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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ordered a rear luggage rack on eBay, supposedly made to fit all Scrambler models, which did not fit my Standard 1100. In the course of determining whether I could "make" it fit, I took a lot of measurements (and decided it was not possible) which I used to find a generic rack that could be made to fit. My hope was to find a rack that needed very little cutting or welding to make it fit the Scrambler 1100 rear sub-frame.
I ended up buying one for a Yamaha RSZ (or maybe RS Zero) scooter, that had the approximate dimensions I was looking for; about 480 x 400 x 80mm/18.89 x 15.75 x 3.15inch. The eBay auction title is " Metal Rear Rack Carrier Luggage Support Brace for Yamaha RSZ Black" The price (today) is $28.21, shipping included.
It turned out to be a pretty good match, although the front mounts were somewhat flimsy and a bit short to reach the
DSCN2912.JPG sub-frame bolts I intended to use. Note, I say "flimsy" but they will work if you don't plan to carry a heavy load. As for being short, one can open the slot for the bolt at the ends of the arms and use a large washer to secure the mounts to the subframe. I didn't want to be limited and decided to use 1" x 1/8" x 3 1/4" flat steel stock to lengthen and re-enforce the mounts, which did require welding. It is also necessary to drill through the sub-frame at the forward bolt holding the seat latch plate and chase the threads, tapping the new portion of the hole 8M x 1.25mm. (To avoid damaging the existing threads, I drilled an 1/8" pilot hole, followed by a 1/4" hole through the sub-frame, then finished by re-threading the hole as above. A longer bolt extending below the sub-frame is needed to attach the rack mounts.)
DSCN2896.JPG

It's also necessary to drill through the rear fender and fender under liner to attach the rear rack mount. It might not be necessary, but for added strength, I inserted another 1" x 1/8" x 4" length of flat stock (with an 8mm hole in the center) between the fender and the tail light mounting bars to spread the load and prevent possible damage to the fender and a second 5" length of flat stock under the tail light bars to allow lifting the rack if needed.

The final result looks like it was made for the Scrambler 1100 and is sturdy enough that I wouldn't hesitate to carry 30
or 40 pounds back there, though I will probably only use a tail bag:
DSCN9733.JPG DSCN9741.JPG

Sorry for not having more "process" photos; I wasn't planning to post anything about the rack, but re-considered when I toted up the cost and realized this could be pretty useful to other owners.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I happen to have a tail box (trunk) with a very low mount left over from another bike, and set it on the trunk to see how it looks. If I do any more than day trips with the Scrambler, it will be with this trunk on the back.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Overall, would you say it's worth it compared to buying a specific fit rack, for, say, $242?
I'm retired, my hourly pay rate is $0.00 and I've accumulated tools and bits of scrap metal and hardware for over 50 years. I can spend hours on the computer looking for suitable (cheap) substitutes for name brand parts and not be giving anything up. For me, the chase alone is usually worth the effort. When I can achieve functional equivalence (as in this case), it's worth it. For others, who's time (even spare time) is more valuable and would have to buy tools or pay someone to weld or cut materials, maybe not. If you have time and doing something like adapting a Yamaha rack to a Duc might be a challenge - consider this: $30 x 8 = $240. You can screw up seven racks and if you get the 8th one right, you will have saved $2. :D
That said, when I can't find something I can "re-purpose", I will buy a name brand item as quickly as anyone (I do have a Scrambler specific Givi windscreen on my 1100).
 

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I'm retired, my hourly pay rate is $0.00 and I've accumulated tools and bits of scrap metal and hardware for over 50 years. I can spend hours on the computer looking for suitable (cheap) substitutes for name brand parts and not be giving anything up. For me, the chase alone is usually worth the effort. When I can achieve functional equivalence (as in this case), it's worth it. For others, who's time (even spare time) is more valuable and would have to buy tools or pay someone to weld or cut materials, maybe not. If you have time and doing something like adapting a Yamaha rack to a Duc might be a challenge - consider this: $30 x 8 = $240. You can screw up seven racks and if you get the 8th one right, you will have saved $2. :D
That said, when I can't find something I can "re-purpose", I will buy a name brand item as quickly as anyone (I do have a Scrambler specific Givi windscreen on my 1100).
Totally makes sense! Thanks, that’s what I wanted to know before deciding for myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
To update - I had the top box on the Yamaha rack, with the engine running and noticed the box blocked my view of the brake and tail light. However, I was right next to, or a foot or two behind the bike up against my car (parked in front of the bike) which prevented me from getting a realistic perspective of the lights. With the car out of the garage, I took these photos (tail light only and brake/tail light together) from about 20 feet away. I'm no longer concerned about being seen.
If there is a problem, tapping into the tail light harness and adding a strip of LED lights to the box is easily accomplished.

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