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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys,

Just picked up my first Ducati and it's a 2020 DS. Reading such glowing reviews from most I thought this would be the perfect cruise around bike when I'm not on my KTM 350EXC in the woods. Well couple rides and little over 100 miles in (still in break-in) but I've ridden it at about 80% and to be honest I'm pretty damn underwhelmed. Overall, the bikes rides and performs decent but isn't near as polished nor as inspiring as I expected. Partially, I'm hoping I didn't make the wrong decision as it's one of the first bike's I've purchased without riding. For me, it will be 90% on road to cruise/hooligan around and grab a fire road if I see something interesting. Any other offroad excursions I have a dedicated dirt bike for that. I wanted more of a longer travel Supermoto bike.

Couple thoughts. The throttle is literally half asleep...maybe for some this is easy in the dirt but coming from years of dirt bikes making 50whp and weighing 230lbs this thing feels like a slug until about 6k rpm and full beans. Needless to say the throttle isn't linear whatsoever, I could barely time rev matching and downshifts at all. I read about the Cam A or B differences on other Scrambles but haven't seen any PN#'s posted. What's my best option here? Can I just buy the older gen more aggressive throttle tube/cam or which G2 Throttle system are people doing to cure this? I don't expect V4S throttle response but this is worse than my 1987 CM400...

The gear box is rather clunky. Tons of false neutrals between shifts and it doesn't like to quickly downshift when coming to a stop. It's a very careful 5-4-3-2-1 type of ordeal and trying to find neutral is hit or miss. Again, maybe spoiled as I find my KTM's gearboxes to generally be butter (did take a few hundred miles to loosen up). I've read some say this loosens up over time and some say switching oils definitely helps. I'm pretty surprised at how hard I literally have to shift this thing at times. Is this fairly common?

Lastly, performance - namely exhaust, emissions, and power. The exhaust I find to be super quiet and not letting out that classic twin soundtrack. That will need to definitely change quick as it feels far too plugged up. I've already noticed some backfiring and slight pops in decel at various revs as well. I have read this is due to smog pump/emissions. Does all this stuff need to be mechanically removed or does just a Rexxer tune take care of this? Any feedback on people that have de-smog/tuned theirs is appreciated.

I apologize if most of this has been asked prior, I've spent the last few days browsing the forum for answers and came up with few things but hoping for additional feedback. Thank you!
 

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Hello. I have a 2019 sled which I have owned for 8 months now and 5 of those it has been in the shop. One month of that is down to the virus lockdown where I live but the rest is down to clutch and brake problems. The brake issue - both front and back failed- has not been sorted yet but I can tell you about the clutch. you will hear a lot about the difficult gear changes and no neutral just being a Ducati thing, well it is but only because Ducati quality in the clutch they fit to this is shite. It took three replacement baskets to get one that was machined properly and that completely transformed the gear shift. I do, very very occasionaly get a false neutral between 5 and 6 but I think that is more down to a lazy shift than a gearbox issue. So the clutch can be sorted but it needs eyeballing the parts and setting up the oil feed to the clutch chamber. The throttle is very lazy and I find the engine needs 6k to behave. I find hunting at 4k. I too am underwelmed by the machine. There is lots of advice on here about how to improve the machine but I sort of feel it should have come as a gutsy, spirited bike with the fucking clutch and brakes working from the factory. Oh, and the indicators fill up with water if you drive in the rain and the rear mudguard is a triumph of design over function if you ride in the mud.
 

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Hello guys,

Just picked up my first Ducati and it's a 2020 DS. Reading such glowing reviews from most I thought this would be the perfect cruise around bike when I'm not on my KTM 350EXC in the woods. Well couple rides and little over 100 miles in (still in break-in) but I've ridden it at about 80% and to be honest I'm pretty damn underwhelmed. Overall, the bikes rides and performs decent but isn't near as polished nor as inspiring as I expected. Partially, I'm hoping I didn't make the wrong decision as it's one of the first bike's I've purchased without riding. For me, it will be 90% on road to cruise/hooligan around and grab a fire road if I see something interesting. Any other offroad excursions I have a dedicated dirt bike for that. I wanted more of a longer travel Supermoto bike.

Couple thoughts. The throttle is literally half asleep...maybe for some this is easy in the dirt but coming from years of dirt bikes making 50whp and weighing 230lbs this thing feels like a slug until about 6k rpm and full beans. Needless to say the throttle isn't linear whatsoever, I could barely time rev matching and downshifts at all. I read about the Cam A or B differences on other Scrambles but haven't seen any PN#'s posted. What's my best option here? Can I just buy the older gen more aggressive throttle tube/cam or which G2 Throttle system are people doing to cure this? I don't expect V4S throttle response but this is worse than my 1987 CM400...

