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Discussion Starter #1
Hi after 1800 miles riding my full throttle which I love I have one question is the stock suspension really fit for purpose
 

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If the purpose is to be totally reminiscent of 1962, and the crappy suspensions of the day - then yes.
 

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The suspension seems to hold the road ok and is liable to buck off the rider. I have to imagine that in 1962 it was the other way around :) What I don't like is that this isn't new experimental technology and the difference between good and (this bad) suspension isn't rocket science or even expensive and exotic parts, yet here we are with a mono shock and compression/rebound setup on the front that completely suck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The suspension seems to hold the road ok and is liable to buck off the rider. I have to imagine that in 1962 it was the other way around :) What I don't like is that this isn't new experimental technology and the difference between good and (this bad) suspension isn't rocket science or even expensive and exotic parts, yet here we are with a mono shock and compression/rebound setup on the front that completely suck.
 

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It's just cheap stuff - understandable on a bike built to a price point such as the Scrambler.

I don't think many would even would notice if it wasn't for the horrible seat too.

Crappy suspension + horrible seat = a very sore ass.
 

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With high humidity the Scrambler is a top contender on the monkey butt scale.

That is EXACTLY what my butt felt like after a recent 300 mile ride.
 

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I'm not sure what to think, everyone keeps mentioning how bad the suspension is. I just don't get it but everybody can't be wrong.
I was running 32psi front and rear tyre pressure and thought my bike was spot on. After it had it's 1st service I rode it and thought it's a bit harder than it was, my tyre pressures had been put to 36F & 42R. I adjusted them back down to 30psi both ends and the bikes better than ever.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Agree totally with what you say about roadholding its the bucking on the a and b roads in England that's the problem
That is EXACTLY what my butt felt like after a recent 300 mile ride.
The sore ass I can cope with its the internal organs I worry about
 

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It's just not compliant enough to warrant any sort of enduro type endorsement. I find it kind of endearing around town and on any highway that does NOT have frost heaves. I have yet to let some air out of the tires which might change my opinion. I'm trying to watch how the tread blocks wear to make up my mind on where I want to run them.
 

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It's just not compliant enough to warrant any sort of enduro type endorsement. I find it kind of endearing around town and on any highway that does NOT have frost heaves. I have yet to let some air out of the tires which might change my opinion. I'm trying to watch how the tread blocks wear to make up my mind on where I want to run them.
Be careful with that - if you run lower pressures those tires melt like butter, they are a very soft compound.
 

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That's my main concern. I've seen people chew up similar style tires (Avon Distanzia) because they were lazy about maintaining off-road and on-road tire pressure.

Ideally I'd get that fancy suspension setup that Ogre had put on his bike. I just don't have anywhere locally that I trust to rebuild the front forks with those inserts. I also like the looks of that Nitron R1 shock because I don't need a fancy reservoir with the shock. I'd like to keep it simple, just higher quality with adjustable preload.

I'm getting the thicker seat which may completely change my mind about everything. The Icon seat after it has become more compliant is about like riding on the seat pan of another bike.
 

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There are a number of options available right now, some at a reasonable cost, to address the the poor shock - but the forks are the real culprit - and expensive to rectify.

Out back, the Nitron R1 is probably my solution of choice right now.

I'm not so sure I'm willing to dump a grand into cartridge inserts for the front end, hoping someone comes up with an effective but cheaper alternative, like emulators and matched springs with some preload adjusters.

BTW - those Avon Distanzias are great tires, not nearly as soft as these, thus they wear a lot longer, without giving up too much in the grip department.

But alas - no 18" front.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
There are a number of options available right now, some at a reasonable cost, to address the the poor shock - but the forks are the real culprit - and expensive to rectify.

Out back, the Nitron R1 is probably my solution of choice right now.

I'm not so sure I'm willing to dump a grand into cartridge inserts for the front end, hoping someone comes up with an effective but cheaper alternative, like emulators and matched springs with some preload adjusters.

BTW - those Avon Distanzias are great tires, not nearly as soft as these, thus they wear a lot longer, without giving up too much in the grip department.

But alas - no 18" front.
Totally agree that the forks are the problem for me
 

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That's always the looming decision: Is it worth spend 1/5th the purchase price of the bike to make it ride a bit better. I've done progressive springs, oil weights, preload with other bikes I have that people swear up and down online make a night and day difference and then in the end to me it doesn't feel like a whole lot happened in terms of dive control, bump handling, etc... It's always such an subjective thing among two people as to what's worth the price and what's overpriced.

The sachs in the rear though? It's a piece of crap, no doubt about it. For me I know that both the fork and the rear are equally to blame but my hunch is that money is better spent on the Nitron than the inserts. I've always had more bang for the buck replacing rear shocks than going inside of the forks. But I've never ponied up for racetech gold valve emulators.
 

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The emulators are obviously not as good as a true cartridge - but there are still a few guys around who can set them up to work wonders. When I raced my Suzuki SV, it was in a class that did not allow the forks to have the internals replaced, but emulators were allowed. They were pretty damn good after working out all the kinks.

I knew from my test rides before the purchase that I would be dumping money into suspension for this bike, and was fully prepared to spend about $1500 to do so, but the price of the cartridges would blow that budget, so I'm waiting patiently for Racetech or YSS to get some emulators available.
 

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2000 kms in and i still like my suspension. The forks are better than i had on a 750ss or 900ss or monster S ie . The rear shock is controlled and sprung well for my 98 kg weight. Its normal damping is very very good but i think the high speed damping (thats pot holes, sound bars, sharp bumps, not to be confused with high MPH) is just non existent! How anyone rides these bikes on dirt i do not know. In this area it both bottoms and tops out way to easily. I have a KTM exc400 for that anyway.
Flicking my Scrambler through multiple S bends is a joy and that's where most poor suspension shows its faults by wobbling and weaving and steering inaccurately. My scrambler does none of that. But there has been so much negative comment about the suspension i can only think it is just poor consistency/quality control across all the bikes.
I think the suspension is quite "sporty", controlled and firm. If you're coming off a cruiser, then maybe you weren't expecting that and maybe that's the other possibility.
 

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I think we're probably all feeling the same thing, just that we all interpret it differently. I'm used to riding vintage bikes so I'm used to the whole 'rubber cow' experience of a vintage BMW airhead for instance. My other bikes are dual shock and really compliant. Old (simple) forks and all that jazz. They all suck WAY more than the Scrambler in the corners. But they take frost heaves with gusto and my teeth don't slam together (twice.. once for the front fork and rear shock) like they do on the Ducati.
 
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