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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, so I realize that no one here has actually ridden the bike yet, but are there any opinions or speculations of the suitability of the Scrambler as a first bike? I have a buddy who started on a 800 cc Diavel (which seems crazy to me) and he's telling me to go for it. Then a lot of forum posts I read say you should start on a 250 cc bike, so I'm also sort of considering trying a Honda CB300F (only $3,999!) for a year or so before making the jump to a Scrambler.

Just for the sake of this discussion, let's leave used bikes out of the picture - shopping for one seems like a headache to me, and the used market varies so much by geographic location - here in Eastern NC, most of what I see are fully-faired sport bikes, and cruisers (and most of them bikes that I would consider to be too powerful for a beginner).

So, what do you guys think? Is a Scrambler unrealistic as a first bike? Better second bike, maybe? Any other noobs putting a deposit down and going for it?

EDIT: Also, I'm taking the MSF course, have a book to read (Proficient Motorcycling), and know to budget a fair bit ($1000-$1500) on protective riding gear.
 

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From what I have read and seen it would be an ideal first bike for someone. I am a long time 45 year plus rider and I am buying one as a downsizing step from my Concours 14
 

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I am 52. Been riding since 16 and then a break and back at 35 ish and then thats when all my experience came along. My biggest bike in CC was my monster 1100s and very usable and still friendly. Probs as powerful as my Monster s4 and 748 too. I am hoping the 800 scrambler will offer me more fun without the top speed and reviews say its nippy and fast away which is all I want from a bike. I dont think its a first bike really and would always hope that they would ride something lesser not only in value and cc in case of the obvious crashes which most have.
 

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I will be 59 this year and started riding when I was 9. For a first bike I would think the Scrambler would be a good choice I put my deposit down on an Icon because I thought it would be a fun bike to ride around Northern California. Back in 1995 I bought a BMW K75 that I kept for about 8 years. It was very similar to the Scrambler - seat height, riding position, engine size, power and torque. It was also very easy and fun to ride. Not a crotch rocket, but it wasn't supposed to be. The difference with the new Scrambler is that it's skinnier and a hundred pounds lighter than my old BMW. Should be very easy to ride.

Of course the best way to know is to just go out and ride a bunch of different bikes and see what feels right for you. Most dealers will let you test ride. Especially the used ones. Size, weight, power, seat height and riding position vary greatly.
 

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My first (and last) bike was a 2004 Triumph Bonneville America that I bought new. I had also read advice to get a small bike to start out with, but I went with a medium bike. I'm really glad I did. I thought it was an excellent first bike, and it was easy for me to handle and was't intimidating. It had a 790 cc twin that made 61 hp and 44 torques, and it weighed almost 100 pounds more dry than the Scrambler is wet. So clearly it wasn't on the same level of performance as the Scrambler will be, but I don't think it would be too much. It's light and will handle much easier and better than my Triumph did, it'll just be quite a bit quicker.
 

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I started on a honda 50 3 speed automatic I think is what they called it, No clutch. I graduated from that to an 80. After that I went to a suzuki Intruder 800 and a Suzuki marauder 800. this was at the age of 16. My father only let me ride the 800 when I was with him because he thought me to be wreckless (part of might have been that my license only allowed for a 450 cc or smaller) I then went to a honda 250 rebel to commute to work on. In my opinion if you have had a little bit of motorcycle experience. Like the training class or from dirt bikes or 4 wheelers and are familiar with the controls then the bike probably wont matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the advice, guys. I will admit I am a total novice, no experience with dirt bikes or anything. As much as my heart is telling me to go for the Scrambler, I think I might be better off with a smaller "starter" bike for a year or so. In the end, it will probably make me a better rider. Which means I'll be shopping for a 2016 or 2017 Scrambler, I guess. I won't be able to get a bike until late summer anyway (I'm currently deployed), so I'm going to keep my eyes open for some real-life reviews in a couple of months and see how people feel about the bike's suitability for a novice. Thanks again.
 

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If that's the case me personally i would opt for a dual sport. So when you are ready to upgrade you wont want to sell it. Then you can have 2 bikes
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I will be 59 this year and started riding when I was 9. For a first bike I would think the Scrambler would be a good choice I put my deposit down on an Icon because I thought it would be a fun bike to ride around Northern California. Back in 1995 I bought a BMW K75 that I kept for about 8 years. It was very similar to the Scrambler - seat height, riding position, engine size, power and torque. It was also very easy and fun to ride. Not a crotch rocket, but it wasn't supposed to be. The difference with the new Scrambler is that it's skinnier and a hundred pounds lighter than my old BMW. Should be very easy to ride.

Of course the best way to know is to just go out and ride a bunch of different bikes and see what feels right for you. Most dealers will let you test ride. Especially the used ones. Size, weight, power, seat height and riding position vary greatly.
I do like the look of that K75. I see a few pretty clean ones in the $2K-$3K range. Might be a good option to start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If that's the case me personally i would opt for a dual sport. So when you are ready to upgrade you wont want to sell it. Then you can have 2 bikes
Not a bad idea, either. I'd actually like to get some experience in the dirt, as well, since I hear it really helps with your riding everywhere else (i.e., if you can handle a bike well in a low-traction off-road situation, pavement will be a breeze).
 

