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The new parts finally arrived to the dealer and they are now replacing both cylinders. These are the 2020 references they are putting on my 2019 1100 Sport:

Vertical: 12022771C
Horizontal: 12022761C

2018 stock version (affected by the problem): 12022771AB and 12022761AB
2019 stock version (affected by the problem): 12022771BB and 12022761BB
2020 versions are coming directly with the new 12022771C and 12022761C cylinders.
 

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Well I have been in denial with on 18 Scrambler But after 2000 miles its apparent that it has developed the Slap. I have an appointment with the dealer on 12/18. Thanks everyone for ringing the bell on this issue. I will keep everyone up to date on progress.
 

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Discussion Starter #164
The new parts finally arrived to the dealer and they are now replacing both cylinders. These are the 2020 references they are putting on my 2019 1100 Sport:

Vertical: 12022771C
Horizontal: 12022761C

2018 stock version (affected by the problem): 12022771AB and 12022761AB
2019 stock version (affected by the problem): 12022771BB and 12022761BB
2020 versions are coming directly with the new 12022771C and 12022761C cylinders.
Let's hope they got it right third time around. I'm quite sure there where already 2 part numbers in the beginning so this might already be the 4th version of the cilinders. Well mine still sounds fine after 2000km sinds the change. Don't know wich partnumbers where used so🤞
 

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Well I have been in denial with on 18 Scrambler But after 2000 miles its apparent that it has developed the Slap. I have an appointment with the dealer on 12/18. Thanks everyone for ringing the bell on this issue. I will keep everyone up to date on progress.
Keep us posted. My 2018 has about 600 miles on it, It is not in warranty, I thought I heard it one time, but was not sure I did the last ride this weekend.
 

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I spoke to my dealer on Friday and they said they are working on another scramble 1100 with same issue. Their 4th this year. Mine is next up. Said the repair is not as easy as i thought. Will keep everyone posted.
 

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My dealer confirmed my piston slap this morning and is putting in a claim to Ducati. Not sure of timing of the repair or return. They said they have done a couple previously and Ducati usually send the piston kit pretty quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #170
this is a big red flag for anyone considering an 1100 Scrambler period.

Damn pity really because it's a terrific bike...
Nowadays almost all bikes have issues and long lists off recalls. The important thing is how things are solved and that owners share their experiences so most thing can get adressed early on while you are still under warrenty. And if things get known enough it will become harder to deny certain claims even when tje warrenty is over.
But piston slap is pretty commen on loads of vehicles of many makes and doesn't always mean the worst.
 

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"piston slap is pretty commen on loads of vehicles of many makes and doesn't always mean the worst"

I don't remember "oh, by the way, piston slap is a common fault with these bikes, it's not that serious an issue so try not to let it bother you" from the selling dealer .

It's not the end of the world and to a reasonable degree you can 'ride around it' by keeping to certain engine speed / load combinations but......it's not really acceptable either.

I have had a good relationship with my dealer over the last eight years since I bought the Diavel and trust that if things go pear shaped they will look after me.
Isn't the factory warranty why most of us buy new in the first place?
I have made the service manager and the owner of the shop aware that my bike is 'one of the noisy ones' and that i trust them to work through any issues which may arise.

For now I am really enjoying the bike and we'll see how it goes I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter #172
Y
"piston slap is pretty commen on loads of vehicles of many makes and doesn't always mean the worst"

I don't remember "oh, by the way, piston slap is a common fault with these bikes, it's not that serious an issue so try not to let it bother you" from the selling dealer .

It's not the end of the world and to a reasonable degree you can 'ride around it' by keeping to certain engine speed / load combinations but......it's not really acceptable either.

I have had a good relationship with my dealer over the last eight years since I bought the Diavel and trust that if things go pear shaped they will look after me.
Isn't the factory warranty why most of us buy new in the first place?
I have made the service manager and the owner of the shop aware that my bike is 'one of the noisy ones' and that i trust them to work through any issues which may arise.

For now I am really enjoying the bike and we'll see how it goes I guess.
I'm not realy sure what you expect of your dealer but I deal just with facts. I've owned many bikes of very reputable brands and all of them had problems and recalls. Some of these I found unacceptable like braking hubs and failing brake and abs systems(can you guess the brand?). Some companies like VW and BMW have so many car engine problems that I wouldn't even considder buying a car of them or another manufacturers cars that uses engines from them. But this still means that what ever other brand I choose they are bound to have their problems as well.
If you rely on your dealer to inform you about this when you walk in there to buy your new motorbike or car then I'm afraid your in for a lot of unpleasent surprises in the future.
But the statement was that the piston slap was a big red flag but if this was the case not a single VW TFSI powered car would exchange hands anymore and all the other cars powered with timing chain braking and skipping issues as used in BMW's, Mini's , Citroëns and Peugeots. Most people probably won't know or if they buy new don't care feeling they will be covered by there warrenties.
Piston slap has been a problem with many Ducati's for many decades and people are still buying them. If this is acceptable is up to you but I know I prefer it to failing brakes or braking frames or hubs. The nr. 1thing that makes Ducati less popular in our market and therefore hurt resale value are the high expected maintanance costs.
 

