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Used a Ducati OEM filter and had no leaks. It only took three quarts to refill. I think the 3.7 spec may be a for a dry engine. The magnetic plug had a fine coating of particles but the mesh screen was perfectly clean. I'm headed to the dealer for a brake hose recall later this week and I'll find out how much they want to reset the service indicator on the dash. Thanks again to all forum readers who gave input on this topic. The task went smoothly and I knew just what to expect.
 

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Used a Ducati OEM filter and had no leaks. It only took three quarts to refill. I think the 3.7 spec may be a for a dry engine. The magnetic plug had a fine coating of particles but the mesh screen was perfectly clean. I'm headed to the dealer for a brake hose recall later this week and I'll find out how much they want to reset the service indicator on the dash. Thanks again to all forum readers who gave input on this topic. The task went smoothly and I knew just what to expect.
Yes, the "3.7L" capacity is the total capacity for a dry motor, assembled on the bench. That's the same as it's been with almost all the Pantah-based belt-driven OHC engines since the 1970s.
 

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Just so you know, the oil drain plug strips very easily which I found out in the middle of an oil change. Not the threads but the screw head. i was able to drain the oil through the side plug and do the change. I asked my dealer about it and they told me not to worry as it's pretty typical and they'd get it out at my 7500 mile service. I figured better them than me because if they screw up the cases it's on them, not me. All in all it's an easy job. They also turned off my 600 mile service light when they did the kick stand recall as I had bought the oil and filter from them.

I can't imagine paying $260 for an oil change. The 7500 mile service at the Rhode Island dealer I use is $450 tops. I've heard of a lot of dealers banging customers for in the $900 range which is pretty nuts for a simple air cooled bike. I'm too old and lazy to learn how to service desmodromic valves or I'd do this service myself too.
 

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Glad I found this as still undecided about changing oil for winter storage,only had first service 200 miles ago and will only do another couple of hundred this season . Is 20 nm the go to value for the drain plug or should I go by feel. Never done an oil change before and am now a bit nervous about stripping bolt.
 

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Just so you know, the oil drain plug strips very easily which I found out in the middle of an oil change. Not the threads but the screw head. i was able to drain the oil through the side plug and do the change. I asked my dealer about it and they told me not to worry as it's pretty typical and they'd get it out at my 7500 mile service. I figured better them than me because if they screw up the cases it's on them, not me. All in all it's an easy job. They also turned off my 600 mile service light when they did the kick stand recall as I had bought the oil and filter from them.

I can't imagine paying $260 for an oil change. The 7500 mile service at the Rhode Island dealer I use is $450 tops. I've heard of a lot of dealers banging customers for in the $900 range which is pretty nuts for a simple air cooled bike. I'm too old and lazy to learn how to service desmodromic valves or I'd do this service myself too.
I'm not so sure that if the drain plug head/threads fail that it would be down to the dealer unless they did something wrong and caused the fail, I think the customer would still have to foot the bill for the repair as they would a broken bolt on an exhaust clamp for example.
Out of warranty that is.
 

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Quick question. Changed oil at weekend and bike only took 2.5l to bring up to the max line as per thedoc46 experience previous post. Started the engine for a minute and let the oil settle and it was now below the minimum mark. Would this cause any damage to the engine?
 

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No, you're fine. In fact, doing what you did is exactly what you should do. Drain the old oil, and replace the filter. Fill with new oil. Then run the engine. During that time, the new oil will circulate throughout the engine and fill the new oil filter, so the level of new oil sitting in the oil pan will drop a bit. Then you top it off. For bikes like ours, with filters at or near the bottom of the engine anyways, some people will pre-fill the new filter with some (not brim full) oil. This way the amount of time without full oil pressure as the new oil is distributed throughout the engine and filing the new filter is lessened. It's not really that big a deal, though as long as you top off afterword as you did.
 

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Great walkthrough post. Was able to complete my first DIY oil change thanks to the post and a YouTube walkthrough as my secondary reference. I did run into few problems but at the end was mission accomplished. Here are my thoughts after this experience:
  • Filter mesh refused to come out. Did anyone run into that problem? I didn't want to damage the mesh so I left it as is. Since the mesh doesn't need to be cleaned every time, I will have the shop take a look at my next oil change.

  • The disassemble and assemble exhaust pipes part took half the time of the entire oil change. This wasn't mentioned here or other resources I found, putting the exhaust pipes back was quite difficult in my case. I had such a hard time attaching one of the springs back I eventually gave up. Again, going to ask the guys at the shop do it for me on my next visit.

  • I don't want to have to deal with removing and putting back the exhaust pipes but I like working on my bike. I will continue doing my own oil change minus the filter mesh part. So every now and then I will need to pay the shop a visit for a proper oil change.
 
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