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I assume you are getting a local shop to do the 12,000 km service? If so, might be worth asking what they will charge to fit it. Else you could ask Hui what he would charge to for a live video stream tutorial. :)
 

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Dean may I please add that there is this oil feed check thing to do when you have the cover off. I posted the procedure in my clutch issue thread. If you got a reasonable life out of tge old clutch without sticking or slipping then probably no issue. Good Luck.
 

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I assume you are getting a local shop to do the 12,000 km service? If so, might be worth asking what they will charge to fit it. Else you could ask Hui what he would charge to for a live video stream tutorial. :)
I think I'll be fine ;). I will get the shop to double check the free-play adjustment when it's in early next year.

I used to mess around a lot with cars mostly, though I did build a Kawasaki Z650 from a pile of parts in boxes when I was younger, but got out of the habit and am a lot more nervous about mechanical things nowadays - Hui's probably forgotten more than I ever knew! ;)
 

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Awesome, sounds like you are on top of it. I too used to alot more than I do now. I find one of the biggest frustration these days is not having access to all the necessary tools at the time of needing them.
 

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Thanks for the encouragement in this thread, and maybe a couple of others, all who have had something to say.

Did my long ride last weekend and the clutch was spinning a little when I was getting a bit over excited with the throttle. Good thing I found the time to rip into it and see if I could still remember how to use a spanner today.

It took me (a complete *rank-amateur, who was never that good when I did used to mess around in my Dad's garage all those years ago) 3 hours from warming the bike up to testing it in the yard. I was very careful and methodical. Working from pages I'd printed from the Workshop Manual and having already digested a couple of YouTube vids but anyone who is half confident shouldn't have a big problem doing this themselves.

The first tricky, and it really isn't that tricky, thing I encountered was actually getting the clutch case off. I was amazed at how many bells of shite I had to knock out of it before I was able to wobble it free from the bike.

Also, if I did this job again I'd remove the rear brake pedal and the lower part of the exhaust. I was wishing I had done this particularly when I was putting the clutch cover back in place - it's a tad fiddly, especially since it's coated in liquid gasket at this point.

The other slightly fiddly operation is getting all the old plates out from the basket. I used a paperclip that I'd bent 2-3mm over at the end to hook the rear most ones out.

I had the Barnett clutch ready to go in. On the instructions they say soak the friction plates for at least 3 minutes. I just stuck them in a tub of oil before I started pulling everything apart and left them there till I was ready to stick them in.

Note the steal drive plates are oiled/greased with a thick oil and it's surprisingly easy to pick two up at once and not notice (could be my eyes + see comment above* ?).

And don't forget those 3 small springs behind the pressure plate. They're easy to miss-align. They're only held in place by a small nipple.

Everything is fairly straightforward and obvious (famous last words!) once you get in there to be honest.

I struggled re-seating the clutch cover once I'd finished everything and I'm keeping my fingers crossed I got a good seal that doesn't leak. This is mostly due to the brake and exhaust getting in the way. Re-seating the clutch cable on the cover, which sits behind the exhaust was also a bit of a pain - I ended up removing the heat shield just so's I could see a little more clearly.

Other than that and not being massively confident I've adjusted the clutch 100% correctly I'm relatively happy. Oh, while I was at it I pulled that stupid little clip off of the clutch lever - the thing that's supposed to make sure your clutch doesn't adjust itself - and I bent it a little so it's now more solidly against the adjuster wheel.

I took her for a blast around the block for 20 minutes and all seems well.

I took a few pics but I'm really not sure how helpful they'd be so I haven't bunged them up.

Cheers again Forum Folk! Now for a longer test ride…
 

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I can't really judge this from a professional point of view but this is the wear on two random plates at about 11,500kms:

OEM PLATES.png
 

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Thanks for the encouragement in this thread, and maybe a couple of others, all who have had something to say.

Did my long ride last weekend and the clutch was spinning a little when I was getting a bit over excited with the throttle. Good thing I found the time to rip into it and see if I could still remember how to use a spanner today.