The gear box is rather clunky. Tons of false neutrals between shifts and it doesn't like to quickly downshift when coming to a stop. It's a very careful 5-4-3-2-1 type of ordeal and trying to find neutral is hit or miss. Again, maybe spoiled as I find my KTM's gearboxes to generally be butter (did take a few hundred miles to loosen up). I've read some say this loosens up over time and some say switching oils definitely helps. I'm pretty surprised at how hard I literally have to shift this thing at times. Is this fairly common?

Lastly, performance - namely exhaust, emissions, and power. The exhaust I find to be super quiet and not letting out that classic twin soundtrack. That will need to definitely change quick as it feels far too plugged up. I've already noticed some backfiring and slight pops in decel at various revs as well. I have read this is due to smog pump/emissions. Does all this stuff need to be mechanically removed or does just a Rexxer tune take care of this? Any feedback on people that have de-smog/tuned theirs is appreciated.

I apologize if most of this has been asked prior, I've spent the last few days browsing the forum for answers and came up with few things but hoping for additional feedback. Thank you!
That's the issue, your purchased it without test riding.

Anyway the scrambler line-up, especially the 800 range is not what you're looking for as a "long travel supermoto".
In general the scrambler line-up is pretty sedate to ride and I've done some decent off-road single track on it. It's ok. But you can't compare it to an enduro bike. Come on mate.

They have a bike for what you're asking for: Hypermotard.
And yes, im sure you can take the Hyper on a decent fire-road. After all its going to be 90% on road as you've said.

As for the clutch; with time they tend to engage better. But 5th to 6th is always a hit and miss sometimes; even on their bigger bikes. I used to own a Multistrada DVT and the Diavel 1260.

As for the sound, a Scrambler 62 with a Termi race exhaust sounds as good as a "Harley". So I'm quite sure an aftermarket exhaust on the DS would solve your "problem".

Sounds like you bought the wrong bike for yourself/needs. Sorry to hear that mate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Hello. I have a 2019 sled which I have owned for 8 months now and 5 of those it has been in the shop. One month of that is down to the virus lockdown where I live but the rest is down to clutch and brake problems. The brake issue - both front and back failed- has not been sorted yet but I can tell you about the clutch. you will hear a lot about the difficult gear changes and no neutral just being a Ducati thing, well it is but only because Ducati quality in the clutch they fit to this is shite. It took three replacement baskets to get one that was machined properly and that completely transformed the gear shift. I do, very very occasionaly get a false neutral between 5 and 6 but I think that is more down to a lazy shift than a gearbox issue. So the clutch can be sorted but it needs eyeballing the parts and setting up the oil feed to the clutch chamber. The throttle is very lazy and I find the engine needs 6k to behave. I find hunting at 4k. I too am underwelmed by the machine. There is lots of advice on here about how to improve the machine but I sort of feel it should have come as a gutsy, spirited bike with the fucking clutch and brakes working from the factory. Oh, and the indicators fill up with water if you drive in the rain and the rear mudguard is a triumph of design over function if you ride in the mud.
Hmm that is not promising feedback. Now that I have spent more timing reading the forums and various reviews clutch/shifting/false neutrals are definitely a known issue. I can live with a bit of a notchy box but when you pay darn near $14k out the door for a bike I expect it to not shift like a tractor. I haven't came across the other issues you mention but I will keep an eye out. Personally, I did expect more from this machine but I generally have always had to do a few things to my bikes to really like them.

Your comment on a gutsy spirited bike exactly mirrors mine. I don't expect it to break any land speed records but it shouldn't be slow, have next no throttle response or power below 4k, and shift like an 18 wheeler. Also, I have been less than impressed with the brakes...I expect those to bed in a bit more as they have slowly gotten better once I put some heat in them. But my front makes an occasional grinding noise (loud) which I find to be odd.

Needless to say I like the bike and the styling and purpose REALLY called to me. Almost like a small ADV bike but more supermoto in size with the ability to have real fun on the road. So far I haven't found that to be the case. Which really confuses me since so many people and a number of editorial reviews absolutely rave about this machine. Granted I've had a number of bikes over the years and fairly high expectations I partially wonder how much experience on other bikes they have had or if I just got lucky and bought a factory turd.

