Ducati Scrambler Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings. Just joined the forum. I've never owned a Ducati, and hadn't really planned on one till I came across the new Ducati Scramblers. In the last 12 years I've owned a Sportster, a Yamaha XS650, and currently own an 07 KLR650 and a Honda CGL125 ...and a Kawasaki KE250 back in 1980. So I haven't ridden a wide range of bikes. But the Classic and the Enduro just seem to be begging me to buy them. But I'm not familiar with Ducatis at all. My impression from friends who have them, from what little I've read of them is that they are great performing bikes, a bit on the expensive side...and that's it. If you're a current or past Ducati owner, what would you say to someone who has never owned one?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Go in with your eyes open ,,Ducati's are a little more maintenance intensive than the japanese machines,,parts are on the high side,,it really helps if you're handy with tools,,( ie belt changes,oil changes,,ect) that will aid in keeping overall operation costs down,,,i've owned several and never had one "break",,the performance is stellar,,,really hard to believe how much smooth linear power they get out of the engines,,,the sportster pales in comparison,,there really is no comparison in performance to what you listed as your previous bike list,,,you will enter a whole different realm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
965 Posts
Have seen mention of replacing belts that are regular maintenance items having never owned a Ducati before either what are these belts used for on a Ducati? I noticed they mentioned "aluminum belt covers" so I am guessing they may not be too difficult to replace.

I am guessing they are used for the actual motor timing or?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
They actuate the cams,,, yes they are timing belts,,, inspection is the key and using high quality replacements,, and not all that difficult to change
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Go in with your eyes open ,,,the sportster pales in comparison,,there really is no comparison in performance to what you listed as your previous bike list,,,you will enter a whole different realm
My hope is just that--that my other bikes would pale in comparison...well except for the Honda CGL125--you can't really beat that bike! ;)

I'm not married to any one brand of bike, but bikes I'm considering as the next one: Honda CB1100, Triumph Bonneville T100 and Scrambler...or if I stay dual sport: Suzuki DR650. If I had the money, the BMW R9T. But then I saw the new Ducatis!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
I ride a dual sport myself and had a dr650,,,not a bad bike,,,switched to a dr350 and am much happier with it,,,it's a better bike,,,the Ducati's are a little more maintenance intensive but the rewards are great,,,they are a great brand,,,fast and they handle like a dream,,,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
831 Posts
Had many bikes but since 2006 nothing but Ducati, once you ride one you become infected!!!
Go take one for a test ride but take your cheque book with you:angel8:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Owning a Ducati is not the same as owning a Jap bike. Yes, there are more maintenance involved...significantly higher cost of upkeep as well. But thats DUCATI.

Now as far as the Scrambler...

You are taking a leap on something that has not been offered by the company since the 70's and the design has practically been forgotten till they resurrected it. Others tried but was not quite as successful in pulling it off.
IT IS A CULT BIKE. My apologies to those who are offended but thats the reality of it. Its not a Harley or a Yamaha sport bike with a worldwide massive following. Its a Scrambler and thats it. If you are concerned with going fast, this is not the bike. If you are concerned with going on cross country trips, this is not the bike either. Off road use? Get the DR650, it will serve you well.

If you like getting from point A to point B in style, this may work for you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DaveK and SBKen

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I've never owned a Ducati either, and my last 3 bikes were a '09 Yamaha R6, '85 Honda Sabre and a '75 Honda XL-350. I've always been a fan of the Scrambler / Café Racer design, so when Ducati launched this bike, let's just say I knew it would be my next after selling the 3 I had.

For me, Ducati is more than just a brand name, it signifies power, speed, reliability and the known fact that no stone is unturned during design, development and implementation when it comes to the creation of the bike. A premium to a top-notch motorcycle. My biggest mistake in '09 was buying the Yamaha R6 over the Ducati 696 Monster, granted it was my first bike ever, I just felt it wasn't my time.

Luckily, because I'm a fan of this style, the Icon is on my radar. From what I can tell, because this is a premium bike, it requires a particular type of upkeep that is expensive, what in Italy isn't??? To know that my bike is tuned appropriately and maintained with excellent care, I think it's worth the extra $$$ to know I'm riding a safe motorcycle, since there is already enough issues on the road to cause concern (not pointing fingers, but drivers are idiots).

I already took it out for a test ride, 1st gear was a little shaky, but the throttle was smooth, suspension - very comfortable and the ride was like nothing I've ever experienced. I really did fall in love on this bike. I was also looking at the Triumph Bonneville & Scrambler, they were heavier, too wide and a common bike in the southeast U.S., for me I want a unique, head turning bike that rev's the internal engines of any age group.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
.......
IT IS A CULT BIKE.
I'd say IT IS A FUN BIKE!
My apologies to those who are offended but thats the reality of it. Its not a Harley or a Yamaha sport bike with a worldwide massive following.
Thankfully, at least not yet (prolly will be).

It's a Scrambler and thats it. If you are concerned with going fast, this is not the bike.
If you want to go fast enough to have a blast, this bike will work well.
If you are concerned with going on cross country trips, this is not the bike either.
Not for 2-up but solo it's fine for 500 plus mile days. Doing more with less is very possible...and FUN.

