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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, new here. Looking for feedback from some experienced scrambler riders....

After completing the basic MSF course, I might have made an impulse purchase on my first bike. There was a sale going on for left over 2018 icon's that put them around the same price point as a sixy 2. I went with the Icon thinking that I'd out grown the sixty 2 within a year and the Icon would be better for any highway riding. I understand it's not a good starter bike because of the price and potential of a drop but I thought fuck it, this is what i want, i don't want to deal with buying and selling another bike to start out on.

Being a new rider, the dealer wouldn't allow me to test ride any bikes so I really have no clue as to the responsiveness of the throttle. Bike arrives in a couple of days and I'm a bit worried I'm in over my head. I have very little dirt bike or motorcycle experience, but have driven standard car my whole life and rode mopeds quite a bit (not really sure if that count's for anything) So am i going to accidentally pop the clutch with a little too much throttle and wheelie this thing out of control, smashing my dumbass into smithereens?

I think a solution could be to detune the bike and then when I feel comfortable switch it back ....So effectively I would be riding a sixty 2 for a short time while i get more skills under my belt. Is it possible to detune a 2018 icon with out causing any damage to the motor?

TLDR; I'm a beginner, want to reduce the power on a 2018 Icon for learning purposes, is it possible?
 

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The throttle on Icons is a bit urgent and I imagine could be a bit of a handful (see what I did there) for beginners.

Rather than detuning, which might be expensive to do and to reverse later, maybe try a throttle tamer first. Basically a modified throttle tube that pulls less cable and slows down the response.

Shouldn't cost more than $100 and would be easy to change back.

bm
 

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There isn't really anyway to 'detune' the engine, not without spending a fortune.

The Scrambler isn't exactly a superbike, if you're sensible it shouldn't be anymore problematic than the 400. It's still a low, pretty light bike.

Good news for you, the Scrambler has a famously snatchy and responsive throttle but they dumbed that down from 2017 onwards, with a slightly different throttle cam. So this should help you out a lot.

I think you'll be fine. The 800 scrambler is still a pretty decent beginner bike.

How about a set of these for piece of mind? Should limit damage to the bike in the event of a clumsy drop:

SW-MOTECH Crash Bars Ducati Scrambler 2015-2019 - RevZilla
 

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The Icon is probably a bit heavier than the bikes you rode in the MSF course, but with the newer throttle cam it shouldn't be any harder to ride. The engine is powerful but very friendly. Do some practice as you did for the MSF course and you'll quickly get comfortable with the bike.
 

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Much like you, I only rode 125cc scooters for a couple of years before I obtained my license (on March this year) for "big bikes", and much like you I said "fuck it, I'll get what I want" and got a 2019 Icon as my first bike. As a beginer rider (5'7 & 150lb) this is my experience:

- Power won't be an issue. I have never been even close from an accidental wheelie so unless you have the dexterity of a rock, I think you'll be fine.

- I am not proud of this but I have already dropped the bike twice getting out of narrow parking spot both times, but managed to hold it long enough so it didn't slam too hard. The first time the clutch foot lever bent a bit (repairing it cost me no money) and the second time I bent my front brake lever (got a new one). The rest of the bike didn't suffer any damage but I now have the evotech crash protectors and rizoma handlebar ends.

- The bike is very easy to move around when moving, gets into corners really well and you can put it in any line you want with minimal effort.

- For a fairly short and not so strong rider like me, the bike height and weight are fantastic compared to some of the alternatives I was thinking about (XSR700, Triumph Street Scrambler...)

- Its the only bike I've had but I think it has a poor turning angle (when parking it or pushing it around that is), so careful with that.

If I am having a blast with it, I am sure you also will.

Hope this helps!
 

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Don't spend money on a throttle tamer, a 2017 Scrambler and beyond already come with one from the factory....


Oh, and spend the first few days on your low speed kills, so you feel comfortable doing U-turns, sharp turns from standstill, slaloms, etc.... (remember, little rear brake, clutch in the friction zone and a smidgen of throttle).

Once you apply all you were taught at you MSF, you'll be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just want to say thanks for all your input, i really appreciate it.

I got the bike today and after practicing clutch control in the drive way/yard for 20-30 minutes I felt pretty good about taking it out. This bike is a breeze to ride not nearly as difficult as i thought it might be. I had ordered the throttle tamer and frame sliders (crash bars weren't in the budget) but the throttle tamer is definitely not necessary. The power on this thing is easily controllable, (unless you have the dexterity of a rock). During the MSF class i had ridden a honda 250 nighthawk and it didn't feel much harder than that other than maneuvering the extra weight around in the parking lot.

I guess it goes to show that displacement isn't the best measuring stick when it comes to determining a good starter bike. There are too many other variables at play.

When it comes to dropping a bike i will say that having good traction with your boots when you move the bike around is important. Being 6' tall and 185lbs i couldn't see myself dropping it at low speeds it unless my feet slipped out on the grass or gravel

I feel like the sixty 2 is a waste of money and most people could start out on an Icon after taking the MSF class.
 

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When it comes to dropping a bike i will say that having good traction with your boots when you move the bike around is important. Being 6' tall and 185lbs i couldn't see myself dropping it at low speeds it unless my feet slipped out on the grass or gravel
Just be wary of that front brake when doing slow maneuvers - it can easily throw you off balance
 
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