That's the issue, your purchased it without test riding.

Anyway the scrambler line-up, especially the 800 range is not what you're looking for as a "long travel supermoto".
In general the scrambler line-up is pretty sedate to ride and I've done some decent off-road single track on it. It's ok. But you can't compare it to an enduro bike. Come on mate.

They have a bike for what you're asking for: Hypermotard.
And yes, im sure you can take the Hyper on a decent fire-road. After all its going to be 90% on road as you've said.

As for the clutch; with time they tend to engage better. But 5th to 6th is always a hit and miss sometimes; even on their bigger bikes. I used to own a Multistrada DVT and the Diavel 1260.

As for the sound, a Scrambler 62 with a Termi race exhaust sounds as good as a "Harley". So I'm quite sure an aftermarket exhaust on the DS would solve your "problem".

Sounds like you bought the wrong bike for yourself/needs. Sorry to hear that mate.
You know, I definitely realize that now but the dealer was being a bit sticky about test rides. I should have been more forceful on that before purchasing this guy. Not sure if that would have fully swayed my decision as it really took me a longer ride of about 75 miles yesterday to fully notice some of these nuances.

In terms of comparing it to my Enduro KTM I mainly meant in the terms of mechanical operation as a more premier offering. I would expect Ducati to have the same feel relative to some of it's competitors. Obviously the power to weight is a difficult comparison as is the throttle response. However, it seems so many complained about the earlier Scramblers throttles they really dialed this back so much so that for more experienced riders it's darn near dangerous. You don't have that linear response that is really required to adequately adjust the rear of the bike when needed. Of this main complaint it seems this is one of the easier ones to fix though.

I'm glad you mention the Hypermotard, I sat on both the 950 and SP version and REALLY looked at them. On road I expect you are spot on, they would be above and probably beyond what I would expect. I'm not sure I would attempt to take a bike like that offroad. I did really consider an 821 Stealth Monster as a pure on road fun cruiser but with my dirt background I gravitated towards a bike that could have fun on a gravel road every now and again.
 

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Hello. I have a 2019 sled which I have owned for 8 months now and 5 of those it has been in the shop. One month of that is down to the virus lockdown where I live but the rest is down to clutch and brake problems. The brake issue - both front and back failed- has not been sorted yet but I can tell you about the clutch. you will hear a lot about the difficult gear changes and no neutral just being a Ducati thing, well it is but only because Ducati quality in the clutch they fit to this is shite. It took three replacement baskets to get one that was machined properly and that completely transformed the gear shift. I do, very very occasionaly get a false neutral between 5 and 6 but I think that is more down to a lazy shift than a gearbox issue. So the clutch can be sorted but it needs eyeballing the parts and setting up the oil feed to the clutch chamber. The throttle is very lazy and I find the engine needs 6k to behave. I find hunting at 4k. I too am underwelmed by the machine. There is lots of advice on here about how to improve the machine but I sort of feel it should have come as a gutsy, spirited bike with the fucking clutch and brakes working from the factory. Oh, and the indicators fill up with water if you drive in the rain and the rear mudguard is a triumph of design over function if you ride in the mud.
Never heard about any brake issues with the front Brembo M4.32 caliper or the Rear brembo caliper. The M4 caliper has been around for a long time and is on many other brands of motorcycles; they've show to be reliable stoppers for years.

I've ridden my 2019 DS in some really heavy rain; never had the indicators fill up with water.

Sounds like you got a proper Friday afternoon bike.
 

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Hi Syumassh.
The rear brake went soft they said fluid contaminated because I had taken the bike off road! Then both brakes went soft. You tube vid here.
I suspect seals leaking to incorrect fluid but so far no explanation. If you look at the indicator lenses you will see drain holes molded in to lenses top and bottom. Other Scramblers seem ok, only the sled. Mine is a 18 model. Imbought aftermarket lenses but they were the same.
Never heard about any brake issues with the front Brembo M4.32 caliper or the Rear brembo caliper. The M4 caliper has been around for a long time and is on many other brands of motorcycles; they've show to be reliable stoppers for years.

I've ridden my 2019 DS in some really heavy rain; never had the indicators fill up with water.

Sounds like you got a proper Friday afternoon bike.
 

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Hi Syumassh.
The rear brake went soft they said fluid contaminated because I had taken the bike off road! Then both brakes went soft. You tube vid here.
I suspect seals leaking to incorrect fluid but so far no explanation. If you look at the indicator lenses you will see drain holes molded in to lenses top and bottom. Other Scramblers seem ok, only the sled. Mine is a 18 model. Imbought aftermarket lenses but they were the same.
I’m assuming it’s like that even after a re-bleed. If I were you I’d do a caliper rebuild (unfortunately now is not a great time to send it to a shop because of covid19).

