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Hello again pepe`s,
I got carried away in my last `letter` .
While changing the sprocket on my ICON to which I adopted a thoroughly methodical fool proof attitude ( or thought so ).
I tie wrapped the front brake ON , I selected all required spanners , cloths ,wipes ,stands ,jacks ,wooden blocks .
I at first checked I had bought ANND had been sent the correct part . YES . CARRY ON .
I loosened the sprocket nuts FIRST.
I placed sponge pads to my bike paddock stand , lifted the bike AND AARGH .
THE BIKE SLID down THE PADDOCK STAND , this I found was due to the swing arms having a large angle ,and gravity takes over ,the bike did NOT fall but I HAVE scarred the finished coating to the swinging arm ( B--T--D) .
T he bonus of this mechanical foray is that the wheel does NOT have to be TOTALY removed , merely moved to create space to slot in and out the sprocket .
What are peoples opines of hollow links over split links .
rangerover .
 

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Split links are reserved for low power bikes, my thought would be up to 250 or so. Hollow or soft links for everything else and definitely the Scrambler with pulsating torque. The down side is you need a chain riveting tool to put it on properly.
 

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I put a 42t rear sprocket on and had to remove a few links. Used a split link which is actually handy. Easier to take off the wheel for tire replacement or cleaning as you can leave the axle adjustment in place. I did find it somewhat deformed (just perceptibly) but I think this is more due to the rather tight chain sag spec than the power. I keep meaning to loosen it up a bit.

And they don't all fit the same. I bought 3x different ones to have a couple of spares and one of the versions had too short pins.

I checked the web for comments on split links and passionate opinions exist on both sides. Seems it is either just fine or a complete mistake but nothing in the middle. Your choice.
 

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I put a 42t rear sprocket on and had to remove a few links. Used a split link which is actually handy. Easier to take off the wheel for tire replacement or cleaning as you can leave the axle adjustment in place. I did find it somewhat deformed (just perceptibly) but I think this is more due to the rather tight chain sag spec than the power. I keep meaning to loosen it up a bit.

And they don't all fit the same. I bought 3x different ones to have a couple of spares and one of the versions had too short pins.

I checked the web for comments on split links and passionate opinions exist on both sides. Seems it is either just fine or a complete mistake but nothing in the middle. Your choice.
Any chain, whether it's a human chain or a bike chain is as strong as it's weakest link.
You don't need to touch the tension adjusters to remove the wheel. Remove the axle and the wheel can roll forward allowing the chain to be removed from the sprocket.and hang over the swingarm end.
It's up to you but my thoughts are;
  • If you have to buy three links to find the correct one.
  • You think avoiding the tensioners is a bonus.
  • Blame a chain that's too tight for stretching a link and you keep meaning to loosen it up 'a bit'
  • Don't realise the gearbox output bearing is being tortured.
You should have a professional look after your bike.
 

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So asked my mechanic.Specs for Scrambler say rivet link and X Ring chain.So I guess no insurance claim if breaks and wrong chain ?Does seem pretty heavy duty chain tho and good for a R1 apparently
 

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So asked my mechanic.Specs for Scrambler say rivet link and X Ring chain.So I guess no insurance claim if breaks and wrong chain ?Does seem pretty heavy duty chain tho and good for a R1 apparently
Yes, good for an R1. The chain strength is more to do with quality than size, big power racers often use a smaller/lighter chain like a 520.
Also 'X' or 'O' rings are all to do with how much friction each produces, the X ring has less contact with the side plates but better sealing properties and therefor have less friction opposed to an 'O' ring. Again racers tend to use a Non X or O ring chain but it does not compromise the strength unless it's neglected and that's why it's not recommended for the road.

The other thing to consider is, Although the Scrambler is a road bike, because of the word 'Scrambler', owners seem to think it's somehow suitable to take offroad. Even the more offroad style of the Urban Enduro has a clue in the title 'Urban'. No different to taking a monster offroad that is.
That said, for those who do go offroad, they need to think about the odd branch etc. flicking up and pinging the split-link clip off as Ive seen done many years ago when a lot of dirt bikes used the split link. This is actually the reason why the 'closed end' of the clip faces forward to the direction of chain travel to help prevent being dislodged.
 

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Any chain, whether it's a human chain or a bike chain is as strong as it's weakest link.
You don't need to touch the tension adjusters to remove the wheel. Remove the axle and the wheel can roll forward allowing the chain to be removed from the sprocket.and hang over the swingarm end.
It's up to you but my thoughts are;
  • If you have to buy three links to find the correct one.
  • You think avoiding the tensioners is a bonus.
  • Blame a chain that's too tight for stretching a link and you keep meaning to loosen it up 'a bit'
  • Don't realise the gearbox output bearing is being tortured.
You should have a professional look after your bike.

Yeah, the opinions are bi-polar all over the web including here. When I said the link was barely perceptibly bent I meant just that. My take is that if the master link is made of the same materials as the chain, then all the same except perhaps the clip can fall off and then the chain disassembles. The pins are the obvious weak link as the link plates are way more strong than they need to be to hold the pins. Given that the master link is made by someone other than the chain maker that means there will be differences.

I had read that dirt bike guys leave the chain looser because of the travel. With 6" of travel on our rear end, it seems that to error on too loose would be better. Never drove chain drive bikes before and the sag spec does seem pretty tight given how little adjustment on the axle changes things. I understand forces and how the output bearing works. I don't ride crazy but I like twisties and the occasional dirt road in the middle of nowhere so I doubt "torture" is the right word.

And yes, I could have a professional look after my bike if I didn't have a mortgage, kids in college and the whole human catrostophe:) I like to take care of my cars, house and life without having to relinquish control to "professionals". Each to his own. I'll let you know if the bike spits out the chain or the tranny blows up. Not everyone is ready to accept the results of their handywork, no shame in that.

Have fun

Phil
 

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The output shaft of a gearbox is tortured just by having a chain too tight and has nothing to do with the way it's ridden. When a gearbox starts the high pitched whine then it's too late.
 
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