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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Having done about 500 miles in various conditions since yesterday, I now have a new appreciation for the throttle on this machine.

I would not call it hypersensitive, I call it extremely responsive. It is not just when "starting off". It is responsive at any speed and in any gear. (The close gear ratios of this bike exaggerates this.)

This responsive throttle is a pleasure on smooth roads but with rough roads it can quickly create unwanted responses.

I think that there are multiple points to be aware of, in order to control this throttle, instead of it controlling you.

One factor is the very upright seating position. While it can be comfortable and relaxed on smooth roads with mild cruising speeds, when things get going on rough roads &/or higher speeds, you may find yourself "hanging on" rather than "leaning on" the grips.

This creates an exaggeration of the instability because you can not stabilize the throttle. So my first suggestion, is to slide your butt a bit rearward and give yourself a little weight "leaning on the grips".

Even with this more stable body position, bumps will move your body, which is connected to the arm, which is connected to the hand and so to keep the throttle stable...you would need to adjust the position to accommodate for this movement........get my drift? This is an IMPOSSIBLE task. (It can partly be blamed on suspension but I would say the short wheelbase helps make things happen very quickly, no matter how good the suspension becomes dialed in.)

Unless you use a rest stop. Think of picking up a pen and writing something without resting your hand on the desktop vs. how you would normally be resting it solidly on the surface.

My preference, when the roads are smooth to slightly rough is to create a rest stop with one or two fingers on the front brake lever. This has a dual advantage of creating a rest stop to stabilize the throttle AND you are also covering the brake, thus reducing reaction time.

(these pictures are taken without gloves for diagrammatic clarity, wear your gloves!)



If you are following what I am trying to describe you will understand that if the throttle remains in a fixed position to the brake lever, it will be steady.

BUT...this only remains true when the brake lever itself, remains in a fixed position. And with rough roads the lever can become mobile as well, relative to the handlebar.

So I have discovered this technique, that works very well for me. That is all I can say about it. It works for me.

You will have to decide for yourself, if it is right for you.

So here is my stability position when the road is rough or I see an upcoming bump, pothole or whatever...



The thumb is solidly resting on the brake reservoir and the index finger in against the grip flange.
There is a natural pressure that squeezes these two points together and fixes the throttle position with the handlebar.

Using this technique, I can ride studder bumps without any noticeable change in the throttle position.

(If you are skilled enough, you can adjust the brake lever close in and use this thumb rest AND still cover the brake but this is pretty advanced.)

With both these techniques (finger on brake rest & thumb against reservoir) you must develop the skill of "rotating the throttle within your grip" rather than "overt wrist movement".

I know this may be hard to understand so if there are any questions about what I am trying to describe, please ask.

Edit: I was speaking from memory (which is bad) instead of looking at picture...thumb on throttle housing NOT brake reservoir.
 

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Some good points and observations there ,Ogre,

I should be able to try out my new rear shock today , I do think , Like you the short wheelbase and the pogo stick effect of the suspension doesn't help matters on rough roads etc, :rolleyes:
 

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Makes perfect sense to me. Thank you for taking the time to post up an excellent description. Looks like you had a great day riding, too.

Sarah
 

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My first ride was yesterday and I have to admit I did not find any throttle sensitivity issues during the day. Seemed very responsive and steady for the time I rode both on the freeway and some pretty bumpy back country roads. I'll use your tips though if I see a problem in the future.
 

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I rode about 60 miles of bumpy country lanes today, and the sensitive throttle was very evident and a bit of a pain! I tried both techniques but neither felt comfortable. I think I'll take a look at re profiling the throttle tube.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Check any bike forum discussing lean- mapped EFI and you'll find the same--- some bikes badly affected, some bikes not so much.

Sarah
I really did not notice a problem either, at first. It was after spending 2 full days, on varying road conditions that I found there where some conditions where it was impossible to be steady on the throttle without using this technique.

It is not really a problem if you are free to "get on it" or even "ride off pavement", it's more when you have to/want to be STEADY and the road surface creates a studder.

Hopefully, once suspension mods are tweaked this will become a non-issue but for now I can control it this way.

I personally, do NOT want to make my throttle less responsive.
 

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I use the clutch a lot in 'unstable' situations but am not sure if it is good to do this?? (i.e., 'slipping' the clutch). At the mo it's the best option for me to smooth out the jerky ride but am wondering if it isn't a good thing to do ...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I use the clutch a lot in 'unstable' situations but am not sure if it is good to do this?? (i.e., 'slipping' the clutch). At the mo it's the best option for me to smooth out the jerky ride but am wondering if it isn't a good thing to do ...
It is a wise and necessary choice. It can wear out a clutch faster but they can be replaced (with an upgraded one, even better than stock).
 

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That's all fine and good but I can tell you the throttle on my icon is completely fucked. I am a very smooth rider and have been riding some form of motorcycle for the last 34 years.

I shouldn't have to feather the clutch when I have to make slow speed turns. I know some don't have the issue but mine is seriously an on and off switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
That's all fine and good but I can tell you the throttle on my icon is completely fucked. I am a very smooth rider and have been riding some form of motorcycle for the last 34 years.

I shouldn't have to feather the clutch when I have to make slow speed turns. I know some don't have the issue but mine is seriously an on and off switch.
I am a very smooth rider too, for over 50 years & I don't have to feather the clutch, IF I use an extra thumb or finger rest, as I described.

BUT...this bike is definitely NOT suitable for newbies!!!
 

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I reprofiled the throttle tube as seen on another post. Mine had a very steep ramp right at the point the cable nipple fits. I reduced the cam effect so it's a constant radius and mine is much improved!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I reprofiled the throttle tube as seen on another post. Mine had a very steep ramp right at the point the cable nipple fits. I reduced the cam effect so it's a constant radius and mine is much improved!
That is all well & good but fixing it yourself is also delaying the inevevidible recall & dealer/corporation fix.

It's a new warrantied bike. If you think it has a problem take it to dealer & COMPLAIN!

I don't think mine has that initial on/off problem (but it is very sensitive at any position & rough road surfaces can make it hard to be steady).
 

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I reprofiled the throttle tube as seen on another post. Mine had a very steep ramp right at the point the cable nipple fits. I reduced the cam effect so it's a constant radius and mine is much improved!
Yeah I saw that fix and I think I'm going to see what my throttle ramp looks the same.

Yeah, I'm all about the dealer fixing it...but in my experience most dealers will not do jack until they are absolutely forced too. And one guy, or a couple guys saying "hey, this throttle is grabby".. is not going to force their hand.

Besides my dealer is 3 hours away :(
 

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I reprofiled the throttle tube as seen on another post. Mine had a very steep ramp right at the point the cable nipple fits. I reduced the cam effect so it's a constant radius and mine is much improved!
Thank you for reporting back on this. These kinds of throttle issues can make riding the bike downright miserable in some situations. Thanks again.

Sarah
 
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