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So it looks like most of the 2019 guys have figured this out but for the 2017... Seems like the part # has changed. If you look at the the orig brake switch part (53940031D) and look it up it's no longer available and it appears to be replaced by part 53940032D. Has anyone had better luck with this part? I ordered one so I will be able to report when it comes in. Very frustrating situation. Bought the bike used from a Ducati dealer. When I got it home there was enough air in the rear brake line to go SCUBA diving and the rear brake light never worked. You'd think the dealer would take a look at that little detail. Was obvious the first time I sat on the bike that the rear brake needed to be bled. How do you send that bike out in good conscious...
 

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Here’s a little update. I straightened and kept the original switch bracket as a pedal stopper but it bent again on the first decent ride so I welded some steel bracing on it.
I recommend bracing it when you change the switch.
Here’s a pic:
Tire Wheel Land vehicle Bicycle tire Automotive tire
 

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same issue here..I've done the same fixes which did not hold up. I wonder if ducati has fixed this on the 2020 or 2021 models
I have the 2020, can confirm that it's still the same. Found this thread while looking for options as I'm now on my THIRD switch and the bike has only done 1300km... The dealer has tried zipties, new switches etc. Nothing holds this crap in place. I have contacted Ducati but theres been no reply... How someone at Ducati approved this is beyond me... I have now done more miles back and forth to the workshop for warranty errands that i have joyriding...
 

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Is this on 2021s also? Would I need to zip tie at delivery. God damn haha
Don't know... I'm going to 3D print a few spacers and try it out. If i find a good solution and you've got the same problem I could send you one seeing as you're in sweden as well!

I don't want to glue it on permanently since it will probably void any future warranty... But i also don't want to keep going back to the shop every few miles for the same damn thing. I'm running out of options.
 

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I'll check at delivery once I get mine how it's fitted. Hopefully it's fixed.

Would be great if I need something for sure!
 

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I've got the same problem. I've zipped tied mine, and after each off-road ride I need to re-attach the switch. I'll be looking at Kong's solution (Thanks Kong for sharing).
 

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2019 Ducati Scrambler Desert Sled, rear brake switch replacement

This post pools together some notes from everyone who contributed on schematics, parts, wiring, and converting a really poor design to a more reliable hydraulic switch. Thanks, all!

Time: About an hour

Tools:
4mm hex wrench
6mm hex wrench
11mm wrench (not in every metric set. Check yours in case you need to pick one up)
12mm monkey wrench
14mm monkey wrench
Heat gun

Supplies (~$50 USD):
10mm x 1.00 thread hydraulic switch (Amazon.com : TUSK Hydraulic Brake Switch Brembo Brakes : Scoreboards And Timers : Sports & Outdoors)
22-16 AWG (or thereabouts) weatherproof butt connectors
Electrical tape
Shop rags
DOT 4 brake fluid
Brake parts cleaner spray
Rubber tubing for old brake fluid
Plastic bottle to trap old brake fluid
WD-40

Part I: Replace the old plug with a hydraulic switch
  1. Use the 6mm hex wrench to remove rear foot peg assembly. I needed to to this to get access to the the brake cylinder. Based on your tools, you may be able to skip this step.
  2. You may need to put one bolt back in to lift up the exhaust assembly and hold the brake cylinder in the correct position. See photo.
  3. Lay a shop rag over your exhaust in case any brake fluid drips. Brake fluid is corrosive and can damage finishes.
  4. Remove the original cylinder plug and two washers. You can chuck this in the garbage.
  5. Replace the old plug with the banjo switch and 2 washers.
  6. If there were any drips, spray brake parts cleaner on a rag and wipe up.
Part II: wire it up.

The snap connector for the original switch is somewhere under the seat, and, I believe, would require removing parts of the rear assembly, so I took the easy route and just joined the new switch to the old wires with butt connectors.
  1. Snip the three wires on the old switch where they enter the switch casing.
  2. Strip the brown and gray wires. You can safely ignore the blue one.
  3. Test it. Turn the key to On. The brake light should be off. Touch the brown and gray wires together. That should turn your brake light on. If not, you’ll need to inspect the switch for your front brake handle.
  4. Make sure both wires are routed inside the bike’s tube framing.
  5. Connect wires with butt connectors and shrink.
  6. The wire cap on the blue wire in the photo is optional. I added it as a visual reminder to the next person that the blue wire is disconnected on purpose.
  7. Wrap judiciously with electrical tape.
  8. Turn the key to On and test the brake light once more.
  9. Use the 4mm hex wrench to loosen the plastic plate that covers the wiring route.
  10. Shove your electrical tape ball of goodness along with the other wires. Ducati this this is a good place for wires to go. Who am I to argue. See photo.
  11. I zip tied the new wires to adjacent wires. See photo.
Part III: bleed the rear brakes.

