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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not having a compressor at home I either need a bicycle pump, or I'm at the whim of service stations (garages to you Yanks). And most of the ones here have reinforced hoses that don't bend very well. Couple this to the longest valve stems I've ever seen on a bike results in the front being merely very difficult and the rear nigh on impossible. That results in lots of swearing and skinned knuckles.

So next tyre change will involve getting some nicer 90 degree valve stems fitted, so I don't inadvertently teach children in cars nearby new words.

* I could just not swear, but I'm Australian. You might as well tell a Brit to stop drinking tea or an American to stop invading other countries.

** If you can't decide if I'm being a wiseass or not, I really am. I'm not racist, I hate everyone equally (except the French).
 

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barfridge, I've thought the 90 degree valve stems would be a good idea too but I found that I usually use a small bicycle pump to top my bikes up. I've got a few bikes that I alternate between for weekend rides and they all have straight valve stems, tyre pressure usually is only down a few psi and doesn't take long to top up with the pump. Mines a small pump with the valve bit out the side so probably wouldn't fit a 90 degree valve stem so I just decided to stick with the straight stems. I do have a compressor under the house but its just easier to use the bike pump and I'd rather trust my own gauge than the servo ones.

Besides, nobody can hear you swearing at home :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A bike pump at home would mask the problem, not fix it. And knowing my luck it would rear it's ugly head when I was out in the bush, then I would be eaten by a drop bear.

In summary, a bicycle pump is no defence against Australian fauna.
 

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A bike pump at home would mask the problem, not fix it. And knowing my luck it would rear it's ugly head when I was out in the bush, then I would be eaten by a drop bear.

In summary, a bicycle pump is no defence against Australian fauna.
Help with translation please of what is a DROP Bear. Never heard off them and need to expand my knowledge. You can make a short flexi coupling up with a tyre valve, bit of pipe and nipple fitting to use if needed. Made mine with hose and fitting off old foot pump and tyre valve for my fork lift truck been going for years.
 

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A bike pump at home would mask the problem, not fix it. And knowing my luck it would rear it's ugly head when I was out in the bush, then I would be eaten by a drop bear.

In summary, a bicycle pump is no defence against Australian fauna.
Actually a bike pump would be a lot better in the bush than 90 degree valve stems, not too many servos along bush tracks, just make sure you buy a solid pump to double as a club for any amorous wildlife.
 

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Spend a lot of time in Wales trying to avoid sheep they are so unpredictable . At least the badgers are usually dead in the roads so easier to avoid.
Dreading the advance of wild boar from the south after seeing a car written off after hitting one.

You can make beer out of nettles so will tolerate them.
 

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I agree the Americans should not have invaded Normandy. German is a prettier language than French anyway. :)

One of these 12v pumps would suit you well.

 

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I bought this Husky inflator for $25 at a home supply chain here in the US. I have a Dodge Ram Pickup with 20 inch wheels and it is powerful enough fill up my truck tires. The stem locks-on and is shallow. I have no problems filling the Scrambler tires. I check my tires before a long ride or every week or so. The cord is pretty long and will reach all four wheels on my truck plus another vehicle. I used to work in some pretty remote areas where you have to plug and fill your own tires. Kind of like where you live.
I also have the gauge shown in the photo. It has a 90 degree stem that fits in tight spots. The best options are that it is easy to read and remembers the pressure until you push the button on the side to release the pressure. I don't know where I bought this. It's old and I have had it for years.

For home checking this works well for me. For on the road gas stations, 90 degree stems might be a good idea with the addition of a good tire gauge. Never trust the gas station ones.
IMG_1275.jpg
 
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