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Took my bike in yesterday for the 600 mile service and the dealer didn’t have any Shell oil and used Motul 7100 15W 50 oil. I must say I like this oil a lot. I’ve logged over 125 miles after the oil change and the bike just feels a lot smoother.

Anyone else here use Motul?
 

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I always found that my last Suzuki had smoother gear changes when I put Motul oil (which was recommended by Suzuki) in. They may use a slightly different friction modifier in their oil that other brands do.
 

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I haven't used it and probably wouldn't be able to discern any difference between Motul 7100 and any other oil, but it is a top rated oil by this review: Best Motorcycle Oils: Keep Your Motorcycle Running at Peak Performance . Their one reservation that (sometimes) applies to my riding pattern is that they say it's not ideal for short interval or city rides. For me, a better choice would be the Mobil 1 V-Twin oil since I tend to ride conservatively and never hit the rev limiter (if the 1100 has one).
 

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Their one reservation that (sometimes) applies to my riding pattern is that they say it's not ideal for short interval or city rides
I read that. Without any reference they state:"Not ideal for low-capacity motorcycles. A bit pricey. Not ideal for short interval or city rides." Based on what?

Don't believe what you read. It's good oil. Also for city riding. Maybe even overkill, but who cares.
 

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I read that. Without any reference they state:"Not ideal for low-capacity motorcycles. A bit pricey. Not ideal for short interval or city rides." Based on what?

Don't believe what you read. It's good oil. Also for city riding. Maybe even overkill, but who cares.
Umm, they picked Motul as the best oil for motorcycles without a stated basis or explanation. Should I not believe that either? :biggrin-new:

One thing about Scrambler engines that isn't true of really high performance Ducati engines is that it's air/oil cooled and runs a lot hotter than liquid cooled engines. For these engines, I'd think an oil specifically designed for higher temps would be a good thing. This review of "best" motorcycle oil: Best Synthetic Motorcycle Oil Review - Best Synthetic Oil Guide picks Mobil 1 V-Twin oil as best for air/oil cooled engines and they do tell you why.

Since winter is coming on and I just had an oil change, I won't need to choose an oil soon.
 

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Can you prove it runs hotter?

The temperature range it runs in is wider, true, but I'm not so certain it runs significantly hotter. I can even see it running too cool if you're riding secondary roads or canyons... maybe in stop and go city traffic yes...


(one of my other bikes is an air/oil cooled DR650, which under most circumstances runs too cool rather than too hot. People measured the oil hardly getting over 90 degrees even in the summer. People cover the oil cooler in the winter)
 

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Can you prove it runs hotter?

The temperature range it runs in is wider, true, but I'm not so certain it runs significantly hotter. I can even see it running too cool if you're riding secondary roads or canyons... maybe in stop and go city traffic yes...


(one of my other bikes is an air/oil cooled DR650, which under most circumstances runs too cool rather than too hot. People measured the oil hardly getting over 90 degrees even in the summer. People cover the oil cooler in the winter)

Well, I can't prove anything, but my leg and butt know to a moral certitude that a Scrambler 1100 runs hotter than a FJ09 or Aprila Mana 850 which are both liquid cooled. So I'm satisfied that for my purposes, a premium motor oil designed for an air cooled engine will likely perform better in my Scrambler than one designed for either all engines or liquid cooled engine. And the FJ09 and Mana will get the other oil (which costs less too).

I'm certainly willing to accept that DR650's run cool but that seems to be an exception among air cooled motorcycle engines. There seems to be almost unanimous agreement among writers discussing the subject that air cooled engines run hotter than liquid cooled engines. This Understand Motorcycle Oil @ MotorCycleAnchor.COM is pretty typical:
"Motorcycles Engines are Special
In most motorcycle engines, those same engine surfaces generally move much faster than they do in car and truck engines, conventionally twice to ten times as fast, due to difference in RPM ranges, stroke lengths, stroke speeds (i.e. - piston speed), etcetera. .Additionally, most modern street-oriented motorcycles have a "wet clutch", which means that the clutch plates also sit in the same oil that the rest of the engine uses to lubricate itself. Most also have the transmission also sharing this same oil. Throw in the fact that some motorcycles are still oil-air cooled (which causes the oil to run 1.5 to 3 times hotter than a water-cooled engine). These four differences (speed, clutch exposure, transmission exposure and oil temp) are the grounds for the basic differences between formulations of motorcycle oils and car oils."

While oil in an oil/air cooled engine being 1.5 to 3 times hotter sounds extreme to me, the writer's sources are listed at the end of the article, so I guess if I cared, I could look them up.
 

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You mistake "hot" for the amount of of heat it sheds. ;-) (try a stock Indian FTR1200: it sheds loads of heat, serious. Way more than my Scrambler, but the coolant never gets over 90 degrees and 80 degrees as long as you're rolling)

So much nonsense, 1.5 to 3 times as hot. lol.

But yeah, it doesn't have a radiator with a fan, that's true. So city traffic can be a bitch...
 

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My bike loves Motul. Loves it.
 
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