I must admit mine was initially like that for the front, but after bleeding my brakes it became much better. Nothing like my other Ducati’s.

Also, the brake levers are adjustable. The further “away” from your hands, it tends to have better lever compression. That seems to be the case for mine. Try turning the click wheel such that the lever moves further away from the handgrip.
See if it still reaches that same amount of sponginess (temporary fix for now).
 

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Hi Syumassh.
The rear brake went soft they said fluid contaminated because I had taken the bike off road! Then both brakes went soft. You tube vid here.
I suspect seals leaking to incorrect fluid but so far no explanation. If you look at the indicator lenses you will see drain holes molded in to lenses top and bottom. Other Scramblers seem ok, only the sled. Mine is a 18 model. Imbought aftermarket lenses but they were the same.
have a look at this: Front brakes not holding pressure
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My brakes on mine seem good so far. They mainly were vague for the first 100 miles but since I have bedded them in they grab much better. I also purchased the older style pre-17 throttle tube so hoping that fixes my lazy throttle complaint.

I'd say the only two major complaints I have are the transmission is still a bit clunky with a number of false neutrals. I will see how this progresses and see if Ducati will take a look at this at my 600 mile service. Secondly, this seat is FAR from comfortable. I did about 3hrs of riding the other day and the backside was completely numb...this coming from somebody who had ridden KTM's for some time and they can't make a seat to save their life.

Now, without sounding like I'm complaining about the bike it's worth adding a few positives. The mid-range of this bike even with "only" 75hp is fairly impressive. Definitely could use some more power but for what it is this engine does well. I think the major surprise for me is the suspension. Ironically, this is something at 6'3 and nearly 200lbs most factory ergos/suspensions are a bit of a let down for me. Usually, I'm putting on custom WP, Ohlins, Fox, etc. on my bikes. However, the factory adjustable KYB suspension is one of the better I've ridden in recent memory and this bike works well for taller rides. Might not even change the bars...

Overall, I think with a few tweaks and aftermarket additions this will be a very fun bike.
 

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Hello guys,

Just picked up my first Ducati and it's a 2020 DS. Reading such glowing reviews from most I thought this would be the perfect cruise around bike when I'm not on my KTM 350EXC in the woods. Well couple rides and little over 100 miles in (still in break-in) but I've ridden it at about 80% and to be honest I'm pretty damn underwhelmed. Overall, the bikes rides and performs decent but isn't near as polished nor as inspiring as I expected. Partially, I'm hoping I didn't make the wrong decision as it's one of the first bike's I've purchased without riding. For me, it will be 90% on road to cruise/hooligan around and grab a fire road if I see something interesting. Any other offroad excursions I have a dedicated dirt bike for that. I wanted more of a longer travel Supermoto bike.

Couple thoughts. The throttle is literally half asleep...maybe for some this is easy in the dirt but coming from years of dirt bikes making 50whp and weighing 230lbs this thing feels like a slug until about 6k rpm and full beans. Needless to say the throttle isn't linear whatsoever, I could barely time rev matching and downshifts at all. I read about the Cam A or B differences on other Scrambles but haven't seen any PN#'s posted. What's my best option here? Can I just buy the older gen more aggressive throttle tube/cam or which G2 Throttle system are people doing to cure this? I don't expect V4S throttle response but this is worse than my 1987 CM400...

The gear box is rather clunky. Tons of false neutrals between shifts and it doesn't like to quickly downshift when coming to a stop. It's a very careful 5-4-3-2-1 type of ordeal and trying to find neutral is hit or miss. Again, maybe spoiled as I find my KTM's gearboxes to generally be butter (did take a few hundred miles to loosen up). I've read some say this loosens up over time and some say switching oils definitely helps. I'm pretty surprised at how hard I literally have to shift this thing at times. Is this fairly common?

Lastly, performance - namely exhaust, emissions, and power. The exhaust I find to be super quiet and not letting out that classic twin soundtrack. That will need to definitely change quick as it feels far too plugged up. I've already noticed some backfiring and slight pops in decel at various revs as well. I have read this is due to smog pump/emissions. Does all this stuff need to be mechanically removed or does just a Rexxer tune take care of this? Any feedback on people that have de-smog/tuned theirs is appreciated.