Off road use? Get the DR650, it will serve you well.
I have a DR650 and sits in the garage whilst I am having FUN on the Scrambler.

If you like getting from point A to point B in style, this may work for you.
Don't really give a crap about style as long as it's FUN.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
First Ducati as well not sure it's classed just yet as a reliable brand tho!.They are trying but a Two year warranty means they are getting confident!
I bought it for its looks and knew next to nothing about Ducati but having come from Harleys and learnt to avoid the "Harley tax" I know find there's a Ducati tax! Lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I've never owned a Ducati either, and my last 3 bikes were a '09 Yamaha R6, '85 Honda Sabre and a '75 Honda XL-350. I've always been a fan of the Scrambler / Café Racer design, so when Ducati launched this bike, let's just say I knew it would be my next after selling the 3 I had.

For me, Ducati is more than just a brand name, it signifies power, speed, reliability and the known fact that no stone is unturned during design, development and implementation when it comes to the creation of the bike. A premium to a top-notch motorcycle. My biggest mistake in '09 was buying the Yamaha R6 over the Ducati 696 Monster, granted it was my first bike ever, I just felt it wasn't my time.

Luckily, because I'm a fan of this style, the Icon is on my radar. From what I can tell, because this is a premium bike, it requires a particular type of upkeep that is expensive, what in Italy isn't??? To know that my bike is tuned appropriately and maintained with excellent care, I think it's worth the extra $$$ to know I'm riding a safe motorcycle, since there is already enough issues on the road to cause concern (not pointing fingers, but drivers are idiots).

I already took it out for a test ride, 1st gear was a little shaky, but the throttle was smooth, suspension - very comfortable and the ride was like nothing I've ever experienced. I really did fall in love on this bike. I was also looking at the Triumph Bonneville & Scrambler, they were heavier, too wide and a common bike in the southeast U.S., for me I want a unique, head turning bike that rev's the internal engines of any age group.
Wow, what a load of bollocks. Do you write copy for the Ducati PR department?

It's a budget bike, built down to a price to appeal to young riders and especially emerging markets. It's a simple 2-valve air cooled twin, there's nothing fancy about it that should cost a fortune with servicing. Belts for the desmo system make it slightly more complicated, but even a numpty like me can change them armed only with a tool kit and a free guitar tuning app on my phone.

I like the bike for what it is, but there is no magical mystique. Ducati have built a simple bike, thrown in some nice styling cues, and as long as you can live with or replace the truly rubbish components (eg. suspension), it's a pleasant bike to live with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Wow, what a load of bollocks. Do you write copy for the Ducati PR department?
I can't write to save my life. Thanks for thinking it could have been written for Ducati PR.

As for the bike itself, I couldn't agree more. I'm not a gear head, so I can't achieve certain things you mentioned without reading. What I love about this bike is the style it represents with modern touches. I'm not buying the "Ducati" story they're trying to see when riding this bike (tight jeans, slick hair and googles instead of a full face helmet), rather, I love the style and when I took it for a test ride I loved it. I'm now just waiting for the yellow icon to come in and I'll buy it, red is not a color that perks me up to ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
I've had many ducati's and they've all been reliable but not all comfortable, in fact the scrambler is by far the best, mega cool, fast enough and a blast to ride. I've not really felt the built to budget too much apart from maybe the firm suspension but it handles ace! You will not regret buying one and this is one of only a few bikes that I think is a keeper. Just enjoy (a few second hand ones out there (if your in the uk) at the moment where you might save £500+)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Good point Armo, I had a solid deal in place with a dealer for my icon that included a few "extras" just didn't want the red Icon. I'm painting it matte black, but before I go down that path, I'd like to put some miles on the bike before winter season hits hard in the Southeast.

The only issue I found in the demo bike I rode was that 1st gear was incredibly choppy in the throttle department. Once out of it, the bike was smooth sailing between gears and downshifting. Maybe the bike was broken in wrong, or just needed tuned, no idea, but it was the smoothest ride I'd been on since the Harley 1200 Custom I last rode.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
Hello

The choppy throttle in 1st gear is just a matter of being used to your bike. My Scrambler is my third Ducati, I owned before two ST2 (Sport Touring), that were much powerful than the Scrambler, much comfortable, protective and so on, but I've never had the same smile on my face than when I'm riding my Scrambler. I also noticed during the test ride, the choppy throttle, but after some says with my own Scrambler, I'm not disturbed any more by this.

Many guys here told you, a Ducati is a reliable bike if you take care of it, by a regular inspection. You won't go as far as on many japanese bikes if you never care of your bike. But, if you do, it will go very far. I sold my second ST2 after 120000 km and I know many other ST that have much more kilometers than that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
My yellow Icon is slightly choppy but not horrendous, I find using super unleaded smooths it out a bit and people who have race exhaust also say this smoothed out the response. Hope you find one soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I was told by my dealer probably end of November for a yellow one to be in stock. I'm sure I'll get used to it to a point it won't bother me more than it did during the test ride. Thanks for the comments guys!
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top