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Here in northern Wisconsin we can expect winter temps to drop below -10 degrees below zero. My bikes are in my uninsulated garage. I have removed the batteries and seats. I've sprayed WD-40 on everything that isn't painted. Fuel is full and preserved. Is there anything else I can do to protect my bikes from 5 months of cold dark misery ?
 

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1. Move to New Mexico with the bike and ride all year round.
2. Move to Australia for your winter with the bike and ride the southern parts (it's too hot in the north at that time of year).
3. Buy a snowmobile and pretend its a motorcycle and ride it.
 

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If you can - get the tires (tyres) off the ground.

I would use something like ACF50 not WD 40... as it sticks better.

Also I would spray also the painted parts - everything except the tyres (But spray the wheels and hubs and sprockets), brake discs and calipers... but wipe down the caliper outsides and hose banjos with an oily rag... they seem to be treated with something that does not resist the weather.
 

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Here in northern Wisconsin we can expect winter temps to drop below -10 degrees below zero. My bikes are in my uninsulated garage. I have removed the batteries and seats. I've sprayed WD-40 on everything that isn't painted. Fuel is full and preserved. Is there anything else I can do to protect my bikes from 5 months of cold dark misery ?
you may want to use something to push the brake pads away from the disc into the caliper, this stops the pad witness mark often left on the disc during lay-up and also protecs the exposed caliper pistons.
If you plan to change the engine oil at the start of the new season as many owners do, consider changing it at the end of the season instead. What this does is remove all the acids and contaminants etc. found in used oil as-well as any condensation within the oil.
Any time you’re near the bike while stored just give the clutch lever a couple of pulls. This activates the clutch pack and allows oil to flow between the plates reducing the chances of them sticking to each other. Tbh. because it’s a cable and not hydraulic clutch then the lever could be tied even half way to the bars without stressing out anything to separate the clutch plates.
Do not be tempted to start up and let the engine idle in the miss belief your helping it, this only lets fuel wash past the piston rings into your oil and attracts condensation when the hot engine cools.
 

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Do not be tempted to start up and let the engine idle in the miss belief your helping it, this only lets fuel wash past the piston rings into your oil and attracts condensation when the hot engine cools.
I think the caveat there is don't start the engine infrequently. If you started the engine say once a week and let it run until up to operating temp then give it some revs it would be no different than somebody who only rides short distances irregularly. Obviously if you start the engine once for a minute or so during the whole winter that would potentially cause issues with condensation.
 

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“It would be no different than somebody who only rides short distances irregularly”

You’ve just underlined why it’s a bad idea.
I couldn’t think of anything worse for an engine and I’m sure most people know that too. I’ll stick to my original advice without a caveat. Plus @ -10 degrees I’ll take a guess and say the garage door will be shut so there’s another very good reason not to have an engine running for any length of time if at all.
 
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