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Discussion Starter #1
I have not had my Classic for long and at first thought it must be me. Now I have decided the back brake is crap. Is this a normal scrambler issue and can it be rectified? or do I have to live with it?
 

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I have decided the rear brake is absolutely fine. Not overly fierce, but there when I need it. About perfect for controlling low speed maneuvers without running the risk of blocking it accidentally.

(Maybe you need to adjust the lever position, flush the fluid, make sure the sliding pins are clean and lubed...just to name a few things. Got no idea if your bike is new or not)
 

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I have decided the rear brake is absolutely fine. Not overly fierce, but there when I need it. About perfect for controlling low speed maneuvers without running the risk of blocking it accidentally.

(Maybe you need to adjust the lever position, flush the fluid, make sure the sliding pins are clean and lubed...just to name a few things. Got no idea if your bike is new or not)
Hm. You supposed to lube the sliding pin? Is that the pin holding the brake pads? I didend dare to lube it when it so close to the pads. What do you lube it with?

And to the topic. I think it seems good enough. Don't have alot of experience with other bikes tho.
 

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No not the pin holding the pads. That should be clean, and dry. You can polish it if you feel sexy, but no lube here.

I mean the two pins that allow the caliper and caliper bracket move between each other.
 

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I have not had my Classic for long and at first thought it must be me. Now I have decided the back brake is crap. Is this a normal scrambler issue and can it be rectified? or do I have to live with it?
Hard to tell if it's just you or not because the only description in here is that it's "crap".

What is it doing or not doing?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
When you apply the brake it just feels wooden and doesn’t stop the bike. I have checked through the brake and can’t find an obvious problem so I’ve ordered some new pads and will go through it again when fitting them.
 

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When you apply the brake it just feels wooden and doesn’t stop the bike. I have checked through the brake and can’t find an obvious problem so I’ve ordered some new pads and will go through it again when fitting them.
Mine is definitely soft with a manageable taper. It gets a lot of use and I've never had a complaint about it. I'm not totally sure what you mean by "wooden", but makes me think stiff with a short travel.

1) Fluid in rear master cylinder is between mix and max?
2) The rear brake has an adjuster rod that makes physical contact with the rubber valve. May be able to move that and find a sweet spot.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Wooden means no feel just like pressing your foot on a piece of wood instead of a pedal with a little give. Also I cannot feel any bite or grab from the brake no matter how hard I press. There is no way I could get the ABS to activate even if I tried.
The piston is free the caliper moves on its pins the fluid is OK just hope it’s knackered pads. If the brakes work on other bikes then I’ll get mine to work eventually.
 

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No issues with either brake on our Scrambler. They aren’t Panigale brakes but it would be unrealistic to expect that and they are way better than many other bikes I have ridden or owned. IMO they are pretty well perfect for the Scramblers intended use.
 

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My back brake was pretty rubbish when new, but since I hardly use it anyway it didn't bother me much. Once fully bedded-in though it was okay. Not brilliant, but perfectly acceptable.

Mind you, it did take 7,000km to bed in (probably through the aforementioned lack of use).

bm
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No issues with either brake on our Scrambler. They aren’t Panigale brakes but it would be unrealistic to expect that and they are way better than many other bikes I have ridden or owned. IMO they are pretty well perfect for the Scramblers intended use.
Not anyway near the back brake on my Tiger
 

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One of the issues on any bike rear brake with a chain - is that you can get specs of chain lube on the disc - either from fling off - or when you are lubing the chain

In addition - Many (me included) motorcyclists keep bike clean.. and use things like silicone spray to keep thins clean and stop them rusting.

I suggest you try cleaning the pads and the disc with brake cleaner and then after every clean - after bike is dried - have a tissue that has brake cleaner on it and wipe over the front and rear sides of the front and rear discs - to remove any residual cleaning polish / lube that remains.
 

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One of the issues on any bike rear brake with a chain - is that you can get specs of chain lube on the disc - either from fling off - or when you are lubing the chain
In close to 50 years of being associated with motorcycles with rear disc brakes that is the very first time I have heard any mention of chain lube regularly finding its way onto brake discs. Either I've lived with my head in the clouds or it really is not an issue and I suspect the later simply because if it were a potential problem every chain lube container would have so many warnings about it from the manufacturers lawyers that there would not even be enough room for the brand label.
 

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If you look to some of the other Ducati forums where they complain about rear brake issues on Ducati's - you see it comes up there as a potential cause.

I did not say REGULARLY - I said CAN....because others have no issue..

Me - if I have an issue - its generally not because of chain lube - because I use a guard behind when I spray cleaner and spray chain lube - but cleaning product... - I spray silicone on the lower part of the bike (not brakes) but it does migrate in the air - so I clean the discs with cloth and brake cleaner to be sure.
 

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When you apply the brake it just feels wooden and doesn’t stop the bike. I have checked through the brake and can’t find an obvious problem so I’ve ordered some new pads and will go through it again when fitting them.
also flush the rear brake fluid in case is contaminated.
 

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If you look to some of the other Ducati forums where they complain about rear brake issues on Ducati's - you see it comes up there as a potential cause.
Probably on the bikes with a single sided swing arm where the disc is inboard of the rear sprocket like our Monster. I still can't see it being an issue on a bike where the disc is on the other side of the wheel to the chain unless the owner stands 10 feet back and just sprays and hopes with the chain lube.

I use a guard behind when I spray cleaner and spray chain
Exactly. I just hunt in the recycle rubbish bin for a small cardboard box (cereal boxes are good) and put the cardboard between the lower part of the chain and the wheel.
 

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I use an 18" to 24" length of 2" X 1" x 1/16" aluminium angle behind chain and angled down - and spray cleaner and lube - the run off then runs down the angle and drips into a jug that i have there to catch it - the jug is placed into a 24" x 8" plastic planter tray - to catch any escapes too - to keep it all as tidy as possible...

The planter extends under the front and rear sprocket - catching the drippers...
 

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Wooden means no feel just like pressing your foot on a piece of wood instead of a pedal with a little give. Also I cannot feel any bite or grab from the brake no matter how hard I press. There is no way I could get the ABS to activate even if I tried.
The piston is free the caliper moves on its pins the fluid is OK just hope it’s knackered pads. If the brakes work on other bikes then I’ll get mine to work eventually.
For reference I can easily trigger the abs system for the rear brake. I wouldn't even say I have to press the brakepedal particularly hard. And I definitely have a "feel" to the pedal, doesn't feel wooden at all.
 

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Gasman, the brakes on Scramblers function just fine. Vee twins have more engine braking than multi cylinder bikes so the rear brakes are generally weaker than other engines to help prevent a lock up when downshifting hard while braking hard. But it should still stop you and you should also be be able to get the ABS to kick in.
If your bike is brand new then the brake is not set properly by the dealer. So take it back.
If its secondhand I´d look at these 2 things;
either the master cylinder has insufficient play on the activating rod to allow fluid from the reservoir to go into the system, in which case adjust it until you can feel the little knock of free play,
or, more likely you have air in the system. This air goes up to the ABS block under the seat so is difficult to bleed the conventional way.
You need to carefully and minutely crack open the two banjo bolts on the ABS block and bleed it there. Do one at a time and get plenty of rag/tissue in there to catch any fluid. This is really a two man job. One to press and hold the pedal and one to carefully crack open and then close the banjo bolt.
HTH
 
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