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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Never had this problem before but on the Scrambler at my favorite roundabout it runs really wide, I go in at the same point as all my other bikes, steady throttle, nice lean angle and speed but it runs Wide! Would increasing the preload on the rear Help? I've got the maxton conversion front and rear, I've never touched it or ever set up suspension before.
Thanks for any advice in advance.
 

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Are you letting up on the throttle at any point in the turn or braking at all? If you slow down, the bike will straighten up and you will end up going wide. It's also possible you just need a tighter angle. Roundabouts can be tricky if you come in too hot and are forced to decelerate.

Very unlikely it has anything to do with the bike mechanically speaking. Mount a gopro or phone to your helmet or jacket and take some video to review.

What are the other bikes you are comparing it to? You might just need to lose the comparison and take a fresh approach.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are you letting up on the throttle at any point in the turn or braking at all? If you slow down, the bike will straighten up and you will end up going wide. It's also possible you just need a tighter angle. Roundabouts can be tricky if you come in too hot and are forced to decelerate.

Very unlikely it has anything to do with the bike mechanically speaking. Mount a gopro or phone to your helmet or jacket and take some video to review.

What are the other bikes you are comparing it to? You might just need to lose the comparison and take a fresh approach.
Hi,
Thanks for the reply,
Defo not braking but maybe slowing slightly, good idea I'll stick my gopro on (if I can find it from my mountain biking days ).
The other bikes were gsxr 600/750, monster s2r 1000, zxr636, bandit, cbr400 all would allow me to go round and round the same roundabout with no issues and all with minimal chicken strips.
These were a few years ago and Im now heading towards 50 with arthritis in both hips which won't help but shouldn't send it wide.
It could be that it's more up right and I need to adjust my way of riding plus I do more distance with the wife on the back which has altered the way I ride as keeping to the speed limit and not moving around on the bike. (I'm not wanting to go low with pillion).
Cheers
 

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I had the same on my Desert Sled on my first ride. I prefer my bikes to steer neutral, leaning towards a light oversteer, not understeer.

I added about 15mm of preload on the shock collar. Part of this just to offset my weight, the average Italian testrider weighs closer to 150lbs, while I am around 210-220lbs. But also the quicken up the steering.

These 15mm did it for me. It's perfect now. It just goes where I'm looking, and doesn't need any extra steering input.

And to be honest, I think part of this is to blame to the wide rear tire (especially on the "regular" Scrambler), 180/55 is kind of wide and flat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I had the same on my Desert Sled on my first ride. I prefer my bikes to steer neutral, leaning towards a light oversteer, not understeer.

I added about 15mm of preload on the shock collar. Part of this just to offset my weight, the average Italian testrider weighs closer to 150lbs, while I am around 210-220lbs. But also the quicken up the steering.

These 15mm did it for me. It's perfect now. It just goes where I'm looking, and doesn't need any extra steering input.

And to be honest, I think part of this is to blame to the wide rear tire (especially on the "regular" Scrambler), 180/55 is kind of wide and flat.
Thanks for that, I'll give it a go on my next outing, see if I can go round the roundabout without been forced to exit early.
 

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I agree with the above - coming off the throttle or braking stands the bike up and it drifts wide. Just keep on the throttle and see what happens - you don't need to go mad.
 

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Or trailbrake going in. Settles the bike on the suspension. Not too much or you'll lowside but don't they have ABS anyway? Dunno...it's never kicked in for me. Or go hard on the throttle as suggested by faster riders than me but I am a bit of a sook.
 

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Too wide on exit means not enough compression damping on the rear. Not much you can do about with the OEM shock though.
Some here is some good reading about suspension set up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Too wide on exit means not enough compression damping on the rear. Not much you can do about with the OEM shock though.
Some here is some good reading about suspension set up.
Excuse my lack of knowledge but does that mean the rear is squatting down too much?, so with increasing the preload help? The rear shock is a Maxton and fronts have the Maxton inners.
 

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Yes, the rear is sqatting too much. Increase the compression damping if it is available on your shock. Increasing the preload may help but probably at the expense of some other characteristic. Read the article I posted, it's a lot more knowledgeable than me.
 
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Who decelerates on exits? :stupid:

I think I understand the OP: the moment you're past the apex, and you start to exit the turn, the bike stands up quicker and rolls wider than desired. Assuming the road is flat and well maintained, I blame this more on geometry and tire sizing and shape, than on damping settings.

Anyway, aren't the MT60 as fitted OEM, slightly flatter than the Angel GT's? I would assume the Angel GT's to roll slightly easier into, and out of a turn...

Anyway, testing a little preload is a free test.
 

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Who decelerates on exits? :stupid:
Nobody said "decelerating on exit". The angle of your turn is determined when you enter it. There isn't much you can do in the turn to shorten the angle, but any amount of deceleration, at any point, will widen the angle some. That becomes especially noticeable (and sometimes scary) when you were set up to exit on the outside in the first place.

No doubt, the preload test is free and can't hurt.
 

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The angle of your turn is determined when you enter it. There isn't much you can do in the turn to shorten the angle
I don't want to be the wiseguy, but this is simply not true. A little countersteer is all you need to tighten a turn.

Sounds to me like the OP doesn't want to countersteer to get the bike where he aims it.

Let's await his reply ;)
 

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I don't want to be the wiseguy, but this is simply not true. A little countersteer is all you need to tighten a turn.

Sounds to me like the OP doesn't want to countersteer to get the bike where he aims it.

Let's await his reply ;)
Like I said, there isn't much you can do, but sure you can countersteer a bit in a turn assuming your speed is low/your lean isn't too tight.
 

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I think you guys completely misunderstand the physics involved. When you accelerate the front forks extend and the rear end squats. If the rear squats too much while exiting a corner the head angle increases, slowing the steering and the bike runs wide.
Try reading this article I posted above : Motorcycle Suspension Set-up
 
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