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Discussion Starter #1
I just got my Scrambler, chosen mainly for its light weight as I am a Small Person. In situations where I need to move the bike with my feet ("duck walk") I am hampered by the pegs. My short legs only touch the ground (tippy toe) if they are behind the pegs. This gives me very little room to maneuver and it doesn't feel too safe.

Here is my question and I would be very grateful for words of wisdom from all you experienced Scrambler folks. If I remove the springs from the front pegs, would they "click" up and down like the passenger pegs, or would they flop around and potentially not be there when I need them?

Don't judge me guys, you should see my shins... Looks like I have been playing soccer all year without guards!

While we are at it any other advice for the a Short Rider would be welcome (so far I have taken all the pre load out of the shocks and ordered a reduced reach seat which is not here yet). I am sure there is more... All advice welcome.
 

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Removing the springs won't let the pegs click up and down like the passenger pegs, they'll just , well, err, flop around like you said.
If you really, really wanted them to operate like the passenger pegs it would be possible to modify the footpeg brackets to do it.
It would take a bit of countersinking to fit a ball bearing that would align with the little half hole in the footpegs, (I think the riders pegs already have them. A little bit of mucking around but it's possible. Once the ball bearing is fitted to the bracket it would have to be crimped over to retain the ball.
Then, the two tangs of the footpeg brackets would have to be squeezed closer together to apply the correct pressure to the peg.
Your plan would be to copy the operation of the passenger footpegs.

The other thing you could try if the new seat doesn't do the trick is to take your original seat to an upholsterer or auto trimmer and ask if they can reduce the height of it.
Density of the new filling would be something you'd have to work out according to how much comfort you are willing to sacrifice.

Hope you have a win, it makes all the difference to a ride when you feel comfortable with positioning.

(edit0 I just checked and the rider pegs do have the little indent holes same as the passenger pegs.
 

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My short legs only touch the ground (tippy toe) if they are behind the pegs. This gives me very little room to maneuver and it doesn't feel too safe.
Make your maneuvers off the bike.
Grab the handlebar and keep your body against fuel tank while moving the bike.

There is no shame in making maneuvers off the bike.
I'm below average for a male and do it all the time. Its safe and it works.
 

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Just curious, how tall are you? My wife is 4' 11" and would be pretty unsafe on my Scrambler with the comfort seat I have installed but that seat is an inch or so higher than the stock Icon seat. You might want to consider the lowered seat or something similar: Amazon.com: Ducati Scrambler Lowered Seat 96880171A: Automotive


Onto your question, I wouldn't take the springs out. You might find yourself sorry when it's time to put your feet on them and they are up. I'm relatively tall and keep my feet behind the pegs at lights too...if someone bumps me, it's just safer but if you are on your toes you probably don't have much travel with your feet.

Depending on how short you are, it might be worth it to relocate the pegs or something but that can be a huge pain in the ass. Again, I'd look at a shorter seat. A custom shop might be able to tell you just how low they can modify the seat within reason. That would be more $$$ than the ~$200 lower seat from Ducati, but it would probably be your best bet, especially since safety and your shins are concerned. Would really suck finding yourself stopped at an uphill light.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just curious, how tall are you? My wife is 4' 11" and would be pretty unsafe on my Scrambler with the comfort seat I have installed but that seat is an inch or so higher than the stock Icon seat. You might want to consider the lowered seat or something similar: Amazon.com: Ducati Scrambler Lowered Seat 96880171A: Automotive


Onto your question, I wouldn't take the springs out. You might find yourself sorry when it's time to put your feet on them and they are up. I'm relatively tall and keep my feet behind the pegs at lights too...if someone bumps me, it's just safer but if you are on your toes you probably don't have much travel with your feet.

Depending on how short you are, it might be worth it to relocate the pegs or something but that can be a huge pain in the ass. Again, I'd look at a shorter seat. A custom shop might be able to tell you just how low they can modify the seat within reason. That would be more $$$ than the ~$200 lower seat from Ducati, but it would probably be your best bet, especially since safety and your shins are concerned. Would really suck finding yourself stopped at an uphill light.
Just curious, how tall are you? My wife is 4' 11" and would be pretty unsafe on my Scrambler with the comfort seat I have installed but that seat is an inch or so higher than the stock Icon seat. You might want to consider the lowered seat or something similar: Amazon.com: Ducati Scrambler Lowered Seat 96880171A: Automotive


Onto your question, I wouldn't take the springs out. You might find yourself sorry when it's time to put your feet on them and they are up. I'm relatively tall and keep my feet behind the pegs at lights too...if someone bumps me, it's just safer but if you are on your toes you probably don't have much travel with your feet.

