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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read on here somewhere that you can't or shouldn't lift the Scrambler more than about a centimeter/half inch. My new rear shock should come in the mail today (fingers crossed!) and it has a height-adjustable feature I've been keen to use. My toes have been dragging in the twisties so I'd love to go up another inch or so higher, but don't want to do anything catastrophic to my bike.

Can anyone please explain why we shouldn't do this? There's also those who might want to lift the bike more for better off-road capabilities, but it would be nice to know the details on why we should skip such a venture. Thanks!!
 

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Lifting the rear of the bike will steepen the head angle. This will make the bike turn in faster and reduce stability. If it is too much you might find that the bike becomes prone to tank slappers and/or the front end wants to tuck in if you are cornering hard.
If you raise the back you should raise the front by a similar amount, usually by dropping the forks in the yokes, to maintain the steering geometry. This can't be done easily on the Scrambler because the forks are already flush with the top yoke
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Agreed, the geometry would change if you did one and not the other, so you'd definitely want to do both. My question though is, is there anything stopping you from raising the back (and the front, probably via respringing) more than 1 inch or so? Any obstruction that would make it so you CAN'T do it without modifying the frame, swingarm, or other part of the stock bike?
 

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If "your toes are dragging in the twisties" it is a lot easier to move your feet to 'cover' the shift/brake pedals or place balls of feet on pegs vs. raising suspension.:happy1:
 

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Ladyeclectic you can lift the rear of any bike, no issue, to a certain point.. Raising the rear will make the bike steer faster and feel "more planted" which is good if you are a sporty rider. And it will increase ground clearance. It sounds like you are a sporty rider if you are dragging your toes frequently.
It's fine to do this but if you raise it TOO far the downside is that the bike will weave and become unstable at speed in a straight line. So like all good stuff it's a compromise. So raise it as much as you like and if it starts to weave drop it back a bit.Cool.
If you let the forks slide up through the yokes, this lowers the front and again the bike will steer faster. But this reduces ground clearance. not good on the Scrambler.
What make of shock are you getting? There is not much room on the scrambler to fit a ride height adjuster so i am curious.
The usual method to adjust ride height is to preload the spring which is available on the standard scrambler shock.
raising the rear by 15mm from standard will make a huge difference to turn in speed, and it's around the limit for most bikes before weave sets in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm getting the JRi shock from SB Suspension, it's supposed to be here sometime today. TBH this'll be the first time playing around with a non-stock bike shock, hence the question. I'm 100% sure I'll get some lift just from the stiffer spring on the new shock which may be enough, but the JRi comes with a height adjustment that I might want to play with at a later date. I have no idea how much height the new shock can give, but wanted to be sure that if I did mess with that feature, I wouldn't bork up the bike. ;)

Someone also mentioned the front suspension options available right now also raise the front a tiny bit. So to keep things even that might work out for the best.
 

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I'm getting the JRi shock from SB Suspension, it's supposed to be here sometime today. TBH this'll be the first time playing around with a non-stock bike shock, hence the question. I'm 100% sure I'll get some lift just from the stiffer spring on the new shock which may be enough, but the JRi comes with a height adjustment that I might want to play with at a later date. I have no idea how much height the new shock can give, but wanted to be sure that if I did mess with that feature, I wouldn't bork up the bike. ;)

Someone also mentioned the front suspension options available right now also raise the front a tiny bit. So to keep things even that might work out for the best.
Can I suggest you have a word with Ken at SB, He's the best one to advise you , after all he is the expert :rolleyes:
 

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I'm getting the JRi shock from SB Suspension, it's supposed to be here sometime today. TBH this'll be the first time playing around with a non-stock bike shock, hence the question. I'm 100% sure I'll get some lift just from the stiffer spring on the new shock which may be enough, but the JRi comes with a height adjustment that I might want to play with at a later date. I have no idea how much height the new shock can give, but wanted to be sure that if I did mess with that feature, I wouldn't bork up the bike. ;)

Someone also mentioned the front suspension options available right now also raise the front a tiny bit. So to keep things even that might work out for the best.
Please don't play around with suspension. Leave it to the experts. We all know when something is wrong but a few adjustments can be very dangerous. Out of the box most new bikes default to a low side crash it's really easy to mess things up and get a high side crash situation. Please don't take any risks.
 
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