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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen some other posts here and there in regard to people just changing the rear shock spring instead of the entire shock and seeing great results. I've done some searching around but don't seem to find any resource or recommendations for the correct spring.

The cost as well is minimal compared to an entire rear shock replacement.

Has anyone done this and can you recommend a resource for the springs? Thanks!!
 

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I've been wondering the same thing, Dave. I guess it will come down to calling a place like Race Tech or Traxxion Dynamics, explain the situation and see what's recommended. Just from a few searches it looks like springs are priced around $100. The project is likely over my head, but if you decide to investigate please let us know what you find.

Sarah
 

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Not sure its worth the hastle changing the spring. I much prefer splashing out and getting a shock that has adjustability for when you need to tighten or loosen the dampening/rebound
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would be tempted to try it before going the whole replacement route. If you can get an acceptable rear suspension from just a spring change why not?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Interesting suggestion but is the rest of the unit not the real workhorse.
From some other posts I've read the original spring isn't a very high quality one and a higher quality progressive spring made a huge difference in the quality of the ride, but I forget where it was I saw the post maybe it was another Ducati Scrambler forum.

I found the post on another forum:

http://www.ducatiscramblerforum.com/forum/wheels-tires-suspension/22281-rear-shock-cured-10-a.html
 

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Ended up going with Mike at Racetech (951-279-6655) as he had the spring on the shelf. Ordered a 7.0" X 2.25" 476 in/lb spring and 4 sizing collars. We'll see how this goes.

Sarah
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ended up going with Mike at Racetech (951-279-6655) as he had the spring on the shelf. Ordered a 7.0" X 2.25" 476 in/lb spring and 4 sizing collars. We'll see how this goes.

Sarah
Sarah, was there a formula you used to order the best in/lb spring? If this works as others have mentioned it will save us a handful of money for us cheapskates like me.
 

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Dave,

They'll do the figuring for you based on your weight and the bike's current sag, and they may make a note of the bike's 5.9 inch rear wheel travel. Measure how much the bike sags when you push it off the sidestand and let it stand straight up on its wheels. Now measure again with you on the bike and feet on the pegs, you'll likely need a helper with that one. They'll ask for both measurements. If you talk with Mike or Dan you might mention me, since I talked their ears off, and make certain to remind them of the Scrambler's tapered spring (which tends to result in poor performance from what I understand) and make sure you get the sizing collars. wak1963 made his, but at $3.00 each there's no need to go thru the hassle. Extra nice folks at both places, don't be afraid to call and talk things over.

By the way, have I mentioned that cutting 1/2 inch off the fork preload spacer worked a miracle for the front end? Absolutely no more jammed elbow joints or teeth slammed together, it is like an entirely different bike up front. If we can help the rear end near that much I'll be tickled.

Sarah
 

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Dave,

They'll do the figuring for you based on your weight and the bike's current sag, and they may make a note of the bike's 5.9 inch rear wheel travel. Measure how much the bike sags when you push it off the sidestand and let it stand straight up on its wheels. Now measure again with you on the bike and feet on the pegs, you'll likely need a helper with that one. They'll ask for both measurements. If you talk with Mike or Dan you might mention me, since I talked their ears off, and make certain to remind them of the Scrambler's tapered spring (which tends to result in poor performance from what I understand) and make sure you get the sizing collars. wak1963 made his, but at $3.00 each there's no need to go thru the hassle. Extra nice folks at both places, don't be afraid to call and talk things over.

By the way, have I mentioned that cutting 1/2 inch off the fork preload spacer worked a miracle for the front end? Absolutely no more jammed elbow joints or teeth slammed together, it is like an entirely different bike up front. If we can help the rear end near that much I'll be tickled.

Sarah
Sara, your front fork fix sounds easy. Can it be done without actually removing the front wheel, fork leg etc. and just remove the handlebar to access the right side fork? If so that would be a really simple mod. Also did you remove any of the fork oil as others had suggested? That would require a bunch more work to get the levels right from the reads on the forums.

I haven't had the time to work on the suspension and your fork and spring mods sound like an inexpensive way to adapt the bike to lighter riders.
 

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Let's wait and see how this goes Dave, it may be a big flop.

