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I heard the FT's lower bars drop the aerodynamic drag coefficient by 37%, and combined with the deflection of the air hitting the vinyl seat plates it makes it slippery through the air, resulting in an additional 15km/h top end speed.

The double barrel exhaust on the other hand affects the bike on crosswinds and results in slower acceleration (but improved breaking) in winds above 140km/h (so be mindful riding in cyclonic weather).

The urban Enduro is meant to create negative g forces and suck the bike to the ground with its belly pan... It corners like its on rails, hence the re-enforced handlebars with the crossbar.

The classic pulls the biggest wheelies due to the extra spoiler effect down the back with the longer mudguard. This is why the seat has a different pattern to provide more grip and avoid the rider slipping backward in a mile-long wheelie.

So you'd think the icon would be left behind, but here's the thing: it has the shortest tank badge, which is no coincidence: it is 143gr instead of the 200+ on the other bikes. This is just the starting point: it's lack of "extras" means the icon's power-to-weight ratio exceeds that of the Panigale R and the Bugatti Veyron. This also explains why the seat is the hardest: no padding = less weight.
 

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Two of the guys here went for a ride this week with an icon with a Termi without baffle and a FT, I heard the FT sounds deeper than the stock but not as loud as the race termi.

On the other hand I have ridden my icon with and without the race termi and performance wise it doesn't really feel any different - just the noise. I've also changed my bars to the FT ones for looks, the position has changed a little but nothing of significance either. So the only other factors would be seats, which we know the Icon has the least padding (You can even see it) and the wheels. I don't honk you'd feel the wheels other than on a track, but there's the practicality element of tube vs tubeless. All in all, same bikes, different bling. If you can tell any differences you're probably one of those people who can tell whether you're running 95 octane vs 98 octane fuel. I cannot.
 

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As far as I know the only differences are:
- weight: not sure this is noticeable, but there's an argument that the lighter the better.
- punctures: it's widely agreed that tubeless perform better with a puncture as they tend to deflate at a slower rate, rather than "exploding", and that they're also repairable on the road most times with portable repair kits, without removing the wheel or tire. Tuned wheels need to be removed for a new tube to be inserted which is hard to do on the go.
- flexibility: spoke wheels tend to be more flexible (hence why they are widely used for off-road) and the spokes are repairable / replaceable. The alloy wheels are harder and if they crack they're a write-off
 
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