I apologize if most of this has been asked prior, I've spent the last few days browsing the forum for answers and came up with few things but hoping for additional feedback. Thank you!
Hello guys,

Just picked up my first Ducati and it's a 2020 DS. Reading such glowing reviews from most I thought this would be the perfect cruise around bike when I'm not on my KTM 350EXC in the woods. Well couple rides and little over 100 miles in (still in break-in) but I've ridden it at about 80% and to be honest I'm pretty damn underwhelmed. Overall, the bikes rides and performs decent but isn't near as polished nor as inspiring as I expected. Partially, I'm hoping I didn't make the wrong decision as it's one of the first bike's I've purchased without riding. For me, it will be 90% on road to cruise/hooligan around and grab a fire road if I see something interesting. Any other offroad excursions I have a dedicated dirt bike for that. I wanted more of a longer travel Supermoto bike.

Couple thoughts. The throttle is literally half asleep...maybe for some this is easy in the dirt but coming from years of dirt bikes making 50whp and weighing 230lbs this thing feels like a slug until about 6k rpm and full beans. Needless to say the throttle isn't linear whatsoever, I could barely time rev matching and downshifts at all. I read about the Cam A or B differences on other Scrambles but haven't seen any PN#'s posted. What's my best option here? Can I just buy the older gen more aggressive throttle tube/cam or which G2 Throttle system are people doing to cure this? I don't expect V4S throttle response but this is worse than my 1987 CM400...

The gear box is rather clunky. Tons of false neutrals between shifts and it doesn't like to quickly downshift when coming to a stop. It's a very careful 5-4-3-2-1 type of ordeal and trying to find neutral is hit or miss. Again, maybe spoiled as I find my KTM's gearboxes to generally be butter (did take a few hundred miles to loosen up). I've read some say this loosens up over time and some say switching oils definitely helps. I'm pretty surprised at how hard I literally have to shift this thing at times. Is this fairly common?

Lastly, performance - namely exhaust, emissions, and power. The exhaust I find to be super quiet and not letting out that classic twin soundtrack. That will need to definitely change quick as it feels far too plugged up. I've already noticed some backfiring and slight pops in decel at various revs as well. I have read this is due to smog pump/emissions. Does all this stuff need to be mechanically removed or does just a Rexxer tune take care of this? Any feedback on people that have de-smog/tuned theirs is appreciated.

I apologize if most of this has been asked prior, I've spent the last few days browsing the forum for answers and came up with few things but hoping for additional feedback. Thank you!


Hello,

2018 DS owner here. For someone who has experience with dirt bikes I definitely understand where you are coming from. I too initially felt a bit underwhelmed when I first got it. Initially when I was doing research and testing the waters, I realized that this bike is a good foundation. There is a lot of things you can easily mod on the bike to make it YOURS. Once I added some leo vance slip ons it was massive changing point for me as removal of the CAT resulted in more pep and a better riding experience right off the bat. I also added some forward controls as well as a gearing indicator to give it more functionality on road. My final recommendation was to change out the tires. The knobby tires would be great if I was riding on the desert... (I wonder how many people are actually doing that) but the grip was meh on road. I changed my rear to Avon Trailriders and I noticed more get up and go pretty quickly.

Overall I think Ducati has an interesting value add with its scramblers as they are easily molded into whatever you want. My advice would be to break it in and go with high viscosity oil when you change it, (i use 15w50) the difference is noticeable. Otherwise, you can always go tear up the dirt tracks to get that fast paced feel.
 

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See if you can find a 15-16 MY throttle tube, loads of people complained about how abrupt they were so Ducati neutered them on newer models.

I have the same issue with my brakes, bleeding them with Motul RBF600 improved the feeling but after a couple months they’re back to mush.

You have to understand as controversial to the scrambler community as this is, these bikes are a lifestyle brand experiment for Ducati, performance isn’t the priority!

With some mods these bikes are amazing, check out what some of these guys have done:


 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That's exactly the throttle tube I picked up. Next up is Termi or SC exhaust with Rexxer tune to hopefully add some more spunk.
 

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I also bought my first ducat a classic 2016. You're right it's not a crazy light ripper. I too am coming off a desert racing background on lots of KTMs including my last dual sport bike which was a 690R that I put 15,000 miles on. and I'm loving this scrambler so far You have to understand the bike for what it is: an air-cooled 800cc street bike, With a 15 plus year old design motor :censored: it's awesome it's fun but it sounds like you might be happier with a 1090 adventure R.
 