Phil,

We left the fork oil alone entirely, (it looked pristine) and just trimmed the spacer. Take a look at the online manual:

http://www.scramblerforum.com/threads/ducati-2015-ducati-scrambler-800-full-manual-pdf.3239/

Page 437 starts the fork overhaul, and 439 will show a picture of the locking nut and spacer. You'll need the weight off the front end, and be aware it'll require some pressure to push the spring down in order to access the nut, but if you secure the bike well I can't think why you'd have to remove the fork leg entirely. We did, since we didn't know exactly what we were getting into. But you look at the manual and think things thru before you start, just in case I've overlooked something or another. A great big thank you to cycletime for this mod, here's the original thread:

http://www.ducatiscramblerforum.com/forum/introductions/27353-front-suspension.html

Sarah
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sarah, I meant to ask earlier, when you measure the sag do you measure just the spring compressing or is it another measurement. I would imagine you measure the length of the spring under the different situations? Thanks!!
 

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Let's wait and see how this goes Dave, it may be a big flop.

Phil,

We left the fork oil alone entirely, (it looked pristine) and just trimmed the spacer. Take a look at the online manual:

DUCATI 2015 Ducati Scrambler 800 Full Manual PDF

Page 437 starts the fork overhaul, and 439 will show a picture of the locking nut and spacer. You'll need the weight off the front end, and be aware it'll require some pressure to push the spring down in order to access the nut, but if you secure the bike well I can't think why you'd have to remove the fork leg entirely. We did, since we didn't know exactly what we were getting into. But you look at the manual and think things thru before you start, just in case I've overlooked something or another. A great big thank you to cycletime for this mod, here's the original thread:

http://www.scramblerforum.com/forum/introductions/27353-front-suspension.html

Sarah

Sarah

Yeah, I checked those and didn't see a need to remove the fork but just wanted ask someone who had done it. Probably do this before my summer road trip.

Thanks for sharing all your info. Seems we approach this bike from a similar angle. Make solid improvement s without breaking the bank

Have fun

Phil
 

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Sarah

Yeah, I checked those and didn't see a need to remove the fork but just wanted ask someone who had done it. Probably do this before my summer road trip.

Thanks for sharing all your info. Seems we approach this bike from a similar angle. Make solid improvement s without breaking the bank

Have fun

Phil
Hello All
Am following this thread with great interest as I too find the bike’s suspension a little harsh at least for my style of riding and not about to fork out 600 smacks for an aftermarket shock and spring combo.

Tied into the front fork spacer modification recommended on this page. Piece of cake. fyi I was not able to complete the operation without taking off the tire/wheel assembly. No big deal so long as one has a socket large enough to handle the axle nut. The axle is pulled/pushed out from the right hand side and the wheel which by the way is not at all heavy, drops right off. These are a few of my observations for anyone wishing to tackle this on their own.

1. While it is not necessary or helpful to remove the handlebars, was happy I did because reassembled them in a slightly more upright position allowed the clutch and brake levers to be rotated to more accessible positions as well. No doubt is a matter of personnel preference but I like my palms a little more behind the grip rather than on top and then reaching down for the levers.

2. I used a floor jack and a block of wood under the front cylinder to lift the front wheel an inch or so off the floor. Bike balanced on jack and side stand and rear wheel. No doubt there are more prudent ways to accomplish this operation. Probably a good idea to loosen everything, top cap, fork tube clamps, axle nut, etc. before dropping the wheel. Proceed with caution.

3. Might as well drop the wheel now as described above. Fully loosen the axle clamps, remove the axle nut and tap/pull the axle out while supporting the wheel assembly with your free hand. Mind the 20mm or so spacer which will also fall off the axle shaft. Don’t squeeze the brake lever from this point or you'll be sorry.

4. Next remove the 2 right hand screws for the mud guard and remove the fork tube twisting and pulling downward.

5. Hold the fork tube upright on a suitable surface. Use a clean rag to grip the nylon preload spacer and pull down enough to expose the retaining nut and put a 14mm open end spanner on the nut. Use a second spanner/socket to remove the top cap.

6. I used a plumbers tubing cutter to trim the top end of the spacer about 3/4 inch. A fine tooth saw will work as well so long as a nice square cut is achieved.

