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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I just purchased my first Ducati and would like some help on how to adjust for my height and weight. I’m 6’2” 270. I’ve read the manual and watched a few videos but nothing that works for my size. Any suggestions? Thanks!
 

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Max preload front. Rear about 20mm of exposed thread above the preload adjustment nuts. Then I would try 1 click less rebound on the rear from stock and 1 turn less rebound on the front and maybe 1 turn more on the compression side.
Just start with upping the preloads and experiment with the rebound and compression. I'm 6 feet and about 280 all geared up and I think the suspension is fine(for road use).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Max preload front. Rear about 20mm of exposed thread above the preload adjustment nuts. Then I would try 1 click less rebound on the rear from stock and 1 turn less rebound on the front and maybe 1 turn more on the compression side.
Just start with upping the preloads and experiment with the rebound and compression. I'm 6 feet and about 280 all geared up and I think the suspension is fine(for road use).
Thank you sir! I’ll give it a shot and let you know how it goes.
 

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Thank you sir! I’ll give it a shot and let you know how it goes.
You're welcome, I hope it gets you where you wanna be. The stock suspension is pretty good so I'm sure you will be able to dial it in. Just take your time and once you've set the preloads don't make to many changes at once. Also check if the compression and rebound settings are set to the base setting discribed in the owners manual. My owners manual had a little error though, saying clicks where it had to say turns but it will explain itself when you work on it.
Please keep us posted and good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You're welcome, I hope it gets you where you wanna be. The stock suspension is pretty good so I'm sure you will be able to dial it in. Just take your time and once you've set the preloads don't make to many changes at once. Also check if the compression and rebound settings are set to the base setting discribed in the owners manual. My owners manual had a little error though, saying clicks where it had to say turns but it will explain itself when you work on it.
Please keep us posted and good luck.
How do I verify if it is set to what my manual says? Sorry, I’m new to this...
 

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How do I verify if it is set to what my manual says? Sorry, I’m new to this...
Basicly this is all explained in your manual but if you look in this thread on the bottem of page 2 a very detailed discription is given and you will have no problem working it out. If it still isn't completely clear let us know.
 

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^^ +1 yes that thread really details which way to turn and # of turns/clicks.

The people on this forum have been a great help in clarifying this and other questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
The guys at the Ducati dealership adjusted the front and back as tight as they could get it. They say it’s “maxed out” and if I need it to be stiffer I would need to upgrade my shocks. It feels better, but I’m sure there is more that could be done.
 

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The guys at the Ducati dealership adjusted the front and back as tight as they could get it. They say it’s “maxed out” and if I need it to be stiffer I would need to upgrade my shocks. It feels better, but I’m sure there is more that could be done.
You could have stiffer springs installed but I can't imagine that this would be nescesary. I don't know what your after. Rear preload maxed out seams excessive for solo riding.
 

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I'm surprised by all this advice to stiffen up the suspension on the Scrambler 1100.

I set mine to standard settings as per the handbook and discovered there was very little static sag at the back and the front was topping out.

I weigh 210lb.

So I backed off the preload about one-and-a-half turns on the rear shock and took one turn of preload off the front. The front was still a little skittish so I've taken another quarter turn off the preload and reduced compression damping by about half a turn. This last change has transformed the bike. I'm amazed how much difference such a small adjustment made.

The bike now feels 'suspended', which is what 'suspension' is supposed to do. It's still stable in corners and still doesn't bottom out under heavy braking.

Please don't just dial in my settings, even if you are the same size as me. Our riding styles might be completely different, and our tastes in bike 'feel' might be poles apart. But the lesson for me was how much difference that last quarter-turn made.

Read up on suspension theory to understand the differences made by adjustments. Invest in a quality c-spanner to adjust the rear preload and go out and play. Experiment with tyre pressures, too. I've stuck with the handbook for these for now but you need to take into account atmospheric conditions, road types and riding speed. Five pounds per square inch either side of recommended can make a big difference.

I've only had my Scrambler 1100 for a couple of months but riding it is already a very different experience to the one it gave me on the test ride - and that was bloody good!
 

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I'm surprised by all this advice to stiffen up the suspension on the Scrambler 1100.

I set mine to standard settings as per the handbook and discovered there was very little static sag at the back and the front was topping out.

I weigh 210lb.

So I backed off the preload about one-and-a-half turns on the rear shock and took one turn of preload off the front. The front was still a little skittish so I've taken another quarter turn off the preload and reduced compression damping by about half a turn. This last change has transformed the bike. I'm amazed how much difference such a small adjustment made.

The bike now feels 'suspended', which is what 'suspension' is supposed to do. It's still stable in corners and still doesn't bottom out under heavy braking.

Please don't just dial in my settings, even if you are the same size as me. Our riding styles might be completely different, and our tastes in bike 'feel' might be poles apart. But the lesson for me was how much difference that last quarter-turn made.

Read up on suspension theory to understand the differences made by adjustments. Invest in a quality c-spanner to adjust the rear preload and go out and play. Experiment with tyre pressures, too. I've stuck with the handbook for these for now but you need to take into account atmospheric conditions, road types and riding speed. Five pounds per square inch either side of recommended can make a big difference.

I've only had my Scrambler 1100 for a couple of months but riding it is already a very different experience to the one it gave me on the test ride - and that was bloody good!
If you like it it's fine but at 210 extra preload looks the way to go as most stock settings are aimed at a 170-180lbs. Also increasing preload doesn't make the suspension stiffer only a stiffer spring can. But as the Scrambler has a progressive rear spring it is a bit less straoggt forward.
I have max preload minus a half turn in front and 21mm of thread showing in the rear and the bike is hella comfy and way faster steering then the stock set up. But I'm about 280 lbs.(127kg) geared up so that's quite a big difference.
 

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By stroke you mean the length of the exposed chromed section of the shock?
Here is a nice article on how it is done: Suspension Tech: How To Set Rider Sag | MC GARAGE.

I had my SS done at a Total Control track day and it took 2 people and a chock. Or... Find a suspension shop fairly close by to help. It usually is pretty cheap, like under $100. Even Dave Moss charges under $100 at his clinics. I need to get mine in.
 
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