Depending on how short you are, it might be worth it to relocate the pegs or something but that can be a huge pain in the ass. Again, I'd look at a shorter seat. A custom shop might be able to tell you just how low they can modify the seat within reason. That would be more $$$ than the ~$200 lower seat from Ducati, but it would probably be your best bet, especially since safety and your shins are concerned. Would really suck finding yourself stopped at an uphill light.

5 ft... So just a little taller than your wife. If the bike was any heavier, I would be out of luck. I can't consider panniers because I have no wiggle room on weight. Placing all my hopes on the reduced reach seat. And yes it DOES suck on even a slight incline and I have the bruises to prove it. Thank you for your reply.
 

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Placing all my hopes on the reduced reach seat.
You only need one foot in the ground when stopped! :)

All other kind of maneuvers can be done off the bike.

A reduced seat is the best option for sure. (Ducati has optional lower seat in catalog).
It can compromise some confort.... or not! Scrambler oem seat is not a good example of confort!

Also, you can get some extra milimiters by raising the front fork jars.
Something like this:



(its not a scrambler, but works as example)

Its a very common modification for this situation.
 

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Is there any real harm in trying the pegs without springs? Overall, might make her situation less precarious that it currently is. I'd be willing to take risks with the factory seat too, since I think it thoroughly sucked. I'd cut out the toolbox as others have done, shave down the factory foam to a very thin base, and add a thin layer or two of good quality supportive foam. Or skip fiddling with the factory foam and shave the foam in a Seat Concepts kit, it's good stuff and works down easily with a belt sander. Hang in there ShortGirl, you can make this work.

Sarah
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You only need one foot in the ground when stopped! :)

All other kind of maneuvers can be done off the bike.

A reduced seat is the best option for sure. (Ducati has optional lower seat in catalog).
It can compromise some confort.... or not! Scrambler oem seat is not a good example of confort!

Also, you can get some extra milimiters by raising the front fork jars.
Something like this:



(its not a scrambler, but works as example)

Its a very common modification for this situation.
Does it compromise the handling at all?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
image.jpeg
I would like to thank everyone for all the advice. I have been "practicing" moving the bike around "off the bike" and am finding that very helpful in tight spots. I still don't have my lower seat and will you all know what happens when I get it.

Meanwhile. For general moving around that has to be done on the bike (like coming to a stop at a light or stop sign) I have found a very good solution which was inexpensive... I bought a pair of Nike shin guards. While I still tippy toe, my confidence is up 100% now I know at least putting a foot down won't result in a painful bump!

Thank you all, you are a great group and I look forward to continued participation on the forum.
 

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A lot of great responses have come up already, so I'll just add a few more things to mention.
I'm 5'3", so I understand the struggles.

Scoot up towards the tank. This should give you a bit more leverage and allow you to place your foot in front/side of the foot peg instead of behind it.

When placing your foot down, don't be afraid to scoot your but over the side as well. This will allow you more length to get a foot down. My wife who's 5'2" tends to also angle the bike a bit for even more length, but not to the point where the bike is falling over. Unfortunately for us, it's more of a balance game.

There's an exercise you can practice that should inspire confidence for the one-footed way. You can practice this exercise while it's on its stand until you're ready to try it without it. But it's basically doing "hot potato", jumping from one leg to the other, balancing the bike between you. This is like practicing E-stops... it's for those moments when a gust of wind or something takes your balance off a bit and you need to switch to the other leg quickly.

Another tip... pay attention to any roads that have slopes when you're about to stop. It's best to plant the foot on the higher ground. I had to learn that one the hard way. I almost dropped the bike :grin:
 

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Is there any real harm in trying the pegs without springs?
No real harm.
But without springs, pegs become more loose.
And it easily move up if while riding at a fast pace you lean forward.

Does it compromise the handling at all?
Never tried on scrambler as never felt the need to.
But already made this modifications on other motorcycles.
Also, is a very common modification on sportbikes to improve entrance in sharp corners.
 

