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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
on the fence of getting a Sixty2. I started riding dirt bikes this summer and am riding a 300cc 2 stroke. I also took a 2 day motorcycle class and with the 60 miles of street riding I have done so far, feel pretty comfortable.

I do like the sound and feel of power but have no plans to go fast. Think like 80mph if that max. Mainly city riding, not much highway or long distance.

Would I really be underwhelmed with the Sixty2? Safety is what’s most important, it seems like simple science having less power equals more safety.
 

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Power pretty much has nothing to do with safety in my opinion but I'm sure others will disagree.

What makes a bike beginner friendly is:
- Ease of use
- Power delivery
- Safety systems
- The rider's own common sense

I think the Sixty2 is massively overpriced, considering the 800 is only a little more money but they remove a lot of nicer quality parts.

The 800 will not be vastly more demanding than a Sixty2, the ergonomics, size and weight are basically identical and I think that matters most. The bike will only go as fast as you tell it to and if you can't control your speed, a Sixty2 is just as dangerous as the 800.

If you're comfortable riding off road on an 300cc dirtbike, I suspect your bike control is fine. Most of riding on the road is learning roadcraft, basically seeing danger coming and being ready for it. Sportsbikes make this hard as visibility is lower and they are more difficult at slow speeds but all the Scrambler's are quite easy to ride.

It's not the speed of the Sixty2 that's underwhelming, just the quality compared to the 800. (cheaper brakes, suspension, swingarm, exhaust... etc.. )
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Power pretty much has nothing to do with safety in my opinion but I'm sure others will disagree.

What makes a bike beginner friendly is:
- Ease of use
- Power delivery
- Safety systems
- The rider's own common sense

I think the Sixty2 is massively overpriced, considering the 800 is only a little more money but they remove a lot of nicer quality parts.

The 800 will not be vastly more demanding than a Sixty2, the ergonomics, size and weight are basically identical and I think that matters most. The bike will only go as fast as you tell it to and if you can't control your speed, a Sixty2 is just as dangerous as the 800.

If you're comfortable riding off road on an 300cc dirtbike, I suspect your bike control is fine. Most of riding on the road is learning roadcraft, basically seeing danger coming and being ready for it. Sportsbikes make this hard as visibility is lower and they are more difficult at slow speeds but all the Scrambler's are quite easy to ride.

It's not the speed of the Sixty2 that's underwhelming, just the quality compared to the 800. (cheaper brakes, suspension, swingarm, exhaust... etc.. )
Totally see your point and agree. great reply. I do have decent clutch/power control, right now my weakness is speed, not comfortable on any bike going really fast and not comfortable going fast downhill. Assume those things wouldn’t matter much between either bikes since weight and size are about the same.
 

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Totally see your point and agree. great reply. I do have decent clutch/power control, right now my weakness is speed, not comfortable on any bike going really fast and not comfortable going fast downhill. Assume those things wouldn’t matter much between either bikes since weight and size are about the same.
The Scrambler is a great bike. It cruises very easily. You’ll find doing 60mph+ is a very different experience than it was on that 200cc learner bike or off road.

if you do go for it, enjoy!
 

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Totally see your point and agree. great reply. I do have decent clutch/power control, right now my weakness is speed, not comfortable on any bike going really fast and not comfortable going fast downhill. Assume those things wouldn’t matter much between either bikes since weight and size are about the same.
If you're not comfortable going really fast, just don't go really fast and you'll be fine ;)
 

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You're not going to want to go 80+ on either a 800 or sixty2. Air is not your friend on a naked bike.

The sweet spot for this bike is about 55 to 65. An 800 is not going to rip your face off with its power.

I think if you're asking this question, you already know you will regret getting the sixty2. Get the 800 and be happy.
 
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Totally see your point and agree. great reply. I do have decent clutch/power control, right now my weakness is speed, not comfortable on any bike going really fast and not comfortable going fast downhill. Assume those things wouldn’t matter much between either bikes since weight and size are about the same.
Seems to me you're worrying too much about the numbers shown on the speedo. I'd say do what most people do and get out of the built-up restricted zone into the countryside, cover up (stop looking at) the speedo and ride at the speed that feels best. Don't ride to suit a gauge unless of course you plan wringing it's neck.
 

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Get the 800. The smaller bike is not a bargain. No one ever said I wish I had a little less power. I find that my 2020 Icon cruises very comfortably anywhere from 60 mph to 80 mph. You do get moved around slightly more at higher speed, think of a kite, but it is not unnerving. My dealer recently sold his last 60 and said he would not restock it because it is a poor value compared to the 800's. If you can handle a 300- I n the dirt, the 800m will be a dream on the pavement. Life is short, buy the, damn bike!
 

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Yeah, the Sixty2 will be very disappointing within a week (or even less) if you can handle a 300c 2 stroke...
My thoughts exactly. I like the nimbleness of a 150 for 50/50 trail 2-lane road riding. If you are used to tooling around in a 300cc dirt bike the 800cc Scrambler will be EASY.
 
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Actually, If you are used to tooling around on a 300cc two stroke dirt bike the 800cc Scrambler may actually feel very lame...
 

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Photocycler, seems you ended up choosing the Sixty2 over all this advice above to go with the 800cc... what was your reasoning in the end? (Like you I have a dirt bike background, but I'm pretty happy with the 400cc for the road.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Price, got too good of a deal on the Sixty2 to pass it up. Also being my 1st street bike I thought it would be best to start with a smaller bike.

I do sometimes have regrets as it would be nice to have some harder acceleration, but I just remind myself that for what I’m doing now with the bike this bike is great.
 

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meh i've had a sixty2 for 2 years now with no regrets. still love it. my bike did come with a bunch of upgrades though (front/rear shocks, exhaust, etc).
 
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