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Normally, I try to condense the message and then provide a link so you can read more, but this one needs to be read, in it's entirety.


Ducati’s Scrambler Sixty2 Will Give You Butterflies, But Its Hipster Marketing May Make You Puke

Nicolas Stecher
The Drive
April 27, 2016

According to whichever New York marketing agency Ducati hired to launch its Scrambler brand, if you are considering said motorcycle it follows that you are a young man of exacting taste. You spend weekends riding across sweeping Baja dunes, gritting your teeth against the sand, while by night you sip craft bourbon at a crackling campfire as a voluptuous female silhouette bends over in the distance.

You favor buffalo plaid, fulsome facial hair experiments, and meticulously frayed designer jeans. Your eclectic—but well-considered!—tattoo collection would certainly be endorsed as a "DO" by VICE magazine. Your life, in other words, is one long Steve McQueen reverie as seen through vintage-inspired Warby Parker goggles; you have achieved Silver Lake Nirvana.

But here's the thing: despite the image Ducati desperately wants to sell you, a motorcycle is not some sort of antidote for disintegrating self-identity, or a panacea for the doldrums of cubicle living. A motorcycle is a machine—one of the purest, most utilitarian machines left on the modern market, second only to a chainsaw, or maybe a nail gun.

Sure, all marketing is based on the appropriation of identity, but Ducati doesn’t have to lean so heavily on those wispy illusions when promoting their new Scrambler Sixty2. Especially because the Sixty2 happens to be so damn good.

Ducati’s Scrambler, which they debuted not just as a motorcycle but as a standalone sub-brand last year, was constructed with the focused goal of adding an entirely new demographic to their sales. Ducati is mostly known for exceptional Italian-built steeds of pure speed and mouthwatering design; its halo Panigale superbike is a 200-mph, petrol-fueled sculpture, with the sort of Bologna-bred beauty that makes grown men teary-eyed and weak in the knees. But the company needed a motorcycle that could usher in a new age of Ducatisti, a bike that riders just getting into the two-wheeled lifestyle could embrace without fear of squandering their mortgage. By all measures, and as one of the most highly-lauded motorcycles of 2015, the Scrambler Icon achieved this very goal.

The rest here: Ducati’s Scrambler Sixty2 Will Give You Butterflies, But Its Hipster Marketing May Make You Puke

Seriously, go read it.
 

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Man, I love my scrambler--More than I even thought I would. Still, the marketing makes me sick. I don't own any skinny jeans and am just as content with folgers coffee as I am with some free trade organic artisan roast. I do, however, enjoy street food. Hmm...
 

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Perhaps the disastrous customer non service that Ducati provides in the USA is also designed around this new demographic they have aimed the Scrambler at. Never in my nearly 62 (cute coincidence, huh? Ducati 62 and my age) years have I experienced such poor interest in keeping customers happy or at least not totally annoyed with them. Just read my posts concerning my experiences at the hands of Ducati and DNA. Hopefully you'll read about them before you plunk down your hard earned $. Should Ducati and DNA exonerate themselves I'll be certain to share that, but at this time I would expect it would be more likely that Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny together will come visit my home for supper tonight.
 

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I've been riding "scrambler" type bikes since I bought a new Triumph Trophy 500 in 1970 (see my pic). So I'm definitely neither hipster nor new rider. For the last 10 years I've put 52,000 miles on a Suzi DR 650. So I was intrigued by the Ducatis. I got around to checking them out in late April and the dealer had a Sixty2 demo bike. I rode it and was unimpressed (to say the least) by the motor. It felt feeble compared to my old DR even though they make almost the same peak HP. The ergos and handling felt GREAT though .. not as tall as the DR and considerably less top heavy. So I ordered an Icon. The 803 motor is GREAT for an experienced 70 year old rider! The Icon is my favorite new bike since the Trophy 500!

I don't really see the point of the Sixty2 in the USA. (In other countries that have age / experience restrictions on engine size it does make sense)
 

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I'm still not interested in street food - guess I'm not that adventurous.
 

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Just to clarify, this wasn't intended as a review. The Drive did a separate review of the Scrambler; this was meant as an op-ed specifically aimed at the (ill-advised) marketing efforts of the Scrambler in general, the SixtyTwo specifically. I love street food like no other, but I don't think it has any place in trying to sell you a motorcycle. I think the ultra-hipster focus may actually do a disservice to potential Ducati Scrambler buyers.
 

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I wasn't responding to your post / non-review. If the Sixty2 weighed 350 or less wet and cost < $7000 list, I would have bought it instead of the Icon... But it's clear that the "cost to build" diff between the Sixty-two and the Icon is almost as negligible as the wet weight diff Basically the only diff is the "upside down" fork on the 803. So I understand Ducatis marketing strategy in the US. Hopefully one day they will build a "real" Sixty2 that weighed 350 or less around a counter balanced 450 or 500 cc single.. I'd buy that one even if I had to pay $9000!
 
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