Ducati Scrambler Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've thought for a while that I might start a thread to update with occasional tidbits from my rides that I find interesting. Life keeps me mostly close to home these days, but I'm fortunate to live in an area with a lot of beautiful things to see and interesting history. I'm a big fan of the band Rush, and their drummer Neil Peart is both a great musician and a serious, serious motorcycle rider and author. In an essay he wrote a while back, he discussed what he called "shunpiking" or the idea that the best way to get from place to place is to not take the highway (the word comes from alternate routes that would spring up so people could bypass tolls). I realized that I've been doing that for years, and it's a great way to get around.

Today I did about 70 - 80 miles all down mostly one lane and or dirt roads in the Baltimore and Harford County areas of Maryland.

I love to get out on little farm-to-market roads that no one uses except the people who live there. I stopped for a rest today under a Locust tree on the border of somebody's field.

IMG_1131.jpg


Not having any idea where I was, I took out my phone to fire up a maps app, and realized I'd happened upon a kind of cool thing.

IMG_1137.jpg


This road is called Mason-Dixon road, named after the Mason-Dixon line, which is the border between Maryland and Pennsylvania. In this picture, to the left of the road (where my bike is) is part of Maryland, but to the right of the road is Pennsylvania. The Mason-Dixon line is named after Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, who did the initial surveys of the area in 1763 - 1767 to resolve a border dispute between the colonies. (King Charles II had used an inaccurate map when granting land to William Penn, and the Calvert family - specifically Lord Baltimore - to whom he had already granted Maryland, weren't happy about it.) I worked as a land surveyor one summer in college, and I have an immense respect for what it took for these two men and their team to accurately survey a line through 250-odd miles of untouched wilderness with theodolites and plumb bobs.

Charles Mason was the son of a baker who became an astronomer and was part of the Royal Society He had worked at the Royal Greenwich Observatory, and there is a crater on the moon named after him today. Jeremiah Dixon was a surveyor from County Durham who had a wealthy father and a mother from Newcastle who married well.

Anyhow, I digress. History is cool.

On the way home, I did some dirt, and came across a fun place to snap a pic:
IMG_1139.jpg

I call this one "A Scrambler In Its Natural Environment." (No, I didn't go down the private road. It leads to a Park Ranger's residence.)

It was a beautiful day of riding after weeks of rain. I need more days like this!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,530 Posts
Amen to that, and thanks for the pictures. Nice bike you have there.

Sarah
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top