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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The Ducati Scrambler - a bike built to a price point - but one that I am growing to love.

One of the first things I usually do when a new bike rolls into the garage, is to replace the levers.

I’ve grown way too accustomed to quality levers, like those from CRG or Pazzo to ever keep the stock ones on for long.

But, when I purchased my new Ducati Scrambler, I promised myself that I would try really hard not to throw a lot of money into aftermarket stuff. This was supposed to be a ”bargain-bike”. I knew from my test riding that I would be dropping some dough fixing the suspension, and also realized that a good aftermarket pipe would be in order, but my mantra was going to be “no money spent unless is improves function, handling or performance”.

Aftermarket levers don’t fit that bill - a good set of CRG’s will set you back over $200.

I’ve been replacing the stock levers on my son’s bikes with cheap Chinese stuff from eBay over the years (he lays bikes down like his old man did when he was his age - so no pricey stuff for him), and after a few purchases of dubious quality, found a supplier overseas who actually makes some decent quality stuff.

Unlike most of the cheap levers on Ebay, this stuff is made to a somewhat higher standard, and even the anodizing holds up over time (unlike the others that fade to funny shades of pink after a few weeks). The difference in cost is not too much, whereas the super-crap stuff usually goes for as cheap as $35 a set, these sell for about $90 - still a bargain compared to the “real” stuff.

Which brings me to my recent Father’s Day present...



Behold, semi-good quality levers for the Scrambler, direct from China. They even have the cool Ducati logo imprinted on them. My good son gave his pop a decent gift this year.



Of course, they are not perfect, I had to chase the pivot hole on the clutch side with a drill to get them installed, but in the end they worked out pretty damn good.

Word of caution to those who will be replacing levers on this bike...

Be careful with the super-cheap brake light switch Ducati uses, it is extremely flimsy. Also, when you remove said switch, there is a small cylindrical piece of plastic (about 1/4” long and less than that in diameter) that hides in a recess in the brake perch. It is easily over looked, and subsequently dropped to the ground. Without it your brake light stay on all the time - LOOK FOR IT!

In the end, they look good, and feel good too, not CRG or Pazzo quality, but pretty damn close - for a lot less dough.






Here is a LINK to the only Chinese supplier worth a damn, don’t be fooled by the hundreds of other lesser vendors out there.

Originally published to my personal blog @ www.moto-graphic.com
 

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Is there a problem with the stock levers or is it just for some bling? (Nothing wrong with bling if it's done right!)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is there a problem with the stock levers or is it just for some bling? (Nothing wrong with bling if it's done right!)
Nope - nothing wrong at all. Just some bling, with the added bonus of easy adjustability on both sides.
 
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I've used the same 'Crap' manufacturer for levers for years without a problem. A couple of others on this forum have used the same. I've never had a quality issue, and mine needed no chasing of holes to fit ;-)
 

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If I was Ducati I would now follow that link and sue their arses!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
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The Ducati Scrambler - a bike built to a price point - but one that I am growing to love.

One of the first things I usually do when a new bike rolls into the garage, is to replace the levers.

I’ve grown way too accustomed to quality levers, like those from CRG or Pazzo to ever keep the stock ones on for long.

But, when I purchased my new Ducati Scrambler, I promised myself that I would try really hard not to throw a lot of money into aftermarket stuff. This was supposed to be a ”bargain-bike”. I knew from my test riding that I would be dropping some dough fixing the suspension, and also realized that a good aftermarket pipe would be in order, but my mantra was going to be “no money spent unless is improves function, handling or performance”.

Aftermarket levers don’t fit that bill - a good set of CRG’s will set you back over $200.

I’ve been replacing the stock levers on my son’s bikes with cheap Chinese stuff from eBay over the years (he lays bikes down like his old man did when he was his age - so no pricey stuff for him), and after a few purchases of dubious quality, found a supplier overseas who actually makes some decent quality stuff.

Unlike most of the cheap levers on Ebay, this stuff is made to a somewhat higher standard, and even the anodizing holds up over time (unlike the others that fade to funny shades of pink after a few weeks). The difference in cost is not too much, whereas the super-crap stuff usually goes for as cheap as $35 a set, these sell for about $90 - still a bargain compared to the “real” stuff.

Which brings me to my recent Father’s Day present...



Behold, semi-good quality levers for the Scrambler, direct from China. They even have the cool Ducati logo imprinted on them. My good son gave his pop a decent gift this year.



Of course, they are not perfect, I had to chase the pivot hole on the clutch side with a drill to get them installed, but in the end they worked out pretty damn good.

Word of caution to those who will be replacing levers on this bike...

Be careful with the super-cheap brake light switch Ducati uses, it is extremely flimsy. Also, when you remove said switch, there is a small cylindrical piece of plastic (about 1/4” long and less than that in diameter) that hides in a recess in the clutch perch. It is easily over looked, and subsequently dropped to the ground. Without it your brake light stay on all the time - LOOK FOR IT!

In the end, they look good, and feel good too, not CRG or Pazzo quality, but pretty damn close - for a lot less dough.






Here is a LINK to the only Chinese supplier worth a damn, don’t be fooled by the hundreds of other lesser vendors out there.

Originally published to my personal blog @ www.moto-graphic.com
Had the small plastic cylindrical thing drop out whilst I was reinstalling....never to be seen again!
I found a replacement.....the unthreaded bit at the end of a plastic number/license plate screw.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Had the small plastic cylindrical thing drop out whilst I was reinstalling....never to be seen again!
I found a replacement.....the unthreaded bit at the end of a plastic number/license plate screw.
Yep, only found mine after searching the garage floor for about 20 minutes.

Also, there was a typo in post in regard to this. I jest to say that this tiny part resided in the brake perch - not the clutch perch.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, it can be adjusted to be significantly closer.
 
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