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Ducati have sold 32,600 motorcycles in the first six months of 2015 - an increase of 22% - leading to an all-time sales record for the Italian manufacturer.

The biggest percentage insreases were recorded in Italy (+51%), followed by Spain (+38%), the UK (+36%), Germany (+24%) and France (+23%). The USA is Ducati's leading market, with sales rising by 10%.

9000 Ducati Scramblers have been sold so far this year, alongside 4700 Multistradas, 3700 Monster 821s and 3000 Panigales.
 

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I'm guessing we'll start to see many other "higher end" companies start to produce a decent model at a decent price. Wouldn't be surprised if BMW was next.
 

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I'm guessing we'll start to see many other "higher end" companies start to produce a decent model at a decent price. Wouldn't be surprised if BMW was next.
Nor would I given they've already made the announcement ;)
 

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9000 Ducati Scramblers have been sold so far this year, alongside 4700 Multistradas, 3700 Monster 821s and 3000 Panigales.
Interesting sales figures when you look at the model mix for a company that is supposedly focussed on sports bikes, and launched the Scrambler as a 'stand alone' brand in case it wasn't accepted by the Ducatisti.

Remove Scramblers from the numbers and what you're actually looking at is a decline in Ducati sales, which must be concerning for dealers as they have reduced margins in the Scrambler. I'd bet on a price increase for 2016 on the Scrambler models.
 

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I think they will keep the prices in check.. The money they will be making is from servicing all the units. Ducati service is usually twice or thrice the price of other dealers.
 

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I think they will keep the prices in check.
If the 2016 pricing of the new BMW base models with the old air/oil engines and the Triumph Bonneville models give Ducati the chance to squeeze a few more $ / £'s onto the prices, they'll take it, I'm sure.
 

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Obviously the Scrambler is a super success. Do you think the entry level price of the Scrambler might take some first time Ducati buyers away from some of Ducati's lower end sports bikes? Do you think any of those type of buyers will want to step up into a higher performance machine or is it attracting an audience that would not be interested in Ducati sportsbikes at all?
 

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Obviously the Scrambler is a super success. Do you think the entry level price of the Scrambler might take some first time Ducati buyers away from some of Ducati's lower end sports bikes? Do you think any of those type of buyers will want to step up into a higher performance machine or is it attracting an audience that would not be interested in Ducati sportsbikes at all?
Not 100% sure, my gut feeling is that it's due to the style of bike and the fact that it happened to be Ducati that had the balls to make it is just a bonus.
It's a budget price compared to other Ducatis' but not compared to other 'budget' bikes yet a fair number of people have chosen to wait for it.
Also there shouldn't be the "oh you bought the cheap Ducati" as there's not a line up of others of the same style. Panigale and Monster for example. Porsche Boxter etc.
I wonder if timing played a hand, would it have took off ten years ago ?

Why did you ask such a difficult question to answer ??
 

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Obviously the Scrambler is a super success. Do you think the entry level price of the Scrambler might take some first time Ducati buyers away from some of Ducati's lower end sports bikes? Do you think any of those type of buyers will want to step up into a higher performance machine or is it attracting an audience that would not be interested in Ducati sportsbikes at all?
It's easy for me to answer - I didn't buy the Scrambler because it was 'cheap', I bought it because it's the only bike I've seen and tried and love the look of, that suits me almost perfectly. Plus it was £2500 dearer than the MT07 I was about to buy!
I didn't buy it because it was Ducati either, I don't really have any feelings about Ducati as a marque! Well I didn't, but have now bought a jacket with 'Ducati' on the back :D:D
Neither would I want to buy a Ducati sports bike, I have no interest in them - did want a Monster as my first bike, but changed my mind as soon as I sat on one :confused:
 

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I bought the Scrambler because of the following:
  • Size - I favor middleweights, and good ones are rare - in the US, anyway.
  • Motor - Wanted an air-cooled v-twin
  • Weight - 400 lbs is the "sweet" spot
  • Simplicity - Wanted as basic a motorcycle as possible
  • Looks - Classic motorcycle looks - as opposed to some alien spacecraft
I've been waiting 20 years for someone to build this bike - didn't want it to be Ducati, but they did it - so be it. The performance of this little bike is a bonus, having 75hp on tap - with the low weight - is wonderful. The suspension is garbage, but I knew that "going in", and it is easily rectified.

This bike will not be a "stepping-stone" to any other offering from Ducati for me. I have other performance-oriented options already available. I love the bike so far, very few complaints, but I'm not enamored with Ducati's "persuasive" efforts to have everything done at a dealership. The inability to reset the service indicators are major source of annoyance for me.
 
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It's easy for me to answer - I didn't buy the Scrambler because it was 'cheap', I bought it because it's the only bike I've seen and tried and love the look of, that suits me almost perfectly. Plus it was £2500 dearer than the MT07 I was about to buy!
I didn't buy it because it was Ducati either, I don't really have any feelings about Ducati as a marque! Well I didn't, but have now bought a jacket with 'Ducati' on the back :D:D
Neither would I want to buy a Ducati sports bike, I have no interest in them - did want a Monster as my first bike, but changed my mind as soon as I sat on one :confused:
I bought the Scrambler because of the following:
  • Size - I favor middleweights, and good ones are rare - in the US, anyway.
  • Motor - Wanted an air-cooled v-twin
  • Weight - 400 lbs is the "sweet" spot
  • Simplicity - Wanted as basic a motorcycle as possible
  • Looks - Classic motorcycle looks - as opposed to some alien spacecraft
I've been waiting 20 years for someone to build this bike - didn't want it to be Ducati, but they did it - so be it. The performance of this little bike is a bonus, having 75hp on tap - with the low weight - is wonderful. The suspension is garbage, but I knew that "going in", and it is easily rectified.

