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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that the Scrambler is a dual purpose machine for some. However, not paying attention to keeping the fork legs clean and undamaged will end up costing a lot of money. The lower fork legs retail for about $600 each. Rocks, Sand and dirt can scratch and pit the slider area causing the seals to tear and leak. Even after they are sanded down the pitting may always seep and leak. This is common on dirt bikes that are not taken care of but the Scrambler is pricey to repair.
Here are a few before and after pics of a set of forks that came into the shop. I spent over a hour fine sanding the forks to being usable.
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Resuilt of/ ducati using the cheapest fork tubes they could find or do we need to cover up.?My classic comes with lower protectors .Got to put ythe Andreani kit on should i put of those Fork booties as well .Mine is to be setup as desert sled so going to be lotsa dirt
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They are cheap internal quality but that isn't the factor. It's cleaning and inspecting the forks after riding. The boots and sleeves can trap in dirt. So at first they protect and then once soiled they work against your forks. Once a rock knicks the slider the metal is edged out and that rips the seals causing a leak. They must be fine sanded with 1000 grit paper very softly and gently.
 

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Ok so what about fork gaiters as per my DR 650 like real dirt bike might be a good look ;-).Yeh had a look not sure how that would go ....Actually might try it dont like can always take off ;-)Call it preventative maintenance ;-)
 

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Not good! I have an old inner tube wrapped around my rear shock for this reason. It's in just the right place to catch mud and grit!
I might do something up front?
 

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I've never seen fork gaiters on USD forks, but early BSA Bantams had them for a time. My Classic has slider protectors too, but long black gaiters could fit behind them, I suspect, and would not look too far out of place. Something else on which to ponder.
 

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Thanks for the head's up and fair warning, Ken. How about some Shock Sox:

6" U STREET SHOCK SOX

Our upside down forks put the tube right in harms way, easy to see how they'll get dinged.

Sarah
 

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I've never seen fork gaiters on USD forks, but early BSA Bantams had them for a time. My Classic has slider protectors too, but long black gaiters could fit behind them, I suspect, and would not look too far out of place. Something else on which to ponder.
They could be fitted but you'd need to strip the forks to fit them. Not too big a job if you are changing the oil at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If your riding on paved roads this type of problem is not really a issue. However, Any type of gravel or mud then it's a big problem. Shock socks will help to cut down the chances of a rock hit or excessive dirt. The down side of the Shock sock is that once they are soiled then they can work against your forks. They can hold grit and sand between the sock and the slider. If you run a Shock sock then it needs to be cleaned often.
 

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Thanks, Ken. Yep, here's a snip from the Sox website:

"The beauty of Shock Sox is that they are removable for easy cleaning and great fork seal protection. Don’t be lazy…leaving the Shock Sox on during cleaning will trap moisture and grit, potentially causing fork seal leakage!"

Sarah
 

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Hello
"The beauty of Shock Sox is that they are removable for easy cleaning and great fork seal protection. Don’t be lazy…leaving the Shock Sox on during cleaning will trap moisture and grit, potentially causing fork seal leakage!"
Interesting... But what about driving in wet conditions ? Does it mean that you must then remove the bike sox and dry them aside the pilot sockets and boots ? :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hello

Interesting... But what about driving in wet conditions ? Does it mean that you must then remove the bike sox and dry them aside the pilot sockets and boots ? :D
They hold up pretty well with use. I've found that they should be replaced every year. They just need to be looked at once in a while. If it's dusty, sandy or gross then clean it or replace it.
 

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They look like they are worthwhile having, with no need to strip the forks to fit them, and easily detached for cleaning. They are available on eBay over here. I intend checking with R & G Racing to see if they do any, as I'm happy with the Shock Tubes on the Classic and DS. If not, the Shock Sox will be my next purchase.
 

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They look like they are worthwhile having, with no need to strip the forks to fit them, and easily detached for cleaning. They are available on eBay over here. I intend checking with R & G Racing to see if they do any, as I'm happy with the Shock Tubes on the Classic and DS. If not, the Shock Sox will be my next purchase.
Auriga can you post the link in Ebay? thanks

so are they worthwhile having only for dirt trips? or even for pavement?

thanks
 

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Well worth having, in my opinion. Changing fork seals strains my piddly skills. And a leaking seal is absolutely miserable on a long trip, the fork oil blows back at speed and covers your boot and pant leg.

Sarah
 

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MMM i think a good option is the urban enduro fork protectors,Can see how the sox might not help especially with red dust.Got to put andreani kit in anyway so will try and get some for then .Thats all dirt bikes have
 

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Well, I'm an old woman so I reckon I'll go ahead and nag. That long trip I mentioned in my post above was on a WR250R, with upside down forks and Urban Enduro type fork protectors. We headed across Labrador (gravel, gravel, gravel) and in no time I had a nick in my fork tube and commenced to enjoy a drowned boot and pant leg. It was a long, oily ride back to Kentucky, as you might imagine. Thank you one more time Ken, this thread has been an excellent reminder for me.

Sarah
 

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Urban ones are bit different tho and cover nearly all exposed parts ,but point taken .Good little bikes those WR 250 even as an adv bike ,mates got one .
 
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