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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Whelp, here we go. One of the most highly contested subjects in motorcycling is now coming to the Scrambler world.

What break-in method are you going to use for the Scrambler Scout?

When I have bought new bikes the dealer is told me to go by the manual. The manual will likely say something like do not go above 1/3 throttle for the first 90 miles while you vary engine speed and load. Then from 91-300, you are not go go above 1/2 throttle and again vary engine speed frequently. After that, you are able to ride for the next 200 miles (301-500) without operating above 3/4 throttle. After you take your new bike in for the 500 mile service, you will be free to rev the motor freely.

Others subscribe to the Motoman break-in method. It is also known as the "rough break-in." This method basically states that you should ride the thing like you stole it to properly seat the rings. It is claimed that you can actually seat the rings much faster than the 500 mile interval and actually mitigate any sort of power loss that might occur from improper sealing of the rings and decrease blow by. This method can be found here: Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power

How are you going to break in your motor?
 

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I have read the motorman break-in, sounds feasable what he is saying and I may give it a go. What does anyone else think?
 

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For the previous ST4s the running in instructions were;
Up to 1000 km
During the first 1000 km, keep an eye on the rev counter. It should never exceed 6000 rpm.
During the first hours of riding, it is advisable to run the engine at varying load and rpm, though still within
recommended limit.
To this end, roads with plenty of bends and even slightly hilly areas are ideal for a most efficient running-in of
engine, brakes and suspensions.
From 1000 to 2500 km
At this point, you can squeeze some more power out of

your engine. However never exceed 7500 rpm.
And for my MTS1200;
Up to 1000 km
During the first 1000 km, keep an eye on the rev counter. It should never exceed: 5500÷6000 rpm.
During the first hours of riding, it is advisable to run the engine at varying load and rpm, though still within
recommended limit.
To this end, roads with plenty of bends and even slightly hilly areas are ideal for a most efficient running-in of engine,
brakes and suspension.
From 1000 to 2500 km
At this point, you can squeeze some more power out of your
engine. However never exceed:
7000 rpm.

Not too bad, although I like the Motorman way of thinking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was breaking in my Scout in the Motoman (a little tweaked, but only a little) and it actually felt a little stronger than the pre-production Scout that I got to ride for about 2 months.
 

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If an engine is nursed too much when new the bore will glaze over and will forever burn oil. The only way around this is to strip the barrels and hone the bore. Also if an engine is not 'run in' by the time the first oil change takes place then the engine will not 'run in' anymore afterwards. This is due to the new oils will just not allow it to happen. (too slippy)

Don't ring it's neck when cold and don't let it heat up on tick-over either, start it up and ride away and allow it to heat up on the move. When excess fuel migrates past the rings on tick-over it dilutes the oil and effectively washes the oil off the crank journals.

Bear in mind, nursing it because you think your being kind is pointless, I've been to the Ducati factory in Bologna and can assure you that every bike that comes off the line is put on a dyno and reved out in all the gears as a shake down.
You are not the first person to ride your bike regardless of what you think.
 

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I agree with Hui, Just be sensible about it though, the first oil in the bike is for running in purposes and you should abide by the rules in the handbook, (or as close as possible :rolleyes:)

Actually when I had my 796 , I was so excited I never even thought about running in procedure, Collected it on Friday and took it back on monday for the first service, Did all the miles in the mountains and hills around North Wales, :)
 

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I have read the motorman break-in, sounds feasable what he is saying and I may give it a go. What does anyone else think?
I've done that with all my other new bikes. Never had a problem :)
 

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I've really only stood by one principle on break in: Don't ride at steady throttle for the first 500 miles or so. When I picked up my current bike, I loaded it in the truck and hauled it home instead of making the hour long interstate drone it's first ride. I also think that occasional blasts of full throttle, and the increased cylinder pressures that result, do help seat the rings better. But I never kept it there, and I let it cool some afterwards by riding easier. So I got home, unloaded, and went on a backroad adventure for 100 miles :D. The bike now has 40k miles and hasn't so much as needed a valve adjustment yet!
 

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I've really only stood by one principle on break in: Don't ride at steady throttle for the first 500 miles or so. When I picked up my current bike, I loaded it in the truck and hauled it home instead of making the hour long interstate drone it's first ride. I also think that occasional blasts of full throttle, and the increased cylinder pressures that result, do help seat the rings better. But I never kept it there, and I let it cool some afterwards by riding easier. So I got home, unloaded, and went on a backroad adventure for 100 miles :D. The bike now has 40k miles and hasn't so much as needed a valve adjustment yet!
Exactly, the trick is to just drive it normally without ragging the arse out of it.
Manufactures have to offer some sort of advice and when we analyse their instructions it's not far off the norm. They also need to make sure the bike makes it through the warranty period without costing them too much.
The other misconception is we need to ride/drive a certain way to keep our warranty, the way we break in our bike is up to the individual and has no bearing on warranty status, unless of course you're stupid enough to put in writing that you deliberately set out to break the machine.

Just to add a point, everyone has an opinion about running in but rarely do we read why.
The metal parts are full of peaks and troughs (under a micro scope), the objective is to gently wear away the sharp peaks leaving the troughs to hold oil to lubricate. The two surfaces then have a really good seal with the added shallow trough for the oil to hide
If we rag a cold engine the peaks tend to break off below the desired point which leaves even more sharp broken points and a larger trough, therefor burning much more oil. It also makes it impossible for the surfaces to mate together and make seal.
Hard revving causes similar problems as the cold engine, this is due to much greater pressures and heat within and the peaks find it easier to overheat, harden and break off.
Once the surfaces are worn enough to create a good seal then knock the shit out of it. This keeps carbon build up to a minimum and let's it know who's boss.
 

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Out of all the bikes I've owned over the years I have always just rode them like I would on any other normal day. When I specifically asked a local dealer that I bought my new 2009 Concours 14 from about break in he pretty said just ride it like it's broken in. He told me when he purchased a new Hyabusa that he rode it like he stole it from day one and it runs perfect to this day.
 

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Picked her up from the dealership on Saturday and decided to try the Motoman break in method - probably due to my lack of patience more than anything! After a few km's of warming I let the bike chill out for five then decided to open her up only to be promptly told off by the ECU. It seems these bikes have a reduced rev limit for a period of time/km's. I wonder if this switches off automatically or if it's controlled by the dealer at service?
 

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Oh right, didn't know that Jerry, :rolleyes: had my first service done yesterday at 747 miles, I could tell the difference ;)
What ya reckon, gears a wee bit slicker or just overall better/different ?.
Did they mention about over mileage ?
I mentioned in another post regarding what we call 1st service that the ECU gets updated if needed. I know KTM do as my rev limiter/gearshift lamp was re-set to much higher in the range after the service.

Just goes to show that people who don't follow the schedule don't have the bike at it's best. Although, I do think service schedules are a bit OTT with certain things just to keep the workshop busy.
 

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Hui, I did say to them I don't really have any problems with the bike, But perhaps a little snatchy before its warmed up, after that it's great, I won't know if that's changed until my next first start up,
I really can't put my finger on it, but it did feel smoother and quieter some how, and a lot faster now :cool: could do with another gear at times, I keep trying for 7 th, :rolleyes:
 

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I've only ridden mine back home from the dealer on Wednesday and I did about 50 miles. I rode it rather briskly home ;)
 

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I have always followed the rough break-in method, and always experienced excellent longevity and performance from my bikes..
 
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