulled the bike over getting panel's metal 'tooth' loose from its rubber housing. To put back on, I figured it was easier to attach the rubber housing on the tooth before inserting it on the tank, but it still seems near impossible. Maybe some WD-40 will do the trick... Either that or I simply remove the rubber entirely and replace it with a piece of foam or something more pliable.

As always, photos attached. I'll wrap the panels in the next couple of days and apply my custom decal. The decal won't cover the screw hole, so I'm going to cut out a vinyl 'cap' to cover it, then blast the decal on top.

Edit: I forgot to mention, I put on the bar-end mirrors as well - here they are on ebay. They're great! Plenty of visibility and in easy glance-view. The downside is they already make the massive bars even wider. These are attached with bar-ends they were supplied with, which while they have a nice 'cap' at the end, don't have the best attachment inside the pipe (the stock Dominos had a plastic clamp, these are a thick aluminium). Once I get my new bars I'll be mounting these directly onto the bar, so the width won't be an issue.
 

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Vinyl part 3: panels

Quick update here. Just did the panels, and they were a breeze. They took about 5 minutes each. Helped immensely that I did them in my study and blasted the heater, making the vinyl nice and soft. Installing the panels back on was much easier with a spray of WD-40.

The decal is a bit bigger than I anticipated, but I think it still works. For those keeping tally, that cost me $60 from these guys. They were helpful and actually got what I was trying to do, unlike some of the cheaper providers (who kept rejecting me because the design was 'white on white').

To cover the screw, I made cut some extra circles of vinyl and stuck it over the top. Obviously you see the indentation, but it hides the shiny screw head well.

On the downside, since the weekend the vinyl behind the tank has bubbled out a bit more. It's not noticeable for an onlooker, but you look directly down in those gaps from the cockpit. I'm not sure if I will get a scalpel to it (which'll probably scratch the black paintwork), or hold off until after summer and just redo the whole tank (6 months away).

Overall though, happy with it! It definitely gives it a bit of individuality, and I much prefer the colour to the candy yellow.


Next up (when they eventually arrive): new bars, risers and gauge holder!
 

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Thanks guys, I'm happy with the progess so far.

The handlebar finally arrived in the post today. I got the risers a while back from MXStore for $45. I liked the offset of the gauge so didn't want the to do the Rizoma relocation. I also think the gauge looks weird sitting on top of the tank like that.

So what's the solution? This gauge bracket from Gilles Tooling would be perfect, and €30 isn't bad. The catch? Shipping was €195!! The only other solution I could find was this one from Thailand, but to be honest it looked a bit shit. Luckily for me, I've got a mate living in Berlin, so he helped out and bounced the parcel forward. Shipping to him was a much nicer €6.90!

I'm still waiting on that in the post, along with a V-Drill guide from Amazon (I grabbed the last one at a reasonable price it seems), but can't wait to swap these bars out.

I placed them side-by-side for a quick comparison. The riding position won't change much, but it'll be so much nicer just to have the bars a little more compact!
 

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Rizoma Fuel Cap

After spending two weeks sitting in a Melbourne Post depot, this finally arrived. Easy to install, just take off the existing cap, remove the OEM alloy cap, and the new aluminium screw holder behind, reaffix, then screw on the face.

Damn is looks good! The cockpit is going to look mint once the new bars and risers are in place.

I think it's all starting to come together now. Can't wait to replace the oem exhaust too, it looks like a chunky soda stream bottle :LOL:
 

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