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The 1100 is a freighttrain, too. I hear people talk all kinds of shit about how the 800 and smaller are truer to the lineup, are lighter, and rip. I think the Rev limiter and first service have to help this, and you’re going to put better exhaust on and lighten the bike up with parts even if this thing was already a blast. Just stick to your guns, keep the bike in your small capacity bike stable, be thankful you’re buying Ducati’s while the world is on fire, and eventually find the sweet spot for riding it. They were never meant to be off-road or touring bikes (though the 1100 is crazy comfortable). They are all specifically designed and tuned to capture the millennial market, because Ducati found out they have no balls. I’m not pointing that at you. I’m just saying acknowledging what the bike is purposed for by the factory might help you understand it, upgrade it, and enjoy it.
 

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I think the Scrambler line is more about looks and going to the ice cream shop :) I chose between Monster821, Hypermotard and the DS and went with the DS maily because I like to keep my driving license. The Hypermotard 950 is way more agressive and the Monster is somewhere inbetween. The only thing I kinda miss is the throttle response, so I will change the throttle tube any day now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think the Scrambler line is more about looks and going to the ice cream shop :) I chose between Monster821, Hypermotard and the DS and went with the DS maily because I like to keep my driving license. The Hypermotard 950 is way more agressive and the Monster is somewhere inbetween. The only thing I kinda miss is the throttle response, so I will change the throttle tube any day now.
Ironically, I was between the very same bikes as well. Although on paper I liked the Hypermotard 950 it was more than I needed and I didn't find it that comfortable. Definitely wouldn't be a bike where I could see doing longer 3-5hr rides. The Monster 821 Stealth I actually had the paperwork completed and was about to buy but changed to the DS last minute. Part of me still wishes I got the 821 but again it was a bit more aggressive riding position than I wanted and at 6'4 it felt too small for me.

With that said, I switched out to the older pre-17 throttle cam (same as Ducati Monster) with the guidance of Max Cool for the proper PN#. It has made a WORLD of difference! Frankly, looking at the OEM throttle cam it's nearly flat until about 70-80% pull and this is why the bike is so overly lazy in stock form. For a beginner rider this is great but for somebody that has ridden sport bikes or aggressive dirt bikes I guarantee this will be the #1 complaint. Switching throttle cams honestly made much more of a difference than I expected. 3/4 of my gripe with this bike are gone. The torque is available MUCH sooner, the throttle response is night and day, and it's even easier to shift appropriately being able to rev match and time shifts better. For $50-60 this should be the very first mod anybody does. To be honest Ducati should include both the A and B throttle cams to decide, I've had previous bikes that include both and allows the rider to better adjust the bike for their experience and/or riding conditions. With that said, riding it off-road now would be much trickier especially for people that aren't use to sensitive throttle control. Luckily, I have my KTM for that so my DS will mostly be on-road use only.

Quick pic sleeping next to the new garage mate:

 

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I won't go over in detail about the throttle tube issue as some of guys covered it pretty good. Before I bought my 2017 DS, I had the Urban Enduro. When I rode the DS off the dealer parking log, I almost dropped it because it didn't go forward when I twisted the throttle. The UE had a nice snappy throttle and like the guys said, they dumbed it down to meet the lowest common denominator rider. I haven't changed the throttle tube/cam yet but will when I get the heated grips installed.

As for the brakes...the UE and DS were the first non-sportbikes I've ever owned and the brakes are completely underwhelming. The UE was about 400lbs and one disc was barely enough. The DS has an additional 50lbs so one disc is not nearly enough. I haven't done my regular brake upgrades (braided lines, upgrade master cylinder, etc...) on the DS but even if I did, I highly doubt that one disc is ever going to be sufficient. The new Scrambler 1100s have two discs and they weight about the same as the DS. If there was any one area that is glaringly deficient on the DS, it's the brakes.

I'm looking forward to switching out that throttle tube and giving it a little more pep via pipe/ECU and I think that will transform the riding experience. Of course, more pep will exacerbate the lack of braking problem. sigh....
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think the pads are part of the culprit as the initial bite really isn't there. I think going to the Ferodo or EBC sintered HH pad will significantly help here.
 

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Pads is usually the thing that makes biggest difference, I don't ride all that agressive, besides an evening at a racetrack , but I find the brakes ok. Not sportsbike/supermoto good.

I almost went with the 821 Stealth but since I live on a gravel road I went with the DS instead. Need to google that throttle tube partnumber, or just ask my local dealer. But it is from any monster in the same year range as the DS ?
 
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