Ducati Scrambler Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Noticed while I had my bike up on a rear wheel stand to grease my chain that the wheel stuck on one spot (pads made more contact with rotor).

I gave it a few spins and noticed lateral movement of my caliper towards the wheel, right at the spot where the wheel stuck a bit. Caliper moved back away from the wheel and wheel spun freely.

I did a quick search online and found that this particular symptom means that the caliper needs to be readjusted. (bolts loosened, apply brake, tighten bolts, spin wheel) rinse, repeat till it doesn't move laterally anymore.

What I don't understand is how to do that on the Scrambler rear caliper?

I checked the workshop manual and honestly, don't know what's going on there...am I unscrewing the bolt that the brake line is attached to? Does that mean the brake fluid has to be drained? Is that the only bolt that holds the caliper in place other than the sliders it's on? (confused as heck here)

Why can't it be as easy as the front to adjust? :)

Thanks to anyone that can offer some help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
No, the tires were changed more than a season ago. I also suspect a bent rotor but I thought maybe it could be the caliper needing to be adjusted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
868 Posts
Sorry I don’t mean any disrespect but if you don’t know anything about brakes get it looked at professionally it’s safer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Sorry I don’t mean any disrespect but if you don’t know anything about brakes get it looked at professionally it’s safer.
The only thing I'm confused about after looking at the workshop manual is if there's a way to loosen the rear caliper and re-adjust it while clamping down on the brake itself...same as would be done with the front for example.

No offence taken but "not knowing anything about brakes" is a bit of a stretch comment. I know quite a bit about our brakes and service my own brakes and almost everything else on the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Just did a bit more digging, doesn't look like the caliper can be adjusted. So I guess I'm left with warped rotor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
868 Posts
Sorry if I sound like a know it all cos’ I don’t know a lot it’s just experience. The rear caliper is called a floating caliper for the reason Max described above.
The reason for thinking you didn’t know about brakes was the comment about undoing the banjo bolt, which is obviously incorrect to the experienced do it yourselfer.
Once again I didn’t want to cause offence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Sorry if I sound like a know it all cos’ I don’t know a lot it’s just experience. The rear caliper is called a floating caliper for the reason Max described above.
The reason for thinking you didn’t know about brakes was the comment about undoing the banjo bolt, which is obviously incorrect to the experienced do it yourselfer.
Once again I didn’t want to cause offence.
No offence, I just never touched the rear caliper yet, other than changing my brake pads, bleeding the line every year and trying to clean the piston as best as possible without removing the rear wheel.

Also, banjo bolt is the bleeder bolt correct? I was referring to the other one that holds the brake line to the caliper. (77210591A)

I appreciate the input from everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Yes one piston. "
I think the caliper only has a piston on one side, and as such there is no adjustment. slide pins instead.
Yes one piston. By "slide pins", do you mean the one pin that holds the brake pads?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,955 Posts
No.

The caliper is mounted to the anchor plate with two pins that allow the caliper to move laterally as you apply the brake, or as the pads wear.

Single sided piston calipers are self centering.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top