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Hello

Maybe this subject has been discussed in another thread, if so you can delete it...

If not, let's see how you can easily and cheaply modify your Scrambler to remove quite all throttle jerking and get a good feeling from the front wheel.

Our preferred bike handlebar is mounted on the upper tee via a vibration damping system. This system is a little too soft and the effect of this softness is that you react on the throttle specially on bumpy roads. We call this throttle jerking and many of you are worrying about this.

How do we proceed ?

Just unscrew the screw under the upper tee, that holds the bolt coming from the handlebar support. There's one on each side of the tee. Remove also the washer. Don't remove anything else.
Before mounting back the original washer and screw, put on the bolt 2 washers (on each side) with following dimensions : external diameter 33 mm, internal diameter 19 mm, thickness 3 mm.
Put back the original washer and the screw and tighten the bolt. You'll see that the handlebar mount will come in contact with the upper tee. Tighten the bolt as much as possible.

Now, the vibration damping is unactivated. Go and ride and enjoy a different bike : no more throttle jerking, more precision and more feeling coming from the front wheel, no vibrations in the handlebar !
 

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Thanks for sharing Vince!
While sourcing the proper washer for the job, can I confirm tool size required to unscrew the nut below the tee?
thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)

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Thanks for posting, sounds like something I would like to try but being a bit clueless what is this "tee" you are talking about?
 

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What do I call the tee ? Both parts, one upper, one lower that hold the fork legs and the direction pivot, the handlebar being fixed on the upper tee. Maybe "bracket" would be better ?
It's typically called the triple tree.
 

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What do I call the tee ? Both parts, one upper, one lower that hold the fork legs and the direction pivot, the handlebar being fixed on the upper tee. Maybe "bracket" would be better ?
Thanks understood. Any info where correct spacers can be found either in UK or USA?
 

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What do I call the tee ? Both parts, one upper, one lower that hold the fork legs and the direction pivot, the handlebar being fixed on the upper tee. Maybe "bracket" would be better ?
It’s a ‘yoke’ unless you're American then for some obscure reason it becomes a triple tree ??
 

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Hello

Maybe this subject has been discussed in another thread, if so you can delete it...

If not, let's see how you can easily and cheaply modify your Scrambler to remove quite all throttle jerking and get a good feeling from the front wheel.

Our preferred bike handlebar is mounted on the upper tee via a vibration damping system. This system is a little too soft and the effect of this softness is that you react on the throttle specially on bumpy roads. We call this throttle jerking and many of you are worrying about this.

How do we proceed ?

Just unscrew the screw under the upper tee, that holds the bolt coming from the handlebar support. There's one on each side of the tee. Remove also the washer. Don't remove anything else.
Before mounting back the original washer and screw, put on the bolt 2 washers (on each side) with following dimensions : external diameter 33 mm, internal diameter 19 mm, thickness 3 mm.
Put back the original washer and the screw and tighten the bolt. You'll see that the handlebar mount will come in contact with the upper tee. Tighten the bolt as much as possible.

Now, the vibration damping is unactivated. Go and ride and enjoy a different bike : no more throttle jerking, more precision and more feeling coming from the front wheel, no vibrations in the handlebar !
That was helpful! =]
 

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Apart from that, remove your throttle tube, thoroughly clean the inside, and the bars, and apply ample powdered grahite before you put it back.

This eliminates stiction on the tube which greatly improves throttle response.
 

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Never in my life until very recently has steering yokes been called 'triple trees in the UK. Along with fenders and hoods. A result of watching too much American TV/youtube etc.
You need to get out a bit more. I’ve been reading Back Street Hero’s, a very British bike customising magazine for about 20 years and they’ve always been called triple trees. But really, what does it matter, as long as we all know what we’re talking about.
 

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That said, I grew up in Europe and read mostly British magazines. Yoke is the common word in the UK. The first time I heard about triple trees was on Advrider....
 

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True Jakethedog, it matters not a jot really, but.
It certainly looks Americanised to me, I've been reading it for a long time too especially the last couple of years when they went with more Streetfighter and Bobber builds. I can also remember when buying it you had to put it inside a porn mag to save embarrassment at the checkout till.

Back Street Heroes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Back Street Heroes (est. 1983) is a monthly UK custom bike magazine that helped to popularize a "new breed" of custom motorcycle, distinct from previous choppers because they combined rat bike-influenced utilitarian and minimalistdesign with greater use of high tech gadgetry, but catering to an upscale buyer in the Robb Report demographic.[3]

Back Street Heroes "celebrates the sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll, black leather, long hair and open exhausts aspect of motorcycling,"[4] targeting, like its US counterpart Easyriders, the "hardcore" niche.[5] It is one of a handful of biker magazines that included fiction until 2016.[6] The magazine tied together geographically isolated enthusiasts of biker culture by keeping them up to date on custom bike mechanical techniques and styles, and motorcycle rallies, as well related culture, such as biker music and their music.[7] All this earned the magazine credibility with the mainstream press on the subject of outlaw motorcycle clubs.[8][9]

Ian 'Maz' Harris, PhD, founder of the Bulldog Bash rally and spokesman for the Hells Angels, was a regular contributor.[10][11] Another Hells Angel, Brian 'Moke' Thompson, was also featured in the magazine.[12] L. J. K. Setrightcontributed technical articles, and Paul Sample's Ogri cartoon moved to Back Street Heroes in 2009 for a short while (ceased in 2012), after 35 years at Bike.[13]
 
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