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Last week the dealer I had my bike towed to told me Ducati would not be covered the repairs under warranty and it would cost around $650 for parts and labor. He mentioned that there was not enough free play with the aftermarket levers and believed this to be the root cause of the clutch wear. I was pretty irritated and told them I would contact the local dealer I bought the bike from. They agreed to pick up the bike last week but have not had time to look at the bike yet. I'm hoping to get an update in the next two days and have this either covered under warranty or have the dealer cover the repairs since they installed the aftermarket levers. I still can't believe a clutch would fail around 1500 miles...
May want to look into a Barnett setup. It costs about the same or less with better performance and feedback.

Also, with regards to levers. That's straight up bullshit unless you failed to adjust the clutch play properly after install. The manual calls for 2 to 3mm of travel. I could understand if they were hydraulic clutches, but with a cable setup you can adjust it for any lever you could throw on there if setup properly.
 

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Hello

If there's no free play, I'm pretty sure a clutch can fail in less than 1500 miles. Without any free play, the disks will constantly slide against each other and will be worn very quickly as they are not designed for a constant slide. The normal state for a clutch disk is to be firmly in contact with the next one, without any relative movement between both disks.

To be clear, I'm not saying you are responsible of your "no free play clutch", I'm just explaining that such a situation can wear the disks very quickly.
I took my bike in for it's first service at 800 miles. There was definitely enough free play before the service and I'm also assuming the dealer inspected the bike and would of mentioned if this may be a potential issue. I made no adjustments over the last 600-700 miles. Would the free play need to be adjusted regularly? I'm still waiting to hear from the dealer on their diagnosis.
 

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Since the dealership did the lever swap, you'd think they'd be responsible for the repair. Good luck, let us know how it goes.

Sarah
Thanks Sarah. I'm still waiting to hear back from the dealer and hoping the repairs are covered by the dealer or warranty.
 

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Would the free play need to be adjusted regularly? I'm still waiting to hear from the dealer on their diagnosis.
Yes, the free play needs to be adjusted, but that frequently. I would say it must be checked regularly, but it won't require adjustement before many, many kilometers. A clutch working in oil like ours shoud live more than 100 KKm and free play should only adjusted 3 or 4 times during this period.

When the disks get worn, they become thinner, the disk stack becomes smaller, the pressure disk enters farther in the clutch, the free play gets smaller at the lever. But this shouldn't happen before a long mileage.
 

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Hi, I'm from India and got my scrambler Icon in September 2015. Put on 4800 kms since then and then noticed heavy clutch slipping when i shifted into second and then pulled away. Lot of engine noise not translating into forward thrust, and I could feel the slipping clutch every gear above 2nd. Took the bike to the Ducati service workshop where they opened up the clutch and took pictures for warranty approval from Ducati. There was significant wear in the clutch plates, and they have finally replaced the clutch plates, pressure plate, clutch hub in which these plates sit. Will pickup the bike in a few days after 2 weeks of downtime.

In my city/country, this seems to be a common grouse among all scrambler owners, some reported it around the 6-7000 kms mark, while some even reported it at 2000 kms. The workshop guys tried to attribute the early wear to there being lack of play at the cable at the lever end. Which, in my case wasnt the issue, as I had ensured the lever play was set and checked by them during my first service.

With me, 3 other bikes faced the same problem and all are getting warranty replacement of clutch plates as a result. Could any of you report back if this issue is globally occurring?
Yes from Manila Philippines, my Sixty2 clutch gave up at 5800km, honestly I said screw the warranty, theyll only make life difficult for me, bought parts at Ducati and had it done outside, the most annoying thing, the service managers insist it was my driving...they cant bs moi, been riding for years...moving on
 

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The notion that the aftermarket levers have "insufficient free play" is utter nonsense. The only way that a lever can prohibit you from setting sufficient free play is if the lever shape is such that you haven't enough adjustment range in the cable to achieve free play. I don't know of any aftermarket levers worth buying where this is the case.

When my bike was delivered from the dealer, clutch operation was horrible. I checked and found that there was no free play whatsoever in the clutch ... that was with the stock lever. No free play on the clutch pack means accelerated wear and tear on the clutch actuating mechanism and on the clutch plates. A clutch can be ruined in just a few hundred miles if left that way.

Fixing the clutch action was a simple matter of backing off the lever adjuster to give 5mm play at the lever pivot. I just fitted the CRG adjustable-reach lever the other day (after the correct stanchion arrived, mine was assembled at CRG with a 621 stanchion rather than the correct 611 stanchion; it physically could not be fitted the pivot support) and I set the clutch free play the same way in about 10 seconds. Now I can also adjust the lever standoff from the bar independent of the free play adjustment and have the engagement point set correctly for my hand.

Remember that new bike setup is often handed to the most junior guy in the service shop. The assumption at most dealers is that the bikes coming out of the crates have been 'set up at the factory correctly' so don't need an expert mechanic's time to get them set up correctly. With regard to most things, this is a reasonable assumption; but with regard to small details like the clutch cable adjustment and such, the correct adjustment can only be set and tested to be correct after all the other setup work has been completed. While most service shops then require a senior tech to check the setup, it is often a cursory check and not the in-depth detail check that initial setup deserves.

