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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

Could someone please help me figure out the correct model number for rear brake pads for our Scramblers?

I'm assuming they are same for all models?

For the front I have the following and I'd like EBC for the rear also as I hear good things from other owners.

Thanks.

EBC Double-H Sintered Brake Pads - FA630HH
 

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Discussion Starter #3
EBC Brakes FA 213HH Sintered for the rear. Yes they are great pads!
Thank you

Keeping the same stock rotors on both front and back, how much of an improvement did you notice? Providing the pistons on the calipers are cleaned before installing new pads?

From the people I spoke to on FB scrambler group, it's a big improvement?

I don't want to shell out $400 for a aftermarket rotor.
 

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I didn’t notice much difference with the EBC rear pads, the front however....much better!

Kept the stock rotors
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Took the advice from here, ordered the EBC FA630HH, look forward to seeing the improvement!
I like mine, both front/back. Don't forget to clean your pistons before installing new pads and bleed the lines after they are on the bike.
 

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I like mine, both front/back. Don't forget to clean your pistons before installing new pads and bleed the lines after they are on the bike.
Not sure I’ll be taking the pistons out if that’s what you mean. Just give the callipers and piston faces a good scrub with some brake cleaner, before re-installing.

Bike will have just been serviced, so I don’t believe I should need to bleed the lines following a pad change, should I?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Not sure I’ll be taking the pistons out if that’s what you mean. Just give the callipers and piston faces a good scrub with some brake cleaner, before re-installing.

Bike will have just been serviced, so I don’t believe I should need to bleed the lines following a pad change, should I?
Sorry for confusion...front caliper comes off, physically manipulate pistons with fingers, spray, scrub, manipulate...that's it, rear one you can't even remove unless you remove the wheel...then bleed once new pads are in.
 

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Jooooosh, push the pistons all the way back into the calipers before fitting the pads. This will have the effect of back bleeding the system anyway. You may need to loosen the master cylinder cap to do this and then watch out that the fluid level doesn´t rise so much that it spills out.
Fit the pads and remember to pump the brake firm again before setting off!
 

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Sorry for confusion...front caliper comes off, physically manipulate pistons with fingers, spray, scrub, manipulate...that's it, rear one you can't even remove unless you remove the wheel...then bleed once new pads are in.
Thanks for the tips. What’s the reasoning behind bleeding the system after changing the pads?

I won’t ever forget to pump them after! Made that mistake when swapping callipers on my old 125! Haha
 

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Two reasons imho.

1. Odds are the fluid level rises too far up once you push the pistons back in to make room for the new pads (if it was ever topped up while the pads were halfway worn, not uncommon to happen). Which could lead to permanently jammed on brakes. Nu bueno

2. You have to bleed it regularly with fresh fluid anyway for best performance, so why not now.


good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the tips. What’s the reasoning behind bleeding the system after changing the pads?

I won’t ever forget to pump them after! Made that mistake when swapping callipers on my old 125! Haha
I guess it just makes sense to bleed since you probably didn't for a while and new pads are going in? I would bleed once a year or once every 2. Get the old fluid out.
 
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