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Discussion Starter #5
You can see the Rev limiter and hear the cut pop two or three times rapid in one portion but can't read the speedo.

I try to stay below 80
 

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Call that a backroad - didn't see too many rough/damaged surfaces, patches, tar snakes or potholes and certainly no timber bridges? Around my way we would call that a well maintained major road.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's typical rural California Backroad riding.
Arkansas, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia...all have rural roads that provide many differing scenarios.

Are you trying to suggest that the route shown in the video is not challenging given the velocity demonstrated??? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Always suggest suiting up, then sprint toward and jump/dive into guardrail. Repeat, save for sliding instead of jumping.
This approximates what it'd be like getting off at 5 MPH...

Adjust cornering speed to give braking distance necessary to achieve your maximum acceptable "get off" speed

Enjoy
 

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Call that a backroad - didn't see too many rough/damaged surfaces, patches, tar snakes or potholes and certainly no timber bridges? Around my way we would call that a well maintained major road.
There's no way that's a major road in densely populated areas in CA.
 

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I didn't watch every second of it, but that road looked a little too straight for my taste. I don't think I'd call it the "twisties"
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I didn't watch every second of it, but that road looked a little too straight for my taste. I don't think I'd call it the "twisties"
Agreed, it's not Deal's Gap. A few too many sideroads, drives, etc...for that action imo

Google Brockway Mountain Drive...the descent into Copper Harbor is short yet quite challenging...very rough heaved deteriorated asphalt and no runout areas. No side roads save for the scenic overlook turnabout.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Letting the MultiStrada cover your six!!!


Notice the Sport touring squid crossing the paint
 

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Backroad... Ha! That would be a major A road in the UK.

I can't figure out who wins in this situation though...
What I do know, is that the Scrambler is a lot more bike than people realise. Especially now I've had it mapped, it pulls up to 90 pretty rapidly.
The suspension just needs sorting to help the tyres stick to our torn up 'roads.'
 

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Backroad... Ha! That would be a major A road in the UK.

I can't figure out who wins in this situation though...
What I do know, is that the Scrambler is a lot more bike than people realise. Especially now I've had it mapped, it pulls up to 90 pretty rapidly.
The suspension just needs sorting to help the tyres stick to our torn up 'roads.'
I was thinking exactly the same.
Come over here and ride our back roads,strewn with leaves,gravel and usually pretty moist and bends you cannot see around,then I'll be impressed with those speeds.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I was thinking exactly the same.
Come over here and ride our back roads,strewn with leaves,gravel and usually pretty moist and bends you cannot see around,then I'll be impressed with those speeds.
Ha! That's what I'm saying. 100, 115, 135HP
In a 400 lb bike with 5" suspension travel on crap surface roads...not going to happen

Husqvarna TE300 with appropriate footwear
 

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It's typical rural California Backroad riding.
Arkansas, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia...all have rural roads that provide many differing scenarios.

Are you trying to suggest that the route shown in the video is not challenging given the velocity demonstrated??? ;)
Certainly not mate, the pace appears to be quite brisk. I could only ride at that pace on major roads and rural highways, and then only in short bursts with my eyes wide open for lurking Hwy Patrol.
 

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I have had to opportunity to ride a large variety of bikes through the Appalachian twisties.

The Scrambler is the most fun for me because of the relaxed riding position and the ease of handling.

Of course, mine is not stock in the seat/suspension categories, upgrades well worth a couple grand IMHO...

The Scrambler is very "forgiving", I think is the best term.

I can be leaned over in the middle of a turn and still be making stress-free corrections/adjustments.

Bends just feel "straighter" on a Scrambler.
 
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