It took me (a complete *rank-amateur, who was never that good when I did used to mess around in my Dad's garage all those years ago) 3 hours from warming the bike up to testing it in the yard. I was very careful and methodical. Working from pages I'd printed from the Workshop Manual and having already digested a couple of YouTube vids but anyone who is half confident shouldn't have a big problem doing this themselves.

The first tricky, and it really isn't that tricky, thing I encountered was actually getting the clutch case off. I was amazed at how many bells of shite I had to knock out of it before I was able to wobble it free from the bike.

Also, if I did this job again I'd remove the rear brake pedal and the lower part of the exhaust. I was wishing I had done this particularly when I was putting the clutch cover back in place - it's a tad fiddly, especially since it's coated in liquid gasket at this point.

The other slightly fiddly operation is getting all the old plates out from the basket. I used a paperclip that I'd bent 2-3mm over at the end to hook the rear most ones out.

I had the Barnett clutch ready to go in. On the instructions they say soak the friction plates for at least 3 minutes. I just stuck them in a tub of oil before I started pulling everything apart and left them there till I was ready to stick them in.

Note the steal drive plates are oiled/greased with a thick oil and it's surprisingly easy to pick two up at once and not notice (could be my eyes + see comment above* ?).

And don't forget those 3 small springs behind the pressure plate. They're easy to miss-align. They're only held in place by a small nipple.

Everything is fairly straightforward and obvious (famous last words!) once you get in there to be honest.

I struggled re-seating the clutch cover once I'd finished everything and I'm keeping my fingers crossed I got a good seal that doesn't leak. This is mostly due to the brake and exhaust getting in the way. Re-seating the clutch cable on the cover, which sits behind the exhaust was also a bit of a pain - I ended up removing the heat shield just so's I could see a little more clearly.

Other than that and not being massively confident I've adjusted the clutch 100% correctly I'm relatively happy. Oh, while I was at it I pulled that stupid little clip off of the clutch lever - the thing that's supposed to make sure your clutch doesn't adjust itself - and I bent it a little so it's now more solidly against the adjuster wheel.

I took her for a blast around the block for 20 minutes and all seems well.

I took a few pics but I'm really not sure how helpful they'd be so I haven't bunged them up.

Cheers again Forum Folk! Now for a longer test ride…
Good on you for having a go, seems the only thing you got wrong was spelling steel incorrectly. lol.
I often use an axle stand with a cloth on it and lay the bike over onto the stand placing the bar end in the 'V' of the stand. ( bars turned fully to the right ).
This allows you to do the clutch without draining the oil and makes fitting plates and engine covers etc. much easier as they're almost lying flat.
 

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Good on you for having a go, seems the only thing you got wrong was spelling steel incorrectly. lol.
I often use an axle stand with a cloth on it and lay the bike over onto the stand placing the bar end in the 'V' of the stand. ( bars turned fully to the right ).
This allows you to do the clutch without draining the oil and makes fitting plates and engine covers etc. much easier as they're almost lying flat.
A Ducati engineer mate of mine (lives too far away to be much help!) mentioned that as an option too. I was just a bit scared of damaging the bike and I decided for an extra 90 bucks on top of what I'd spent on tools and parts I'd whack new oil in there. I left the filter though!
 

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Hi all, I've gone through this exact issue, clutch slipping under power, I also thought it was clutch related.
It is BUT its not the main culprit.
It is the Clutch Springs on the Ducati Scrambler.
This MUST be an issue that Ducati is not telling anybody about.
There must have been a Torque setting at the Ducati Factory that was not set to 10Nm.
If the Clutch springs are not Torqued Correctly the Clutch plates do not hold and wear prematurely.
My ICON's clutch was toast at 7,700kms.
I ordered a new OEM clutch and installed it, set it to the same settings as OEM went for a test ride and under power the clutch still slipped!
This Baffled me and I asked a few Ducati Mechanic Friends, they said the Plates should basically be crushed to the basket.
Back to the Drawing Board I went, so I tightened the springs to 10Nm, adjust the the cable as per Manual settings.
And the problem is no more.

It is critical that the clutch springs are torqued correctly or the power of the engine wears the clutch plates.

Here is my video.
Hope this helps for other Scramblers who have this issue as I don't think its going away.

