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Just got mine today! First one in Knoxville, TN, and I am loving it!
Surprised that I have not found a thread on canister removal. It is an ugly wart that is needed only in California (correct me if I am wrong).....so, has anybody done this? It looks like it would be easy, but I would like some directions just to be sure.
 

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Just got mine today! First one in Knoxville, TN, and I am loving it!
Surprised that I have not found a thread on canister removal. It is an ugly wart that is needed only in California (correct me if I am wrong).....so, has anybody done this? It looks like it would be easy, but I would like some directions just to be sure.
Well, I guess I will answer my own question. I have removed the ugly thing with these directions:
Ducati Evaporative Emissions Canister and System - webBikeWorld
 

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Did you look at the link above to Web bike World? Just follow his directions especially his "Update"
 

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Since I'm in California I'm stuck with that eye sore. I mentioned it when I looked at the bike a bit back to the Ducati rep and he just kind of shrugged. I mentioned that while I know there were no fairings to hide it behind they could of done something to attempt to cover it.
 

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Since I'm in California I'm stuck with that eye sore. I mentioned it when I looked at the bike a bit back to the Ducati rep and he just kind of shrugged. I mentioned that while I know there were no fairings to hide it behind they could of done something to attempt to cover it.
Be careful what you wish for, when they 'hid' the evap filter on the Diavel, Ducati put a -1-2 litre cut-out in the fuel tank and ruined the range for the USA bikes.
 

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I guess its better then that since the tank is fairly small to begin with. I may decide to make a stainless steel cover for it and then maybe slap a Scrambler forum sticker on it :)
 

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Do the intakes on the bikes sold without an evap canister have the hole for the fitting? If so, how is it plugged on those bikes? How is the fuel overflow line routed on these bikes without an evap canister.

FWIW, I plan to remove all of it (the canister, bracket, hoses, fittings), plug the intake holes and keep the original bits safely in a box.

The canister had been removed from my 748S when I got it, but whoever did this left all of the hoses and intake fittings (similar to what is described in the webBikeWorld "update"). However, I don't like extra, unused parts on my vehicles*, so I removed those hoses and fittings and plugged the holes with hex key bolts cut to length.

* When I removed the A/C from my Mazda 323GTX, I researched the details of the non-A/C cars and removed and replaced parts (even wiring looms, switch panels and ventilation ducting) so it appeared that the car never had A/C.
 

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I removed mine last night. It was pretty easy and took about 30 minutes. It's similar to a Monster, except we only have one throttle body, so there is 1 less hose, and one less hole to plug. The pain in the butt part is getting at the hose barb fitting on the throttle body, because it's up inside pretty far. I was able to get at it with a 10mm socket attached to universal joint, attached to an extension.

You will need an M6x8 1.0 pitch threaded bolt to plug the hole. I used an allen head style.

I have updated this post with pictures. I loosely followed this: Removing the Evaporative Emissions Canister

1. Remove the plastic faring around the oil cooler to get at the hose barb on the throttle body. There are 3 metric allen head screws holding it in place.
2. Remove the small plastic triangular piece that's held on by one 3 mm allen screw (the piece in the triangle of the trellis frame).

This is a picture of the front screw on the oil cooler faring that you need to remove. It's 3mm allen.



This is a picture of the the other two 3 mm allen screws on the front faring, and the 2.5 mm allen screw holding on the triangular piece.



3. Disconnect the hoses from the top of the evap canister (the bottom hose is an overflow and not connected to anything).
4. Remove the evap canister and bracket, smile at how much better it already looks.

The arrow in this picture points to the tabs holding the evap canister, just push on them to remove it. The circles are the two 3 mm allen head screws to remove the bracket.



5. One of the hoses goes up to the gas tank, and the other goes to the throttle body. Follow the hose to the throttle body. This is where you curse when you see where it is.
6. I was able to release the hose clamp with a needle nose pliers through the hole where I removed the triangular piece of plastic. Do that, and then you can pull the hose off the barb on the throttle body.
7. Using a 10mm socket attached to universal joint attached to an extension, finagle your way in through the hole where the faring was that surrounds the oil cooler, and get the socket over the hose barb. Remove it, and keep the copper washer.
8. Screw the M6x8 back into the same spot on the throttle body, and use the copper washer that was on the hose barb you just took off.

Here is the final M6 in place, looking through the triangular piece of plastic you removed in step 2:



And here is the final M6 in place, looking threw the oil cooler lines, this is the easiest angle to get at the nipple from, and to screw in the replacement M6.



9. Route the remaining breather hose from the tank down along with the other hoses in the area.

This is a picture of how I routed my fuel line. I've highlighted it in red.



10. Reward yourself with a beer.
 

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Just did my bike.

Getting the oil cooler fairing off was a little tricky because the fitting that attaches the upper bolt on the side to the frame was turning (instead of the bolt turning) when I tried to loosen the bolt. I undid the other two bolts (4mm hex "Allen" key), then was able to pull the fairing up enough to get a wrench (12mm) behind it and onto the fitting to hold it while I loosened and removed the bolt.

Getting the fitting off of the intake took some thought. The barb on the end of the fitting was too long to fit a normal 10mm socket over and there wasn't room to get my deep socket on. I ended up breaking it loose with a wrench most from the side then I could get my fingers in to turn it.

One thing that I think should be mentioned is what to do with fuel tank overflow line. It is attached to a spark plug lead by a rubber strap. I moved the strap further up the spark plug lead so I could more easily route the fuel overflow line into the bundle of hoses near where the evap canister bracket attaches to the engine.
 

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Big thanks to you two for providing the little details, pictures would be most welcome, too. Thanks again!

Sarah
 

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I posted some photos on Facebook and shared them with the Scrambler Owners Group there.

I was going to add arrows and circles and post them here, but someone else has already done that.
 

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Ahhhhh THAT is what that ugly ass thing is. Just picked my bike up yesterday and really didn't have anytime to look at it till today.

Forgive me... first street legal bike.. yeah, that thing is going bye bye.

Thanks a bunch for the pictures and instructions!!!
 

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Based on your member name, you are probably not in California, but, for those people in California, be careful about removing the evap canister there. The state has been known to assess large fines for making non-compliant alterations to the emissions system there.
 
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