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I wouldnt say avoid the scrambler at all. It is a good start bike be it a reasonably expensive one and probs more practical than a Monster 696 with similar power. You need to test ride one or just buy a cheap bike for 3- 4 months.
That is why I suggest Dual sport, Most people that I know who purchase a " starter" bike end up wanting more within 3-4 months instead of what they think will be 2-3 years.
 

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Okay, so here we go... Now you get to read all of my advice.

Let me start with this fun fact of life. You WILL drop your first bike. I don't care if you are the most careful person on God's green earth. You will drop it. Do you want to drop a 10k, brand new Ducati, or do you want to drop a 1K Honda Rebel? I think the choice is clear.

Can a novice rider handle the Scrambler (or most bikes for that matter)? Yes. Don't think that just because the bike CAN go a million miles an hour, that it does all the time. The rider has the responsibility in his right hand. Whether the tap opens to let all hell loose, or just a little squirt of fuel through, things can go wrong VERY QUICKLY. A lot of cc's or a very few cc's can still land you in the hospital.

As for gear. It is good to see that you are budgeting for good gear. Buy the best/most gear that you can afford. Got a $10 head, put a $10 helmet on it, as the saying goes. As a new rider, ATGATT is going to be your best friend. If something goes wrong, you will walk away with a bruised ego and perhaps a bruised hip, but at least you will walk away. Without the gear, a 10mph drop in a parking lot can be the end of your days, and it wont matter if you are sitting on a liter bike or a Honda Ruckus.
 

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Okay, so here we go... Now you get to read all of my advice.

Let me start with this fun fact of life. You WILL drop your first bike. I don't care if you are the most careful person on God's green earth. You will drop it. Do you want to drop a 10k, brand new Ducati, or do you want to drop a 1K Honda Rebel? I think the choice is clear.

Can a novice rider handle the Scrambler (or most bikes for that matter)? Yes. Don't think that just because the bike CAN go a million miles an hour, that it does all the time. The rider has the responsibility in his right hand. Whether the tap opens to let all hell loose, or just a little squirt of fuel through, things can go wrong VERY QUICKLY. A lot of cc's or a very few cc's can still land you in the hospital.

As for gear. It is good to see that you are budgeting for good gear. Buy the best/most gear that you can afford. Got a $10 head, put a $10 helmet on it, as the saying goes. As a new rider, ATGATT is going to be your best friend. If something goes wrong, you will walk away with a bruised ego and perhaps a bruised hip, but at least you will walk away. Without the gear, a 10mph drop in a parking lot can be the end of your days, and it wont matter if you are sitting on a liter bike or a Honda Ruckus.
That't what the replaceable side plates are for.on the tank.
 

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That't what the replaceable side plates are for.on the tank.
I low sided my first bike (the then new aforementioned Triumph Bonneville America) a few months in on the left side at about 20 mph. It took the blinker, the clutch lever, the grip, the mirror, the foot peg, and the exhaust pipe. Oddly, the tank was just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I low sided my first bike (the then new aforementioned Triumph Bonneville America) a few months in on the left side at about 20 mph. It took the blinker, the clutch lever, the grip, the mirror, the foot peg, and the exhaust pipe. Oddly, the tank was just fine.
Cost to repair, if you don't mind?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Okay, so here we go... Now you get to read all of my advice.

Let me start with this fun fact of life. You WILL drop your first bike. I don't care if you are the most careful person on God's green earth. You will drop it. Do you want to drop a 10k, brand new Ducati, or do you want to drop a 1K Honda Rebel? I think the choice is clear.

Can a novice rider handle the Scrambler (or most bikes for that matter)? Yes. Don't think that just because the bike CAN go a million miles an hour, that it does all the time. The rider has the responsibility in his right hand. Whether the tap opens to let all hell loose, or just a little squirt of fuel through, things can go wrong VERY QUICKLY. A lot of cc's or a very few cc's can still land you in the hospital.

As for gear. It is good to see that you are budgeting for good gear. Buy the best/most gear that you can afford. Got a $10 head, put a $10 helmet on it, as the saying goes. As a new rider, ATGATT is going to be your best friend. If something goes wrong, you will walk away with a bruised ego and perhaps a bruised hip, but at least you will walk away. Without the gear, a 10mph drop in a parking lot can be the end of your days, and it wont matter if you are sitting on a liter bike or a Honda Ruckus.
Yeah, you're saying a lot of what I'm thinking. The Scrambler is not a rationale choice at this point. I'm sure it'll be around for a few model years, though, so no rush. Just need to hurry up and find a starter bike! Thanks for the sanity check.
 

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Crash sliders are a must. Only thing it LOOKS LIKE is they extended the heat shield too far in front of the engine mount so cutting back or removing or remaking will need to happen. I wouldnt not have sliders now and will also get a rear set too as they seem to use a hollow axle there too.
 

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($1000-$1500) on protective riding gear.[/QUOTE]
Okay, so I realize that no one here has actually ridden the bike yet, but are there any opinions or speculations of the suitability of the Scrambler as a first bike? I have a buddy who started on a 800 cc Diavel (which seems crazy to me) and he's telling me to go for it.

($1000-$1500) on protective riding gear.
I didn't know there was such a thing as an 800cc Diavel ???
Maybe it's just not available in the UK. Does it still have the 240 back tyre ?
 
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