7. At this point is just a matter of reassembling things in reverse order. I found it was necessary to firmly grasp the threaded rod and pull so it be fully extended out of the tube before fitting the spacer and top cap. Again use a shop towel. Reinsert the fork tube and then install the wheel. Aligning the brake rotor back between the pads was a little tricky but no big deal. DOUBLE and TRIPLE check all fasteners are properly tightened. Imagine the front wheel coming off the bike at 75mph while doing this. My own technique, go to the factory markings and a smidgen more.

Made no effort to measure the sag but the Scrambler looks to have the same cocky stance as before. Have not yet had opportunity for a test run.
 

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Hello All
Am following this thread with great interest as I too find the bike’s suspension a little harsh at least for my style of riding and not about to fork out 600 smacks for an aftermarket shock and spring combo.

Tied into the front fork spacer modification recommended on this page. Piece of cake. fyi I was not able to complete the operation without taking off the tire/wheel assembly. No big deal so long as one has a socket large enough to handle the axle nut. The axle is pulled/pushed out from the right hand side and the wheel which by the way is not at all heavy, drops right off. These are a few of my observations for anyone wishing to tackle this on their own.

1. While it is not necessary or helpful to remove the handlebars, was happy I did because reassembled them in a slightly more upright position allowed the clutch and brake levers to be rotated to more accessible positions as well. No doubt is a matter of personnel preference but I like my palms a little more behind the grip rather than on top and then reaching down for the levers.

2. I used a floor jack and a block of wood under the front cylinder to lift the front wheel an inch or so off the floor. Bike balanced on jack and side stand and rear wheel. No doubt there are more prudent ways to accomplish this operation. Probably a good idea to loosen everything, top cap, fork tube clamps, axle nut, etc. before dropping the wheel. Proceed with caution.

3. Might as well drop the wheel now as described above. Fully loosen the axle clamps, remove the axle nut and tap/pull the axle out while supporting the wheel assembly with your free hand. Don't squeeze the brake lever at this point or you'll be sorry.

4. Next remove the 2 right hand screws for the mud guard and remove the fork tube twisting and pulling downward.

5. Hold the fork tube upright on a suitable surface. Use a clean rag to grip the nylon preload spacer and pull down enough to expose the retaining nut and put a 14mm open end spanner on the nut. Use a second spanner/socket to remove the top cap.

6. I used a plumbers tubing cutter to trim the top end of the spacer about 3/4 inch. A fine tooth saw will work as well so long as a nice square cut is achieved.

7. At this point is just a matter of reassembling things in reverse order. I found it was necessary to firmly grasp the threaded rod and pull so it be fully extended out of the tube before fitting the spacer and top cap. Again use a shop towel. Reinsert the fork tube and then install the wheel. Aligning the brake rotor back between the pads was a little tricky but no big deal. DOUBLE and TRIPLE check all fasteners are properly tightened. Imagine the front wheel coming off the bike at 75mph while doing this. My own technique, go to the factory markings and a smidgen more.

Made no effort to measure the sag but the Scrambler looks to have the same cocky stance as before. Have not yet had opportunity for a test run.
Thanks for the writeup. Just to double check that you remove the fork cap at the start of step 5 and whether there is any spring pressure on the cap?


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Thanks for the writeup. Just to double check that you remove the fork cap at the start of step 5 and whether there is any spring pressure on the cap?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thanks for the writeup. Just to double check that you remove the fork cap at the start of step 5 and whether there is any spring pressure on the cap?


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To clarify, the top cap is threaded into the fork tube and best to loosen it while is still on the bike. Ducati recommends putting a strip of electrical tape over the hex before putting a wrench on it to avoid marring the chrome finish. The cap should only be screwed entirely free of the tube after the front end of the bike is raised or fork tube is totally free of the bike. Spring pressure is minimal when not supporting the bike. I made a point to not use a bench vice to avoid any chance of squishing the fork tube into something less than perfect roundness.
 

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Excellent detail DouglasLee, thank you! I hope you'll soon have a chance to ride and let us know how it worked for you.

Dave-- measure the distance from a suspended point, such as the edge of the rear fender, down to a grounded point, such as the axle bolt, or the ground if it's handier for you. Take the measurement with the bike on the kickstand, then with the bike straight up on it's wheels, and finally with you on the bike, straight up on it's wheels and your feet on the pegs. Doug held the bike for me while he measured, but you could position your bike next to the workbench and use a hand to balance yourself while your helper does the measuring.

Sarah
 
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