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I'd read this thread before i bought the bike.
I've been of the opinion that my Diavel is a rattly bugger, as was my Speed triple.
Then again, so was my Mach IV and I loved that one too.

Buy a VW? Probably not.

The "oh, by the way, there is an issue with piston slap" comment?
I must have missed the sarcasm button as I posted.

I've owned around fifty bikes and thankfully most of them have been largely trouble free.
Maintenance costs on most brands are expensive.
I do what i can of my own bikes and for the rest, there is the dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter #174
I'd read this thread before i bought the bike.
I've been of the opinion that my Diavel is a rattly bugger, as was my Speed triple.
Then again, so was my Mach IV and I loved that one too.

Buy a VW? Probably not.

The "oh, by the way, there is an issue with piston slap" comment?
I must have missed the sarcasm button as I posted.

I've owned around fifty bikes and thankfully most of them have been largely trouble free.
Maintenance costs on most brands are expensive.
I do what i can of my own bikes and for the rest, there is the dealer.
You just have to be a bit lucky and taking care of your bike and treating it with a bit of care will also go a long way most of the time. I have owned a new '98 Buell S1 White Lightning knowing fully well that this was a bike with lot's of problems when I bought it but I just had to have it. It also had many recalls in the 3 years that I owned it including new rear shock, motor mount, rear swing arm, front brake disc to name but a few. But everything was handled superbly by the dealer and boy was this bike a blast to ride and a joy to own. And in these 3 years I only threw fresh oil in it and replaced tires and brake pads at an alarmingly high frequency ;-) And then sold it loosing less then 1000$ a year. Sometimes you buy things mainly with the hart and other times with your head I guess.
 

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Nowadays almost all bikes have issues and long lists off recalls. The important thing is how things are solved and that owners share their experiences so most thing can get adressed early on while you are still under warrenty. And if things get known enough it will become harder to deny certain claims even when tje warrenty is over.
But piston slap is pretty commen on loads of vehicles of many makes and doesn't always mean the worst.

I agree Skippy - issues will surface, but it really is how the manufacturer deals with them that determines (for me) ultimately whether or not I will stick with the brand. The piston slap with my 2018 Sport wasn't nearly as frustrating and annoying as Ducati's approach to it, which (at the time at least), appears to be deferring to the dealerships to address it or not with zero accountability or oversight. For me, that was/is the dealbreaker, not the piston slap itself. Clearly Ducati knows there's an issue; they've revised the parts numbers, that itself is affirmation that they know there's an issue.

Conversely, my Toyota has had a couple of recalls since new. Not only does Toyota send me a letter explaining the issue, I get it covered at the dealership no questions asked, they give me a loaner, a wash and even a discounted price for routine maintenance while its in for the recall (oil change and tire rotation for $20 - normally close to $100). While that's a vehicle versus a bike, can you imagine if Ducati treated its customers this same way? If they did, piston slap or not, I wouldn't be riding a KTM now.
 
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I agree Skippy - issues will surface, but it really is how the manufacturer deals with them that determines (for me) ultimately whether or not I will stick with the brand. The piston slap with my 2018 Sport wasn't nearly as frustrating and annoying as Ducati's approach to it, which (at the time at least), appears to be deferring to the dealerships to address it or not with zero accountability or oversight. For me, that was/is the dealbreaker, not the piston slap itself. Clearly Ducati knows there's an issue; they've revised the parts numbers, that itself is affirmation that they know there's an issue.

Conversely, my Toyota has had a couple of recalls since new. Not only does Toyota send me a letter explaining the issue, I get it covered at the dealership no questions asked, they give me a loaner, a wash and even a discounted price for routine maintenance while its in for the recall (oil change and tire rotation for $20 - normally close to $100). While that's a vehicle versus a bike, can you imagine if Ducati treated its customers this same way? If they did, piston slap or not, I wouldn't be riding a KTM now.
100% agree. The way you where treated by your dealer and Ducati is really poor and also is something that is really disapointing to me. My dealer was great and admitted to the problem right away. The fact that Ducati is keeping quite about the issue reflects very poorly on them and will certainly make me think long and hard buying another bike from them. Sad thing is that the same story can be told about BMW wich is one of my favorite motorcycle brands but there just have been to many issues wich they didn't own up to right away in the past to put me of them.
A great dealer is key I guess.
 