This bike will not be a "stepping-stone" to any other offering from Ducati for me. I have other performance-oriented options already available. I love the bike so far, very few complaints, but I'm not enamored with Ducati's "persuasive" efforts to have everything done at a dealership. The inability to reset the service indicators are major source of annoyance for me.
Your two posts kind of underline what I was thinking, it didn't need to be a Ducati it's just that they nailed it.
You are quite right, personally I don't think 7-8 grand is cheap at all. The MT07 is meant to be a really good bike but it hasn't got what the Wee Scrambler has, the problem is, none of us seem to know what it is it's got. Obviously whatever it is must cost around £2500
 

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didn't NEED to be a Ducati
No... I actually would have preferred almost any other "major" manufacturer...

I'm totally not a fan of the the Desmo stuff. I'm an engineer, and realize why it had a performance advantage (over more "conventional" valve trains) at one time (and for a short time at that), but that was many years ago. Now, there's ZERO performance advantage, only the disadvantages of added complexity and increased maintenance.
 

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I don't think it's particularly nostalgia, or retro, land of joy or whatever term the marketing hype and media want to put on it. But, there has been a pent up demand for this type of bike for some time, whilst manufacturers chased higher perfromance and greater technology, resulting in many riders just feeling a bit cold about the latest and greatest offerings.

Most everyday riders realise that they do not have the skill (or even desire) to ride a 180 bhp bike at anywhere near it's limit, and if they do there are serious risks involved in doing so safely on public roads. To ride such bikes at more realistic day to day speeds is a bit of a flat experience, you're not so much a rider as a passenger.

Enter bikes such as the Scrambler, light punchy, quick, loads of fun to ride, no techno wizardry, just a plain, old school, no frills honest bike. Equally fun to ride if your a newbie or a long term experienced rider. A simple blank canvas which you can make into your own version of perfect and enjoy doing it.

Triumph have been sellingg such a bike for 15 years now in the Bonneville, and like Ducati's Scrambler, the various Bonnie's are Triumphs best sellers, whilst being far from their best bikes. Heavier and slower than the Scrambler, I wouldn't want to sell mine, but ride the Scrambler and it definitely feels like the new, young kid on the block.

BMW made a cock up with the Nine-T in my opinion, too complicated, too confused and too expensive. It'll be interesting to see if they can regain some ground with the new range of 'basic' bikes that's mooted to be coming for 2016.

Meanwhile, Ducati seem to have re-found the formula that made the original Monster such a hit, and long may it continue.
 

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I don't think it's particularly nostalgia, or retro, land of joy or whatever term the marketing hype and media want to put on it. But, there has been a pent up demand for this type of bike for some time, whilst manufacturers chased higher perfromance and greater technology, resulting in many riders just feeling a bit cold about the latest and greatest offerings.

Most everyday riders realise that they do not have the skill (or even desire) to ride a 180 bhp bike at anywhere near it's limit, and if they do there are serious risks involved in doing so safely on public roads. To ride such bikes at more realistic day to day speeds is a bit of a flat experience, you're not so much a rider as a passenger.

Enter bikes such as the Scrambler, light punchy, quick, loads of fun to ride, no techno wizardry, just a plain, old school, no frills honest bike. Equally fun to ride if your a newbie or a long term experienced rider. A simple blank canvas which you can make into your own version of perfect and enjoy doing it.

Triumph have been sellingg such a bike for 15 years now in the Bonneville, and like Ducati's Scrambler, the various Bonnie's are Triumphs best sellers, whilst being far from their best bikes. Heavier and slower than the Scrambler, I wouldn't want to sell mine, but ride the Scrambler and it definitely feels like the new, young kid on the block.

BMW made a cock up with the Nine-T in my opinion, too complicated, too confused and too expensive. It'll be interesting to see if they can regain some ground with the new range of 'basic' bikes that's mooted to be coming for 2016.

Meanwhile, Ducati seem to have re-found the formula that made the original Monster such a hit, and long may it continue.
Agree - wholeheartedly - with the exception of the "love" for the modern Bonnies.

I simply don't like those bikes at all. Heavy, ponderous, and I simply detest that motor. The "real" bonnies (like my '67 TR6) were WAY better (except for the "leaking oil all over the garage floor" part) :joyous:
 
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I simply don't like those bikes at all. Heavy, ponderous, and I simply detest that motor. The "real" bonnies (like my '67 TR6) were WAY better (except for the "leaking oil all over the garage floor" part) :joyous:
I love the looks of the original Triumph's, but was never fool enough to buy one. I bught an 850 Commando Roadster instead, which in hindsight was probably as crap as an original Triumph Bonneville. :joyous: I then moved onto Honda 4's and then to Ducati's, BMW's and Laverda's, etc and never looked back.

Like the Scrambler, the original Bonnie only really shares the name, there's not much else in common. I didn't think I'd like the Bonneville due to it's weight and lack of power, but having spent a fair on sorting the bike and supspension how I want it, I find it very endearing and do enjoy every ride on it, and is the one bike I own that I do ride all year round regardless.
 
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