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It's the crappy front suspension - causes brief tank slappers for me all the time. Only happens at relatively high speed when you hit a pretty big pothole or bump.
 

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I ride hard and fast and always hitting large bumps or holes and never once had this so I would not go blaming front suspension.
Seriously??

Tank slappers are ALWAYS caused by suspension issues - nothing else.
 

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Well you learn something new every day. I have only owned budget bikes with stock suspension in my 12 years of riding and I have never had a tank slapper so thats were my assumption came from :)
Let me clarify...

A "tank-slapper" or "speed wobble" occurs when the front tire becomes airborne, then regains traction again outside the rear wheel's alignment. Imagine a small rock sliding under your tire raising the wheel off the pavement and physically turning your front wheel ever so slightly before it regains traction - same type of condition.

It puts into motion a steering oscillation that is basically the same as the wobble of a grocery cart wheel. This condition is pretty much always caused by something in the front end, although a too soft condition in the rear can also contribute. Sportbikes are much more prone to this because of the very small amount of rake. Steering head dampers can help, but its no substitute for proper suspension performance.

Of course, the same thing can happen when performing a wheelie, but my original reply was not based on intentional scenarios.
 

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For those of you who are lucky enough to have not experienced this bit of excitement. Put down the mouse and go get yourself a lottery ticket - your karma account is full. As for me, I'm wondering if a steering dampener would be a quick patch until a fork replacement comes along.
Two "fork replacements" already exist...

Andreani Adjustabale Hydraulic Cartridge Kit for Low Fork Ducati Ducati Scrambler 800 15 - 105 D15 -

GP Suspension Products Supersport Cartridges

Both require installation by an experienced technician.
 

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Apparently one man's "hard and fast" is another's peaceful ride in the country... :05.18-flustered:
 

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Is it possible that some forks are softer than others? (tolerances) as my bike so far has been super stable and feels really firm but never harsh.
It's much more likely that some riders are "softer" than others. :02.47-tranquillity:

Individual weight, riding styles, road conditions all play a part. If you weigh over 200 lbs, and have to ride on the terrible roads we have around here, you would see it sooner than later.
 

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I would check the neck bearings for tightness before I would worry about the fork suspension causing a wobble.
If it was his steering bearings he would have known about it long before hitting a bump at speed.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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The only time in my over 40 years of riding that a tank slapper occurred was due to my rear brake pads disintegrating at speed on my KZ900 caused the rear end to wobble out of control and for some reason I decided to apply hard front brake and that stopped me from crashing at over 100 MPH. So it DEFINITELY was not the front forks that caused the issue.
Rear end wobble is NOT considered a tank-slapper, it's commonly known as a "high-speed weave".
 

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I agree with this.
I have never known another bike that has thrown up so many positive and negative views about the suspension. On the road my scrambler forks behave better than the fully adjustable showas on my last 3 Ducati's. The rear shock as new gave as good performance as my Ohlins did in the monster. After 3500kms the forks are still fine but I'll admit the shock is starting to fade in high temperatures. So i think this "budget" suspension varies significantly from bike to bike. Mine is definitely different from the test bike I took out. That is less precise and less damped than mine.
Suspension performance will differ depending on a bewildering number of variables. A given riders weight, the road conditions, the degree of aggressiveness that the rider is capable of subjecting the bike to, the ambient temperature, etc.

But I can say this - without any risk of mistake - there is no way on gods green earth that this $34 dollar shock and those forks perform ANYWHERE near as well as an adjustable Showa fork or Ohlins shock.

At the end of the day, if the bike performs the way you want - and with the way you ride - than that is all that matters. If it ain't broke (for you) no need to fix it.
 

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But they do Tony. Amazing isn't it.
Let's just say they perform that way for "you" - and like I stated before, that should be all that matters.

For MANY others, this simply is not the case.
 

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Tony, I'll buy your old used $34 shock for $25 plus shipping to Aus if you want to get rid of it, be nice to have a spare when mine eventually wears out.
Tell you what... You pay for shipping to AUS, you can have it for free!
 
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