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One of the guys on multistrada. Net bought a retro GT when they came out. I commented that I liked the bike and the look of the spoked wheels. I was surprised when he said the wheels were very heavy and he'd had to alter his suspension. Just suggesting a check of weight of these wheels.
 

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The wire spoke wheels look great but I'm pretty sure the wire spoke wheels are significantly heavier than the cast wheels. Anyone seen any weights listed for the wheels? All the Ducati specs I've seen have been marketing documents without much detailed info.
 

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The wire spoke wheels look great but I'm pretty sure the wire spoke wheels are significantly heavier than the cast wheels. Anyone seen any weights listed for the wheels? All the Ducati specs I've seen have been marketing documents without much detailed info.
The Icon and Full Throttle come in at 170kg dry weight but the Urban Enduro is 176kg and the Classic 176.5kg. There are some detail differences between the models which might account for some of this weight but it looks like the wire wheels must weight about 5 - 6kg more than the cast ones.
 

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The Icon and Full Throttle come in at 170kg dry weight but the Urban Enduro is 176kg and the Classic 176.5kg. There are some detail differences between the models which might account for some of this weight but it looks like the wire wheels must weight about 5 - 6kg more than the cast ones.
Derek,
Thank you. That difference is about what I was guessing. All the spec sheets I've found here in the US show all four models as weighing 170kg. I really like the wire wheels but I'm not sure I like them enough to pay the weight penalty, especially on the wheels where it counts more.
 

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The wire wheels was one of the features that attracted me to the Classic that I'm buying. With the sort of riding I'll be doing the weight of the wheels isn't going to bother me. It's not a sports bike and I won't expect it to perform nor handle like one. Of more concern are that they will be fitted with inner tubes.
 
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A couple of pounds of rotational mass can have huge effects on your butt dyno. Think about the pulleys on your car's motor. Performance guys drop as much weight on those things as they can and they are only losing ounces, but because rotational mass, they get much quicker rev speeds.
 

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A couple of pounds of rotational mass can have huge effects on your butt dyno. Think about the pulleys on your car's motor. Performance guys drop as much weight on those things as they can and they are only losing ounces, but because rotational mass, they get much quicker rev speeds.
Your not wrong but I wont be worrying about carbon wheels. I will be grinning ear to ear thinking where to go for a ride next and wont be doing warp speeds
 

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Oh yeah, I don't think that carbon wheels will be necessary at all. This isn't going to be a top speed guy at all, so that kind of savings will not be necessary.

Pay close attention to the wheel sizes too. The Bonneville line offers spokes and cast wheels as well. For the cast wheel size, you are limited quite a bit on replacement tires. There are a lot more tires available for the spoke wheel size.
 

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So much so that I have moved all of the posts into their own thread so that we don't get Off Topic.

I think that the wheel choice is going to be a deal maker or breaker for some folks. I love the look of wires, but they are high maintenance for sure.
 

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Well, I had a Classic on order but am changing it to an Icon. I love the look of the wire wheels (and I'm not particularly fussed about the weight difference), but the tubed tyres are a problem for me. I like my bikes to do everything, which means I'll be taking the Scrambler touring - and having a puncture on a tubed tyre in the middle of the Pyrenees will not be fun.

My thinking is that I can easily get all the extras to turn an Icon into a Classic, but swapping the wheels to do the reverse will probably be more of a pain. But all input input to the contrary always appreciated.


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My other bikes include a '66 Bonneville, a Cagiva Elefant, plus a little Yamaha XT225, all with wire wheels. These bikes are not low mileage and I've had zero maintenance issues with the wheels. Barring direct impacts with boulders and trees, once properly adjusted they stay adjusted for a long time and maintenance is just not an issue. Repairing flats has not been a real problem since they so rarely occur.

My only concern is the additional weight. Also, one of the attractions of the Scrambler is the relatively light weight and I wonder how accurate the initial claimed weights are and if they will turn out to be much higher.

It's going to be a fun bike to ride no matter what it weighs.
 

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If the extra weight (if any) is all at the rim then maybe worth a mention, I suspect any weight difference is at the hub which may affect the un-sprung weight but not that the average rider would notice.
If we are going to get al techy about rotational forces, un-sprung weight, rolling mass, gyroscopic effect etc. then we need to ditch the big chunky tyres for a start. That's where the foreseen problem would lie if any.
Just remember a few years ago the big players changed to 16" rims for better directional changes, they weren't long changing their minds back to 17" as the bikes became too twitchy and unstable.
I say be carefully what you wish for, as you get nowt for nowt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It's great to discuss all the pros and cons things crop up we might not have thought of eg I never thought abt punctures and the tubed tyre, good point
 

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Derek,
Thank you. That difference is about what I was guessing. All the spec sheets I've found here in the US show all four models as weighing 170kg. I really like the wire wheels but I'm not sure I like them enough to pay the weight penalty, especially on the wheels where it counts more.
Seriously? 6kg? Just eat less pies.
 

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Seriously? 6kg? Just eat less pies.
I mean, I am right there with you, that isn't much weight, but when you are talking rotating mass, that can be kind of a lot.

If you are really worried about weight, you should ride naked. (Please skip ahead in the video to :51)


If you have not seen this, it is worth the 9:52
 

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:)The nice thing about spoke wheels is if you ride off road you can bend them and still get home on a square wheel. Repair is easier too. There is a reason dirt bikes don't run cast wheels. The tube tubeless debate is another story both can be repaired on the road. I read somewhere there is a product you can use on your rim to run tubeless tires on a wire wheel . you may want to check it out. But If you are that concerned about a few pounds on a scrambler maybe your should buy something else or go to the gym.
 
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