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100% agree. The way you where treated by your dealer and Ducati is really poor and also is something that is really disapointing to me. My dealer was great and admitted to the problem right away. The fact that Ducati is keeping quite about the issue reflects very poorly on them and will certainly make me think long and hard buying another bike from them. Sad thing is that the same story can be told about BMW wich is one of my favorite motorcycle brands but there just have been to many issues wich they didn't own up to right away in the past to put me of them.
A great dealer is key I guess.
Having a great dealer is definitely the key! I understand that warranty/recall work isn't exactly the most lucrative stream of business for any dealership, but it is necessary for time to time. If you don't handle it properly, why would anyone come back to you? But you're right, this also reflects poorly on Ducati as a brand, because while the dealers are independent operations, there are measures they can take corporately to ensure the customer isn't getting the run around or ignored for a known factory defect.

Years back, there was a rear brake issue with the 899 Panigale. A friend of mine had to replace his rear brake assembly twice, and even though it was under factory warranty Ducati refused to cover it and instead cited it as normal 'wear and tear' or some other equally preposterous conclusion. After several years, they finally owned it and issued a formal recall. But god only knows if anyone lost their life or were injured as a result of this delay. I also understand BMW had a similar approach with a rear bearing assembly in an 800 model that was prone to premature wear and failure.

While I still like Ducatis overall, and actually do miss the 1100 from time to time, I don't think I will come back to the brand, at least not anytime soon. The dealership and service options in my area are now even more limited since the last real reputable Ducati maintenance shop went out of business, and the dealership I bought my bike from lost its Ducati franchise license. Can't say I didn't see that coming; they just weren't moving enough units to sustain the brand and my experience with "service" was not unique. The only remaining dealership has a terrible reputation for service, so that also factored into my decision to go with a different brand altogether.
 
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Hey guys, for prosterity, as it’s not an 1100, and because I have found nothing else out there, my 2019 800 is currently in the shop having both cylinder heads replaced due to “premature wear.”
I had no metallic sound, and this being my first bike, let alone Ducati, I only ever heard the desmo sound... nothing like the sound in the posted videos, for sure.
I was due for 7500k mile Desmo service in September (I know, I can’t stay off of it). Due to covid, the dealer couldn’t get me in until after the riding season, it went in with just over 8k miles on it middle of November. Dealer called me the beginning of December to tell me they had found some premature wear and had sent videos and been working with Ducati regarding it. Ducati had agreed to replace both cylinders and all associated parts, all on back order, expected in January. Just talked to the dealer today and the parts just came in. Because it’s winter they are going to deliver the bike when it’s done. I don’t know if this is the same issue, but what else could premature cylinder wear be? I will ask them for more info when it’s done. Super happy with the service at my dealership, and at the very least, as stated, the issue is possible on all engines I suppose.
 

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Discussion Starter #179
Hey guys, for prosterity, as it’s not an 1100, and because I have found nothing else out there, my 2019 800 is currently in the shop having both cylinder heads replaced due to “premature wear.”
I had no metallic sound, and this being my first bike, let alone Ducati, I only ever heard the desmo sound... nothing like the sound in the posted videos, for sure.
I was due for 7500k mile Desmo service in September (I know, I can’t stay off of it). Due to covid, the dealer couldn’t get me in until after the riding season, it went in with just over 8k miles on it middle of November. Dealer called me the beginning of December to tell me they had found some premature wear and had sent videos and been working with Ducati regarding it. Ducati had agreed to replace both cylinders and all associated parts, all on back order, expected in January. Just talked to the dealer today and the parts just came in. Because it’s winter they are going to deliver the bike when it’s done. I don’t know if this is the same issue, but what else could premature cylinder wear be? I will ask them for more info when it’s done. Super happy with the service at my dealership, and at the very least, as stated, the issue is possible on all engines I suppose.
That dealer is a keeper! Good to see that they are still out there.Hope you enjoy your bike even more after it returns. Also had the 800 and it's a lovely bike.
 

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Hey guys, for prosterity, as it’s not an 1100, and because I have found nothing else out there, my 2019 800 is currently in the shop having both cylinder heads replaced due to “premature wear.”
I had no metallic sound, and this being my first bike, let alone Ducati, I only ever heard the desmo sound... nothing like the sound in the posted videos, for sure.
I was due for 7500k mile Desmo service in September (I know, I can’t stay off of it). Due to covid, the dealer couldn’t get me in until after the riding season, it went in with just over 8k miles on it middle of November. Dealer called me the beginning of December to tell me they had found some premature wear and had sent videos and been working with Ducati regarding it. Ducati had agreed to replace both cylinders and all associated parts, all on back order, expected in January. Just talked to the dealer today and the parts just came in. Because it’s winter they are going to deliver the bike when it’s done. I don’t know if this is the same issue, but what else could premature cylinder wear be? I will ask them for more info when it’s done. Super happy with the service at my dealership, and at the very least, as stated, the issue is possible on all engines I suppose.
You should start a dedicated 800 thread with this message at the top junebugged, then it doesn't get lost in the 1100 chatter. It will be worthwhile to note if this effects any other 800s – strength in numbers unall that. I have a 2015 Icon, sadly I'm not as good as clocking up the kms as you are but after 14,000 mine's still good (FTR).
 
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