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Many here are first time riders and others have been in the saddle longer than they care to remember.

I figure that this would be a great place for us to impart knowledge for others to read without fear of asking a "dumb" question.

What does a new rider need to know about riding and the Scrambler in general?
 

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If you are new to riding I would say what you need is time on the bike to get to know it. Get out a map and look for back roads that do not have much traffic and plot out a loop from your house and back. Maybe with a lunch stop in the middle. Then get out and ride. As you get more confident branch out and add more scenic rides. Unless you bought it as a daily commuter I would avoid high speed / traffic areas until you have some miles under your belt.

My two cents.
 

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Take a riding course, watch online videos, read "Twist of the wrist 1 & 2", and most importantly ride ride ride… ride everyday. Experience is the mother of all!
 

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For UK newcomers, I recommend the IAM course, as well as the Police publication, 'Roadcraft.' As a BOF, I have to wonder why anyone would want to pull a wheelie deliberately, whilst riding on Tarmac, as a prosecution for careless riding is probable if seen by one of our Boys in Blue.
 

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thanks a lot guys

I am going to be a new rider in like a month in the meantime taking a motorcycle course
and also my dealer sent me the link for the videos above well only number II
 

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nothing beats getting out there and riding the thing at your own pace in all conditions, it's always a learning exercise. Riding a bike is about YOUR enjoyment.
If you wanted some tuition, and you are never to old to learn, I would recommend i2i MCA, they run motorcycle control courses which teach you the simple stuff - how motorcycles go round corners, how stable bikes really are, how u have more grip than you'll ever need etc,.

I'd been riding 25+ years when I did their MC1 & MC3 courses and learnt loads.
 

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Sometimes there's a stark contrast between the things you are taught by the more experienced ones and the reality of being a beginner. Being a fresh rider myself I intend to have a few videos that address that. Unfortunately I have to wait till spring as I'm waiting for some decent weather and my new motorcycle.
For example the way I was taught to take off: you slowly release the clutch until you hit the friction zone and the bike starts to move slightly, then you give it smoothly a little bit of gas and releasing the clutch further you keep adding gas as necessary. Well, the reality is, following this I kept stalling my motorcycle every other time while riding in the city. You simply don't have that time every time to go through all that. What you should do, is first of all give it a little bit of rev, and then start to release the clutch. It's actually what everybody is doing themselves anyway, but most "teachers" I've encountered still kept talking about the friction zone etc...
And also stopping.. people keep talking about rev-matching and going through the gears as you come to a stop. Reality is, you just pull in the clutch and stop, and only then start to work through the gears...
Now I understand, I might have been the unlucky one to end up with bad teachers, but just maybe there are newbies with the same issues.. ;)
Also, I'm not saying experienced riders have nothing to contribute, au contraire, just wish to present an additional view on things. =)
 

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Not sure I agree with your initial advice Electro! But my only point is 'each to his or her own'. One finds ones way and of all the riders I know, each seems to handle things slightly differently than the others. Myself included. The IAM course is a good idea but not if there is a lack of confidence/experience in the first place.
 

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Once you are comfortable with the mechanics of stopping and going which is very different on different bikes and you are comfortable with that then my best advice is to ride like no one else on the road can see you. Once you start doing that you won't be surprised by other drivers that don't see you and stay alive longer. It's help me be accident free for over 40 years now.
 

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Not sure I agree with your initial advice Electro!
Exactly my point. No need to agree at this point. My only wish is for there to be a multitude of opinions and options and ideas out there for the beginners to try out and see, what works the best for them.
I think this might be one of those places, where I'm open for discussion. Not offering an absolute truth, rather trying to present my thoughts that I had as I was starting to ride and struggling on the process of.
 

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My nomination for all time coolest rider safety clip. Bikes and the gear have certainly improved a bunch but everything presented still 100% relevant in my opinion.

Not so Easy - A Motorcycle Safety Film



 

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As a new rider the most important things to remember for me are:

1. always drive within your own limitations
2. treat everyone else on the road as a complete idiot
3. always expect the unexpected, e.g. do not always assume that a blinking vehicle will actually turn off
4. be patient
5. always look a long way ahead and anticipate

A few simple rules that will make life so much easier and your riding experience a lot safer, I have been riding a bike since my 14th year on and offroad and my last accident lies some 40 years ago.
 

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As a new rider the most important things to remember for me are:

1. always drive within your own limitations
2. treat everyone else on the road as a complete idiot
3. always expect the unexpected, e.g. do not always assume that a blinking vehicle will actually turn off
4. be patient
5. always look a long way ahead and anticipate

A few simple rules that will make life so much easier and your riding experience a lot safer, I have been riding a bike since my 14th year on and offroad and my last accident lies some 40 years ago.
Agreed 100%
 

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On the riding defensively issue, I would say to second guess everyone and everything. Also, assume nobody can see or hear you. Lane splitting and no one has turn signals on? Any car can pull in front of you any moment. That one car that actually has turn signals on? Guess what, they are not turning. Or they are signaling right and turning left. Random people on the street, kids, balls, deers, gigantic pot holes behind a blind curve.. don't go faster than you can react. And don't be an idiot :D
 

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Always look at the wheels of the cars. You can tell if a car is about to pull out first by seeing spinning wheels before you realise the car itself is moving. Also you can tell the direction the car is about to turn.
 

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SNIP... And also stopping.. people keep talking about rev-matching and going through the gears as you come to a stop. Reality is, you just pull in the clutch and stop, and only then start to work through the gears... =)
I think you are slightly underestimating the use of engine braking. If you are aware of your surroundings there's hardly ever a time (IMO) you just yank the clutch and hit the brakes. Its all about anticipation, knowing what's going on around you and going down through the gears whilst also braking to stop safely and in plenty of time.

Riding groups are also a way to improve if you find a good one. I'll echo the words of a contributor earlier too - no one has anything to prove, just ride for your own enjoyment and don't get wrapped up in any macho 'keeping up with the gang' style riding (males normally, girls are a lot brighter;).
 

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I think you are slightly underestimating the use of engine braking. If you are aware of your surroundings there's hardly ever a time (IMO) you just yank the clutch and hit the brakes. Its all about anticipation, knowing what's going on around you and going down through the gears whilst also braking to stop safely and in plenty of time.
I totally agree with you! The case I was talking about was more like the very first steps you make riding in traffic. It's what happened to me. I almost drove blind into the intersection because I was too worried about shifting down the gears and trying to figure out where in the range am I exactly... There's a good chance most of the riders are taught proper braking procedure before they are sent into the traffic and get to practice it as well. Maybe my instructors had a look at my beard and figured I'm old enough to know these things by now.. even though I did make a point, that I had never ridden before.. =)
 
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