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Discussion Starter #1
So sorry if this is a stupid question, I just want to make sure I’m doing it right.

Bike has almost 100 miles on it now (Icon), I was told by the salesperson to not go full throttle and to vary speeds for break in period, about 650 miles. For instance, don’t just cruise down the highway at the speed limit - vary the speed down and back up.

What is happening to the bike during break in and how do I make sure I’m doing it right? I have city miles, and can get more if the stop, go and acceleration is needed. Or I can cruise around more, whatever is best. I am finding I like 4000-4500RPMs for responsiveness but should I be going higher and/or lower than that?

At the same time I am breaking in an engine in my KLR that was rebuilt, so I am super interested in understanding the concept, but mostly to ensure proper break in for the Icon.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A heavily debated subject.

(Go for a long twisty ride, don’t baby it, done)
Lol, I like the simplicity of it! Admittedly I’m a timid rider, maybe I should have someone do it for me. I haven’t ridden for years and am just getting back to it after extended health issues, so I ride pretty conservatively (unless I see someone’s trying to blow by me to cut in front, then I might crank on it). :)
 

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Ride it like you stole it is the old best way to do it.
Stay away from the red line and stay away from lugging the engine. Don't drive at a constant throttle (freeway) and whatever you do DO NOT baby it.
The Internet is full of Help wanted posts from people who call their bike their baby and who were very gentle with it new then found out it never ran in properly and it burns oil.
 

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better do the break in as per the owners manual, whatever you do wrong will be saved in me ecu memory and Ducati can void the warranty.
 

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better do the break in as per the owners manual, whatever you do wrong will be saved in me ecu memory and Ducati can void the warranty.
Not really. The ECU does not save every single thing that a vehicle does. It may record over revving but that would be about it it's not some sort of big brother device that monitors the operator second by second.
Even if the ECU did record data the only warranty Ducati or any manufacturer could void would have to be directly related to the data. Lets say you constantly rode the bike at just under the red line and then the fuel tank sprang a leak (seems to have happened to more than one early owner) in order to void the warranty Ducati would have to be able to prove a direct causal relationship between revving the engine and the fuel tank leaking and that the leak was not caused by faulty design or manufacture and in this country at least they would have the proverbial snow flakes chance in hell of being able to do that.
 

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My laymans understanding is this...

Until the first service there is a rev limiter, 7000 RPM, I think. The idea is that the various moving parts are designed with a tiny bit of room to move around in the beginning, then various resistances they encounter cause them to settle into positions where they operate in harmony with each other. Varying the force they are subjected to (i.e. RPM) is important for them to settle into a place that works for all the conditions they will be working under, but the level of stress they are subjected to should be raised only as they parts begin to settle in order to prevent them channeling large forces before they are starting to become well seated and synchronised.

People often talk of piston rings in this process but that is misleading because it's all the parts, really.

Follow the advice in the manual, ride it, don't baby it, don't thrash it, is all about right :)

Remember the engine doesn't really know or care how fast the bike is going, only the RPM matters, and you can vary that by changing gear any time you like.

Being a Ducati, it's not really super happy below 2.5 - 3k, this is normal.

The oil grade during the break in is more viscous to protect the parts during this process, you might find the bike revs freer after the first service and change to 'normal' oil.

Congrats on choosing the correct bike ;)
 

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No sorry, it’s just the piston rings (and to some extend the brake pads), but it’s all about the piston rings.

(And there’s no “break in” rev limiter either)
 

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No sorry, it’s just the piston rings (and to some extend the brake pads), but it’s all about the piston rings.

(And there’s no “break in” rev limiter either)
I could well be wrong, yeah. I would have imagined such a complex mechanical system to have numerous areas that required conditioning, but I’m not a mechanic or an engineer. Not a mechanical engineer, anyway :)

There was most definitely a rev limiter on my bike before the first service, I hit it a couple of times (you get two red flashing lights either side of the instrument panel. Maybe it’s dealer discretion?
 

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Of course there's a rev limiter, around 9k rpm. But to be honest, it's not the revs that define the "load" on an engine. That just means how hard the crankshaft spins.

In all fairness, you have to be a real nutter to need more than 7k rpm anyway, even when you're flogging it. This engine is all about midrange.

I kept it between 3.5 and 7.5k rpm while having fun in the canyons here.
 

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SNIP…There was most definitely a rev limiter on my bike before the first service, I hit it a couple of times (you get two red flashing lights either side of the instrument panel. Maybe it’s dealer discretion?
I hope you still have one. You should.
 

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There was most definitely a rev limiter on my bike before the first service, I hit it a couple of times (you get two red flashing lights either side of the instrument panel. Maybe it’s dealer discretion?
The initial rev limiter is set to 8900rpm according to the workshop service manual and there is no indication in the manual that it can be altered at a dealership. The two red lights are only supposed to flash if you hit 12,000rpm. There is also nothing in the manual that states that the rev limiter is to be adjusted or reset during the 1000km first service.
 

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I hope you still have one. You should.
Haha :) well there is one way to find out...

I doubt I was hitting 12000 rpm when I hit the limiter before, but maybe, who knows... The workshop manual does say “Each calibration of the Engine Control Unit may have a different setting for the thresholds that precede the rev limiter and the rev limiter itself.” So it sounds like the dealer could conceivably alter the settings... but yeah, it doesn’t seem very likely that they would bother... more likely I just misread something!
 

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My Scrambler doesn't rev to redline (9200), but it only has 800 miles on it. Currently have to shift at 8200. I don't subscribe to the idea that you don't need the full RPM range.

When I brought my car in for its 1000 mile ECU dump they had a readout on time in every several RPM bands. Surprisingly, I don't recall anyone getting voided warranties but several were told they weren't breaking in the engine hard enough. Lots of people including myself kept the ECU dump for their records.
 
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