Ducati Scrambler Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2-26-DUCATI-SCRAMBLER-SIXTY2-1200x800.jpg
By Liane Yvkoff

With shorter inseams and smaller frames, many women have a harder time than men finding a motorcycle that fits their body. That’s one of the reasons that there aren’t as many women in the sport. Another is that a 800cc bike can seem dangerous and intimidating. Could a smaller motorcycle with less power that’s more comfortable to ride tempt more women out of vehicles with four wheels and onto two?

Ducati recently released the Scrambler Sixty2, a more affordable younger sibling to the Scrambler and new entry point into the Ducati brand. Powered by a 400cc engine, the manufacture is marketing it as a way to ease new riders into motorcycling without sacrificing looks, brand, or quality. At the same time, the Sixty2 is being promoted as an around-town bike; something of an all-purpose, “everyday” Scrambler in addition to that sport or cruiser in the garage. In some regions, it will be positioned as a tax-friendly mode of transport. That’s a lot of hats for a new motorcycle to wear, but here’s another one that the Sixty2 may try on: the female-friendly bike.

Its small engine, light frame, low seat, and comfortable ride position makes the Sixty2 well-positioned for a first time female motorcyclist–or any motorcyclist–who might be more interested in safety than speed. The seat height is 31.1 inches (30.3 inches with low seat), which makes it easier for riders to achieve feet-flat position at a stand-still, and with output of only 40-horsepower, novices aren’t given more power than they can easily handle.

That could be an attractive offering to female motorcyclists, who the Motorcycle Industry Council reports being more safety-conscious than men. Brands are courting the fairer sex into the sport by offering bikes more accommodating to female builds. Harley Davidson offers “Ultra Low” cruisers with shorter reach handlebars and smaller grips, and Honda has a range of lighter bikes with smaller displacement. This could be the reason that the MIC reports that cruisers are the bike of choice for 34% of women, followed by scooters (33 percent). Only 10 percent of women ride sport bikes. But their numbers are growing each year, and in 2014 made up 14% of the motorcycling community. That’s a good sign for Ducati, whose sport bike heritage may not resonate with the majority of women. But the Scrambler Sixty2 could change that.

“I’ve identified that women are concerned with looks and a motorcycle that performs well,” says CEO Jason Chinook about factors that compel female buyers, “not something that is an opportunity to brag about specs.”

Continue reading: Could Ducati's Scrambler Sixty2 Bring More Women Into Motorcycling?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
The Scrambler is my girls bike. She was a on an 09 GSXR 750 prior.

I dont think the US is the target market for the bike, especially when its only ~1k less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
With shorter inseams and smaller frames, many women have a harder time than men finding a motorcycle that fits their body. That’s one of the reasons that there aren’t as many women in the sport. Another is that a 800cc bike can seem dangerous and intimidating. Could a smaller motorcycle with less power that’s more comfortable to ride tempt more women out of vehicles with four wheels and onto two?​
Smaller frames, yes. Shorter inseams, not so much. I know plenty of women on Harleys, Monsters, Speed Triples, Bonnies, Royal Enfields, dual sports etc. I don't understand the usual stereotype that goes with "she's a girl, she want/should ride a smaller bike." Oh and don't get me started on motorcycle apparel where 80% of my choice is pink. We don't all like pink!! [/end rant] :oops:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Smaller frames, yes. Shorter inseams, not so much. I know plenty of women on Harleys, Monsters, Speed Triples, Bonnies, Royal Enfields, dual sports etc. I don't understand the usual stereotype that goes with "she's a girl, she want/should ride a smaller bike." Oh and don't get me started on motorcycle apparel where 80% of my choice is pink. We don't all like pink!! [/end rant] :oops:
Yeah, I think a more relevant question is whether it makes sense for new and possibly shorter riders. As mentioned above, in the US with there being no engine size limit for new riders, for ~$1k less than a regular Scrambler it doesn't make much financial sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,176 Posts
Agree with the above. Why 'gender' the issue. Its a matter of individual riders and how they feel regardless of having a penis or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
Hello

Last week, during my holidays in New York, I had the possibility to see the Sixty2 Scrambler in NY Ducati store.

I find it really cool, in terms of designs and colors, but I don't see why it would be more a bike for girls than the initial models. Its weight and size are identical to the 800cc model and managing the power is the same issue for boys and girls. It's not a matter of gender, but a matter of brain...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,035 Posts
Hmm it's kind of patronising to think that women would prefer a smaller, lighter, less powerful bike? For me it's about my size, stature and physical strength so smaller and lighter is a bonus for me, but less powerful, no way! I gave up my last bike because it didn't have enough grunt. There are plenty of men these comments would apply to as well. I'm not sure a bike 'aimed at women' would be a good thing either for the manufacturers - as it may put men off from buying what is perceived to be a womens' bike and they take up the largest share of the market. My first 'big' bike was a Suzuki Gladius, it's a perfectly good bike in it's own right but was derided by many males as being 'too girly'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
I believe it will / already is.

My girlfriend for instance.
She went to do her CBT a few years ago now (before I met her) and from what I gather, she was given pretty poor training by her instructor. She had been told that the gearbox on the 125 she was practising on had a 2 down, 3 up shift pattern (ie, down once for 1st gear, down a second time for 2nd gear, then up once for 3rd etc ...) consequently she fell off 3 times in the practice yard and got `the fear' and vowed never to ride a bike again.

Since I got my Full Throttle, I haven't been able to keep her off the back of it, and she is finding the love for bikes again and starting to build a little more confidence and consider going through her CBT. full bike license again. The main driving factor for her wanting her to gain her bike licence is predominantly due to her loving the looks and styling of the Sixty2!

So what if the Sixty2 is a girly bike.
So what if it's styling is considered girly.
So what if it's marketed mainly towards women.
If it get's more women in to biking than would normally do so, then all the better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,176 Posts
I believe it will / already is.

My girlfriend for instance.
She went to do her CBT a few years ago now (before I met her) and from what I gather, she was given pretty poor training by her instructor. She had been told that the gearbox on the 125 she was practising on had a 2 down, 3 up shift pattern (ie, down once for 1st gear, down a second time for 2nd gear, then up once for 3rd etc ...) consequently she fell off 3 times in the practice yard and got `the fear' and vowed never to ride a bike again.

Since I got my Full Throttle, I haven't been able to keep her off the back of it, and she is finding the love for bikes again and starting to build a little more confidence and consider going through her CBT. full bike license again. The main driving factor for her wanting her to gain her bike licence is predominantly due to her loving the looks and styling of the Sixty2!

So what if the Sixty2 is a girly bike.
So what if it's styling is considered girly.
So what if it's marketed mainly towards women.
If it get's more women in to biking than would normally do so, then all the better.

That's the thing though... Replace the word 'girlfriend' with 'boyfriend' and what you're saying still makes pefect sense, ergo, why bring gender into it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
My wife love the scrambler and will probably trade in her ninja 300 for it soon, her main concern is the seat height, while she hopping on different scrambler model included the sixty2 she found the seat height is higher and much harder to tip toe on compared to the classic, on the spec sheet it says the sixty2 is only 10 lbs lighter so it doesn't make much different when sitting on it, is there anyway the seat can be lower on any of the scrambler model?

Sent from my SM-G928C using Tapatalk
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top