In my 40+ year history of motorcycling, I've found that a vast proportion of early failures on things like clutches, levers, chains, and so forth have been attributable to sloppy setup work rather than manufacturing defects. Which is why I have spent so much time learning and reviewing the setup on my new Scrambler. Setup includes proper torque on all bolts, proper lubrication where lubrication is needed, proper adjustments where adjustment is needed. So far, my bike came delivered with a poorly adjusted clutch, no lubrication on several critical linkages and pivots (including the throttle assembly, shifter assembly, foot brake assembly), incorrect chain adjustment, and a few bolts only hand-tight and not torqued to proper spec. Each time I find and correct a condition like this, the bike's behavior and operation improves.

Every rider on a new motorcycle should learn their machine and do these simple, basic, maintenance adjustments themselves. In addition to the fact that the motorcycle works better, it gives you as a rider more confidence since you know the machine better.

Which segues perfectly into my earnest request of all Ducati Scrambler owners: We need to get Ducati to revise their policy of not providing a full service manual and a full parts book for their motorcycles. It's absolutely ridiculous that you cannot buy a service manual and parts book for your new $10,000 motorcycle directly from Ducati. Write Ducati and demand that they offer a service manual and parts book, either in fiche, electronic, or paper form, at a reasonable price so that you can understand and work on your motorcycle armed with correct information.
 

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Hello

I may be wrong, but I'm feeling that bikes built in Thaïland are more concerned by clutch wear issues than bikes built in Bologna. Maybe a different clutch provider or different understanding of the clutch setup during the bike build ?
Hi, I can only confirm. I just dropped my Scrambler Desert Sled at Ducati Rama 3 (Bangkok) for clutch wear issues (less than 6 months old / 2400 km). They told me to wait one week for Ducati approval (warranty) and clutch replacement. Let's see what happens next...
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Now my bike is at 13500 kms, and about 500 kms back I noticed the dreaded clutch slipping again! Have notified the workshop manager, and he asked me to send pics of mileage done so that he can email Ducati for a clutch replacement under goodwill. Especially worried because my bike is >2 years old and out of warranty now!
Will keep you guys updated about this. If Ducati doesnt give me a free clutch replacement, I will get the Barnett clutch set and springs and put those on. Cant hurt to try!

Cheers
Sriku
 

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I was having clutch slip a few months ago. Adjusted the cable at the lever and under the tank. It went away. Right after I ordered new clutches....
 

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Discussion Starter #52
I was having clutch slip a few months ago. Adjusted the cable at the lever and under the tank. It went away. Right after I ordered new clutches....
My issue isnt going to be solved by adjusting the cable, the plates show massive amounts of slipping both while setting off from standstill and beyond. These plates are fried, nothing else to do but replace them. The plates are in stock, and the workshop is optimistic about getting a free replacement. So I should be good at least for now.

Cheers,
Sriku
 

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Discussion Starter #53
My dealer has replaced my clutch plates(warranty change), and has increased the oil flow by adding a washer to the bolt that determines the opening from the sump. Hopefully this will work longer than the last two clutches, fingers/toes/all extremities crossed!

Cheers,
Sriku
 

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My dealer has replaced my clutch plates(warranty change), and has increased the oil flow by adding a washer to the bolt that determines the opening from the sump. Hopefully this will work longer than the last two clutches, fingers/toes/all extremities crossed!

Cheers,
Sriku
That´s interesting Sriku, can you throw anymore light on where this bolt is?
 

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Discussion Starter #56
That´s interesting Sriku, can you throw anymore light on where this bolt is?
Its at the oil sump area just below the oil nozzle. Trying to get pics of the exact location. Will upload soon as I can.
The fact that Kawasaki identified the same clutch early wear issue in their Z900 launched within 3000 kms here and added an additional oil pump in those bikes to counter it seems to point to oil delivery being the root cause in such cases.

Cheers,
Sriku
 

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Its at the oil sump area just below the oil nozzle. Trying to get pics of the exact location. Will upload soon as I can.
The fact that Kawasaki identified the same clutch early wear issue in their Z900 launched within 3000 kms here and added an additional oil pump in those bikes to counter it seems to point to oil delivery being the root cause in such cases.

Cheers,
Sriku
good to know. When you have time, check thick is the washer.
good idea to post pictures for reference.
 

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I’m hoping somebody will jump in and explain how oil pump delivery will help a wet clutch that operates in a bath of oil and is splash fed. There will no doubt be an answer but I’m not sure what it will be.
 

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I've been wondering the same thing Hui.
 

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Hi All,

I have recently managed to get my clutch plate, pressure plate and clutch basket boss warrantied after much persuasion and a bit of rant exchange.

This is the second time I faced clutch issues. First time was some time last year at around 18000km done by Ducatisti SG, second one was around 37000km about a month back done by the new local agent Wearnes Singapore.

It took the new local agent - Wearnes Singapore four weeks to have it rectified. Taken into account troubleshooting, investigations and ordering and shipping of parts.

I was told that the clutch plates have new part number now. How true is that i do not know. The Scrambler variant I am riding is the Sixty2.

Wearnes service advisor demanded for receipts as prove of service royalty with agent which I only managed to find two out of four. First 1k, 10k and 20k was done by previous agent - Ducatisti SG, like a year back and I have no idea where I placed the receipts. It was only recent 30K service I managed to keep the receipt.

Previous agent handled the matter like a breeze as they have full records of my servicing and with no questions asked. Shockingly, new agent does not have any of those service records when taking over. They openly mentioned on FB that they have the records and will honor any warranty issues.

With that said, I really hope the new clutch plates will last more than average of 18000km. My bike warranty ends sometime in July this year, I wonder if extending warranty is a good idea.

Faroz
 
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