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You might also contact Martin at M-Powered in Florida. He is a suspension specialist that has a set up for the Scrambler utilizing the K-Tech Bullit shock to lower seat height and improve ride. 727-744-1525
 

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I'm 5'3" and can't flat foot anything. With my Scrambler I had some foam taken out of the seat and a gel pad inserted to make it lower and for more comfort (also much cheaper than the lowered seat, which I didn't find very comfortable). I've had the rear shock replaced with a Nitron, which was also shortened. I wear stacked boots (Daytona Ladystar) which give you an extra inch or so, they feel a bit thick initially but you do get used to them. Now can almost flat foot!

I would be very wary of adjusting the fork height if you don't know what you are doing as it will affect the handling.
 

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I would be very wary of adjusting the fork height if you don't know what you are doing as it will affect the handling.
Yes, for sure, but shortening the rear shock also affects the handling. In fact, all actions that change the position of the wheels from the frame will affect the handling. Shortening the shock or reducing the fork height will modify the distance between both contact points of the wheels and will change the steering angle. This may give a more unstable bike and should be, as you say, considered seriously before acting.
 

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Yes, for sure, but shortening the rear shock also affects the handling. In fact, all actions that change the position of the wheels from the frame will affect the handling. Shortening the shock or reducing the fork height will modify the distance between both contact points of the wheels and will change the steering angle. This may give a more unstable bike and should be, as you say, considered seriously before acting.
Yes I've had to make adjustments to the forks to compensate for the rear, but VERY minor - it was interesting to see just how little was needed to make quite a big difference (talking mms).
 

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It's also important to know that you don't need to flat-foot a bike. I've ridden bikes taller than the scrambler. As long as you can get a toe or the balls of your feet down (on one foot), it's manageable! Unless you want to do what the video mentioned early demonstrates :blob7:
 

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5 ft... So just a little taller than your wife. If the bike was any heavier, I would be out of luck. I can't consider panniers because I have no wiggle room on weight. Placing all my hopes on the reduced reach seat. And yes it DOES suck on even a slight incline and I have the bruises to prove it. Thank you for your reply.
Hi ShortGirl! I'm in exactly same boat as you. I'm also 5' tall. I have the lower seat installed on my bike plus the pre-load adjusted so that it's as low as possible. Right now, I'm not tip toeing the bike, but I'm on the balls of my feet.

I agree with one of the earlier posters about learning to move the bike around without having to be on it. I've been doing that by either using only my left leg and treating the bike as my really heavy right leg. Otherwise, I get off the bike and lean some of its weight on my hip while moving it where I need to. Granted, it's a real workout for me until I totally get used to it. I'm just really glad that the bike is light.

When I get to stops, including inclined stops, I've learned to put my left leg down, lean some of the weight to the left side, and then keeping some of my right foot on the brake. It helps. I think it all comes down to the confidence on being on the bike. I've already had the misfortune of dropping my bike once, and that experience taught me that the bike is light enough for me to pick back up. I'd also advise with trying to avoid stopping at inclines as much as possible. It sucks to get stuck there and loose any footing.

Also, I've been considering what my mechanic suggested about adjusting the height of your front forks, it's possible to get that front lowered a bit and that may give you 3/4". I want to talk to my mechanic about that.

It's also helped for me to be wearing heeled boots for riding. I use the Dr. Martens Josefa boot.

Hope that helps! Glad that there's another shorty rider around here!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hi ShortGirl! I'm in exactly same boat as you. I'm also 5' tall. I have the lower seat installed on my bike plus the pre-load adjusted so that it's as low as possible. Right now, I'm not tip toeing the bike, but I'm on the balls of my feet.

I agree with one of the earlier posters about learning to move the bike around without having to be on it. I've been doing that by either using only my left leg and treating the bike as my really heavy right leg. Otherwise, I get off the bike and lean some of its weight on my hip while moving it where I need to. Granted, it's a real workout for me until I totally get used to it. I'm just really glad that the bike is light.

When I get to stops, including inclined stops, I've learned to put my left leg down, lean some of the weight to the left side, and then keeping some of my right foot on the brake. It helps. I think it all comes down to the confidence on being on the bike. I've already had the misfortune of dropping my bike once, and that experience taught me that the bike is light enough for me to pick back up. I'd also advise with trying to avoid stopping at inclines as much as possible. It sucks to get stuck there and loose any footing.

Also, I've been considering what my mechanic suggested about adjusting the height of your front forks, it's possible to get that front lowered a bit and that may give you 3/4". I want to talk to my mechanic about that.

It's also helped for me to be wearing heeled boots for riding. I use the Dr. Martens Josefa boot.

Hope that helps! Glad that there's another shorty rider around here!
 
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