There's a chance air entered the brake fluid when the plug was removed. If your brake fluid is good, you just need to bleed out any air bubbles.
  1. Great instructions are at How to Bleed the Brakes on Your Ducati Scrambler - YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com › watch
Part IV: Adjust the rear brake lever travel
  1. Easy way: You could zip tie the old switch back into place. It acts as a stop for the high position for the rear brake lever.
  2. You can get creative here though. I replaced my old switch with a metal bolt of the same height, because it just felt sturdier.
Part V: Put it back together
  1. When screwing into the steel frame, always lubricate, and go slowly. Bolts are harder than the threads in the frame, and it’s easier than you would think to strip threads. If you do strip threads, a metric tap wrench set will set you back another $15 or so on Amazon.
47960
 

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2019 Ducati Scrambler Desert Sled, rear brake switch replacement

This post pools together some notes from everyone who contributed on schematics, parts, wiring, and converting a really poor design to a more reliable hydraulic switch. Thanks, all!

Time: About an hour

Tools:
4mm hex wrench
6mm hex wrench
11mm wrench (not in every metric set. Check yours in case you need to pick one up)
12mm monkey wrench
14mm monkey wrench
Heat gun

Supplies (~$50 USD):
10mm x 1.00 thread hydraulic switch (Amazon.com : TUSK Hydraulic Brake Switch Brembo Brakes : Scoreboards And Timers : Sports & Outdoors)
22-16 AWG (or thereabouts) weatherproof butt connectors
Electrical tape
Shop rags
DOT 4 brake fluid
Brake parts cleaner spray
Rubber tubing for old brake fluid
Plastic bottle to trap old brake fluid
WD-40

Part I: Replace the old plug with a hydraulic switch
  1. Use the 6mm hex wrench to remove rear foot peg assembly. I needed to to this to get access to the the brake cylinder. Based on your tools, you may be able to skip this step.
  2. You may need to put one bolt back in to lift up the exhaust assembly and hold the brake cylinder in the correct position. See photo.
  3. Lay a shop rag over your exhaust in case any brake fluid drips. Brake fluid is corrosive and can damage finishes.
  4. Remove the original cylinder plug and two washers. You can chuck this in the garbage.
  5. Replace the old plug with the banjo switch and 2 washers.
  6. If there were any drips, spray brake parts cleaner on a rag and wipe up.
Part II: wire it up.

The snap connector for the original switch is somewhere under the seat, and, I believe, would require removing parts of the rear assembly, so I took the easy route and just joined the new switch to the old wires with butt connectors.
  1. Snip the three wires on the old switch where they enter the switch casing.
  2. Strip the brown and gray wires. You can safely ignore the blue one.
  3. Test it. Turn the key to On. The brake light should be off. Touch the brown and gray wires together. That should turn your brake light on. If not, you’ll need to inspect the switch for your front brake handle.
  4. Make sure both wires are routed inside the bike’s tube framing.
  5. Connect wires with butt connectors and shrink.
  6. The wire cap on the blue wire in the photo is optional. I added it as a visual reminder to the next person that the blue wire is disconnected on purpose.
  7. Wrap judiciously with electrical tape.
  8. Turn the key to On and test the brake light once more.
  9. Use the 4mm hex wrench to loosen the plastic plate that covers the wiring route.
  10. Shove your electrical tape ball of goodness along with the other wires. Ducati this this is a good place for wires to go. Who am I to argue. See photo.
  11. I zip tied the new wires to adjacent wires. See photo.
Part III: bleed the rear brakes.

There's a chance air entered the brake fluid when the plug was removed. If your brake fluid is good, you just need to bleed out any air bubbles.
  1. Great instructions are at How to Bleed the Brakes on Your Ducati Scrambler - YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com › watch
Part IV: Adjust the rear brake lever travel
  1. Easy way: You could zip tie the old switch back into place. It acts as a stop for the high position for the rear brake lever.
  2. You can get creative here though. I replaced my old switch with a metal bolt of the same height, because it just felt sturdier.
Part V: Put it back together
  1. When screwing into the steel frame, always lubricate, and go slowly. Bolts are harder than the threads in the frame, and it’s easier than you would think to strip threads. If you do strip threads, a metric tap wrench set will set you back another $15 or so on Amazon.
View attachment 47960
Thank you so much for this! I was on my way to my drivers test when I found out mine hade broken off for fourth time in one season... This means I couldn't complete the test and there are no new time slots untill next July... Yet another season ruined by this shit design... Will be doing this your way soon as the dealer where I bought my bike went bankrupt and ducati wont help me with any warranty issues even though the bike is brand new...

Ride safe people!
 
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