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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All
I have seen a Lambda o2 sensor eliminator kit offered on ebay !
Not being mechanically minded !! Can anyone tell me If I should get a set ?
and if so whats the benefit ?

Thanks in advance

Happy Christmas
Mrd
 

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iv tried one, it does what it says it will do,that is richening up the low range.no point doing it if your bike runs ok.
 

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But on the Scrambler, doesn't the ecu read the lamda sensor at higher rpm to determine the mixture?
I can only assume the ECU reads the sensors at all revs. I think that the ecu has a problem managing fuel at low revs but settles in better the higher you go. I recently took off my lamda sensors using the kit on ebay and fitted a zard "race" pipe The immediate effect was smoother running at low revs. I have also just had the ECU stock map cleared and remapped to manage these changes (Rexxer unit done by Ducati Manchester). All I know is that the remap best fits the type of exhaust and knows the lamdas are disabled. The bike runs much better. By that I mean no jerky throttle responses at low speeds/revs and feels like there is a pronounced increase in power across rev band.

I have not checked fuel consumption but since I last filled I have done 115 miles and not hit reserve yet.
 

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I read a post somewhere on here from, I think, and exhaust company? I'm thinking it said it was a closed loop system at low revs, and didn't read the O2 sensor, but higher up it became open loop and read the sensor, adjusting the mixture to suit?

If someone could find it and copy it, it'd be useful!
 

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The lambda or O2 sensor as the name would suggest monitors the concentration of O2 molecules in the exhaust stream and feeds this information back (closed loop) to the ECU in the form of a varying DC voltage converted to 1s and 0s by an A/D converter. Unburned O2 in the exhaust indicates a lean condition and the ECU richens the fuel flow accordingly to achieve the optimum air/fuel ratio (about 14.7 lb. air to 1 lb. fuel for gasoline engines). The device is slow to react to changes in O2 levels, therefore the ECU uses the lambda input only at relatively steady RPM and throttle openings and disregards (open loop) when the throttle/RPMs change suddenly. The lambda probe is a very ingenious and effective device for maximizing fuel economy and minimizing emissions. As I recall ECUs compensate for loss of the lambda input by going to a slightly rich mixture to avoid any possibility of engine damage. I think for the layman not much would be accomplished by disabling the system other than to shorten the bikes range, pollute the environment, foul the plugs, cylinders and exhaust.
 

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There's the term 'PE' for wide open throttle, where the ECU may not use closed loop for fueling, and falls back to VE tables. Bypassing or removing the O2 sensors should only be needed when MAF calibration or full ECU tuning is not accurate enough, as closed loop operation provides the most accurate fueling strategy. ECU with bandwidth O2 tuning should be preferred every time, unless there are specific fueling problems or some electronics' issues that may not be solved that way.

For nowadays engines, 'Fuelers' and O2 removal devices are just a workaround for when ECU tuning is not possible or still buggy.


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