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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's happened twice now. Traveling in a straight line at approx. 75 mph and bounce over a bit of crappy pavement. Rapid handle bar shake - four or five osculations. It settles down on its own, but the sphincter factor is a high five. I've been riding sport bikes for forty years, and have had my share of tank slappers, but not in a straight line, and not without asking for it. Anybody else out there experienced this?
 

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It's the crappy front suspension - causes brief tank slappers for me all the time. Only happens at relatively high speed when you hit a pretty big pothole or bump.
 

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I ride hard and fast and always hitting large bumps or holes and never once had this so I would not go blaming front suspension.
 

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I ride hard and fast and always hitting large bumps or holes and never once had this so I would not go blaming front suspension.
Seriously??

Tank slappers are ALWAYS caused by suspension issues - nothing else.
 

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Seriously??

Tank slappers are ALWAYS caused by suspension issues - nothing else.
Well you learn something new every day. I have only owned budget bikes with stock suspension in my 12 years of riding and I have never had a tank slapper so thats were my assumption came from :)
 

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Well you learn something new every day. I have only owned budget bikes with stock suspension in my 12 years of riding and I have never had a tank slapper so thats were my assumption came from :)
Let me clarify...

A "tank-slapper" or "speed wobble" occurs when the front tire becomes airborne, then regains traction again outside the rear wheel's alignment. Imagine a small rock sliding under your tire raising the wheel off the pavement and physically turning your front wheel ever so slightly before it regains traction - same type of condition.

It puts into motion a steering oscillation that is basically the same as the wobble of a grocery cart wheel. This condition is pretty much always caused by something in the front end, although a too soft condition in the rear can also contribute. Sportbikes are much more prone to this because of the very small amount of rake. Steering head dampers can help, but its no substitute for proper suspension performance.

Of course, the same thing can happen when performing a wheelie, but my original reply was not based on intentional scenarios.
 

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Let me clarify...

A "tank-slapper" or "speed wobble" occurs when the front tire becomes airborne, then regains traction again outside the rear wheel's alignment. Imagine a small rock sliding under your tire raising the wheel off the pavement and physically turning your front wheel ever so slightly before it regains traction - same type of condition.

It puts into motion a steering oscillation that is basically the same as the wobble of a grocery cart wheel. This condition is pretty much always caused by something in the front end, although a too soft condition in the rear can also contribute. Sportbikes are much more prone to this because of the very small amount of rake. Steering head dampers can help, but its no substitute for proper suspension performance.

Of course, the same thing can happen when performing a wheelie, but my original reply was not based on intentional scenarios.
I have had the shopping trolley slapper many times but was able to get control fairly quickly ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
For those of you who are lucky enough to have not experienced this bit of excitement. Put down the mouse and go get yourself a lottery ticket - your karma account is full. As for me, I'm wondering if a steering dampener would be a quick patch until a fork replacement comes along.
 

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For those of you who are lucky enough to have not experienced this bit of excitement. Put down the mouse and go get yourself a lottery ticket - your karma account is full. As for me, I'm wondering if a steering dampener would be a quick patch until a fork replacement comes along.
Two "fork replacements" already exist...

Andreani Adjustabale Hydraulic Cartridge Kit for Low Fork Ducati Ducati Scrambler 800 15 - 105 D15 -

GP Suspension Products Supersport Cartridges

Both require installation by an experienced technician.
 

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I've had it happen a couple of times, but only one spooked me, and that was when I was passing a semi-truck. That's the only one that was semi-dramatic (pun not intended) and unsettling. The few other times it was barely noticeable. So only one spooky one with 5k miles under my belt on this bike. It's not a huge issue for me, but yeah, it is an issue I wish wasn't there. I do plan on dealing with the suspension, but not this season. I've already spent enough.
 

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I have the Ohlins rear shock but the front forks are still an issue. I'm wondering if we could find existing forks from another model that have the right specs or could be easily adapted.

Ducati is selling enough Scramblers to make it worthwhile to find solutions. The existing aftermarket cartridges are obviously a possible fix, just wondering if there will be better options.
 

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The front is a bit too stiff for the road, and I've had a fair few wobbles on bumpy lanes. For me it makes the ride exciting, and at lower speeds than a sportsbike. Having said that, a fork upgrade is still on the shopping list :)
 

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Getting a new rear shock has really helped with the front wobble I'd sometimes get on decel or going over bumps, but the front suspension is still too hard for my liking. More than likely I'm going to be purchasing the fork upgrade pretty soon because I have a taste now to what good suspension really is, and I'd like to finish what I started. ;)
 

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Not one wobble here and have ridden hard over some rough surfaces. In fact the bike feels super stable on good roads, I once had a 100mph off on my gsxr via a tank slapper! Went over a small dip in the road (both wheels in the air) and when the bike landed it erupted into a massive tank slapper (due to steep rake and probably the front wheel not been straight) it broke my wrist and then threw me and the bike to meet Tarmac and decided to break my collar bone. Not the nicest experience but the gsxr would buck and slap all the time over certain surfaces which made the ride exciting but caught me out in the end:boxing-22:
 

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Apparently one man's "hard and fast" is another's peaceful ride in the country... :05.18-flustered:
 

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Is it possible that some forks are softer than others? (tolerances) as my bike so far has been super stable and feels really firm but never harsh.
 

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Is it possible that some forks are softer than others? (tolerances) as my bike so far has been super stable and feels really firm but never harsh.
It's much more likely that some riders are "softer" than others. :02.47-tranquillity:

Individual weight, riding styles, road conditions all play a part. If you weigh over 200 lbs, and have to ride on the terrible roads we have around here, you would see it sooner than later.
 
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