Cheers Dan.
 

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Good video for people to refer to, very helpful and clear, but:

There’s no way that putting extra torque on the spring bolt is giving you more squeeze on the spring.
The bolt is nipped to a hard stop against the post, only then should the torque wrench be used. The way you did it you were pushing against the resistance of the spring while
tightening, this can cause it to click off early giving a false reading, especially at low setting for 6mm etc. bolts. Or worse, not actually be against the stop/post (unlikely) but possible.
Your springs themselves seem to be the problem though.

ie. tightening to just before a bolt breaks does not alter where it is, it’s either against the post or it’s not.
 

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Good video for people to refer to, very helpful and clear, but:

There’s no way that putting extra torque on the spring bolt is giving you more squeeze on the spring.
The bolt is nipped to a hard stop against the post, only then should the torque wrench be used. The way you did it you were pushing against the resistance of the spring while
tightening, this can cause it to click off early giving a false reading, especially at low setting for 6mm etc. bolts. Or worse, not actually be against the stop/post (unlikely) but possible.
Your springs themselves seem to be the problem though.

ie. tightening to just before a bolt breaks does not alter where it is, it’s either against the post or it’s not.
I'm not sure how it came across but you should definitely NOT put extra torque on the spring bolts.
As I said 10Nm of torque should be used. Any more and you will snap the bolt.
DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN.
In the video I was not pushing against the springs. Initially I used a allen key to seat the bolts and the springs THEN I used a Torque wrench.

Where did i say tightening before bolt breaks???
Nobody should do that.

Cheers!
 

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I'm not sure how it came across but you should definitely NOT put extra torque on the spring bolts.
As I said 10Nm of torque should be used. Any more and you will snap the bolt.
DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN.
In the video I was not pushing against the springs. Initially I used a allen key to seat the bolts and the springs THEN I used a Torque wrench.

Where did i say tightening before bolt breaks???
Nobody should do that.

Cheers!
I didn't mean it as criticism, just pointing out tips and maybe help others.
I didn't say you said to tighten the bots until they broke. I said even if you did tighten until just before they break it will not put more tension on the springs. You are claiming by going from 5 to 10nm that somehow you have cured the clutch slip.
Your clutch slip could just be naturally worn out discs but in this case it's more likely they are a symptom caused by springs out of spec. Even then, looking at your friction disc segments I don't think they look out of spec.

In the video I watched, you started the bolts off using an Allen key. Then you torqued them up using a torque wrench.
What I saw was the torque wrench getting way too much turn on the bolt @4.36 which tells me they were not seated.

IF they had been nipped up to the shoulder the torque wrench would have clicked off almost right away.

I'm not getting into an argument about what you do on your bike but if you think by tightening a bolt onto a shoulder from 5nm up-to 10nm will give you more squeeze on an already wasted and worn out spring then crack on. ( as shown in your vid)
 

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I didn't mean it as criticism, just pointing out tips and maybe help others.
I didn't say you said to tighten the bots until they broke. I said even if you did tighten until just before they break it will not put more tension on the springs. You are claiming by going from 5 to 10nm that somehow you have cured the clutch slip.
Your clutch slip could just be naturally worn out discs but in this case it's more likely they are a symptom caused by springs out of spec. Even then, looking at your friction disc segments I don't think they look out of spec.

In the video I watched, you started the bolts off using an Allen key. Then you torqued them up using a torque wrench.
What I saw was the torque wrench getting way too much turn on the bolt @4.36 which tells me they were not seated.

IF they had been nipped up to the shoulder the torque wrench would have clicked off almost right away.

I'm not getting into an argument about what you do on your bike but if you think by tightening a bolt onto a shoulder from 5nm up-to 10nm will give you more squeeze on an already wasted and worn out spring then crack on. ( as shown in your vid)
No Probs mate, Not arguing either...
Just a little confused as to what you meant.
I just wanted to emphasise Springs need to be checked to Torque settings.
A lot of ppl including Ducati dealers sound like they have no idea.
If your Scrambler is melting clutch discs early, check springs first.
Hope this helps.
Cheers!
 
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