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Hi, Scramblerati

170+miles on my Icon and I still can't get used to the throttle. Coming out of tight junctions, even applying the throttle in bends, seems to require liberal amounts of clutch, and sometimes rear brake, to stop me lurching offline. Also, bike seems to have significant engine-braking when closing the throttle. Anyone else the same? Does it ease off with a few more miles?

Front brake could 'bite' a bit earlier, but I suppose they are still quite 'fresh'.

Oh, dear, sounds like a lot of moaning. I am having a laugh on it, once on the move, anyway.
 

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I hear you, I despise these kinds of traits. Hoping there'll be some fixes.

Sarah
 

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Hi, Scramblerati

170+miles on my Icon and I still can't get used to the throttle. Coming out of tight junctions, even applying the throttle in bends, seems to require liberal amounts of clutch, and sometimes rear brake, to stop me lurching offline. Also, bike seems to have significant engine-braking when closing the throttle. Anyone else the same? Does it ease off with a few more miles?

Front brake could 'bite' a bit earlier, but I suppose they are still quite 'fresh'.

Oh, dear, sounds like a lot of moaning. I am having a laugh on it, once on the move, anyway.
Your not moaning, just observing. Something I can't do yet (no bike)
I'm looking forward to the opportunity to have a good moan.

Mileage should have no affect on engine braking, until the engine is virtually worn out that is. Engine braking is relative to the combined compression of the cylinders. The engine turns the wheel when driving, but, the wheel is trying to turn the engine while the throttle is off. the amount of braking is relevant to how difficult it is to turn the engine.
Some here will already know about 'slipper clutch' fitted to some higher spec bikes. This stops the rear wheel locking up when changing down too low too quickly, getting rid of some of the engine braking effect by allowing the clutch to slip.

Beautiful day here in Scotland, I had to take my 1290 Superduke out for a two hundred mile squirt down the twisty Aviemore, Loch Laggan to Fort William road and back, Life's a bitch.
 

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I thought the Scrambler came with a slipper clutch, no?

I wonder how hurky/jerky the throttle really is. I have a 2007 KTM that was accused of having the same trait. I never noticed it on that bike.

tick tock tick tock
 

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Hi, Scramblerati

170+miles on my Icon and I still can't get used to the throttle. Coming out of tight junctions, even applying the throttle in bends, seems to require liberal amounts of clutch, and sometimes rear brake, to stop me lurching offline. Also, bike seems to have significant engine-braking when closing the throttle. Anyone else the same? Does it ease off with a few more miles?

Front brake could 'bite' a bit earlier, but I suppose they are still quite 'fresh'.

Oh, dear, sounds like a lot of moaning. I am having a laugh on it, once on the move, anyway.
Yes that's not moaning at all its getting used to it and getting it in your head how it needs to be controlled. Almost like nerves. It still gets me on slow turn arounds sort of thing but shut my mind off. Not caught me out but just makes me tut !. Yes great engine braking and better than my Monsters over the years and 748. Its brilliant tbh and that's normal with V2 / L2 so don't be shocked. The bars have rubber mounts so you can squeeze that brake more as your feeling the bars maove when braking so you may be backing off.
 

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I haven't found any probs with engine braking, it doesn't seem to be any different to my other bikes. I do find the throttle very sensitive, I've been trying all kinds of ways to ease the 'snatchiness' but nothing has worked. I find the main problem to be when I am riding over rough roads and the bumps transmit to my right hand!

That throttle tube tamer looks interesting ..
 

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If yours is a bit worse than others seem to be, could it be that the free play at the twist grip is too much. There should only be a 2-3 degrees of rotation before the slack is taken up. That would/does cause it to be snatchy. Worth a check.
 

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I think we're dealing with the nature of fuel injection in general, made worse by today's emissions standards. Some bikes seem much more affected that others, even within the same models. Doug's (my husband) 2010 Bonneville exhibited these same traits, fixed completely by adjusting the throttle position sensor. Had to have a laptop (lucky we have a good buddy) and a special cable, you can read about it here if you like:
TTP Triumph Twin EFI Tunes

The Triumph forums offer plenty of how-to, and once our buddy brought over his laptop the whole job was done in no time. He had already downloaded a new tune to suit Doug's aftermarket pipes, but it was the TPS adjustment that eliminated the low rpm surge and nasty behavior just off idle. And as I'm thinking about this, I remember the WR250R I had several years ago; some of us hated the snatchy jerky throttle, other owners couldn't understand what we were complaining about. Some extra sharp owner finally discovered the TPS values could be displayed within the diagnostics on the dashboard and set about adjusting the TPS simply by rapping it solidly on one side just to nudge it a tad in that direction. I followed suit and my bike was a different animal from that day forward, made it an entirely different riding experience. You can read about the WR TPS tapping here if you like:
TPS adjustment - Throttle On Off at idle

Here's hoping some sharp folks will put their minds to this straight away and get it sorted for the Scrambler.

Sarah
 

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The TPS on Ducatis is non-adjustable. The Siemens ECU does an auto-reset of the TPS at switch-on (or maybe it's at every 3 or 4 switch-on). It takes the closed throttle position as the default and works out all the fuel and ignition timing from that point for all openings of the throttle and engine speeds. This of course depends on it being correctly mechanically set up by the factory.
I have come across 2 (and there must be many more) S4RS Monsters which had not been set up correctly at the factory. They use a Magneti Marelli ECU and the TPS reset must be done from software and the throttle stop is set at the factory and is not supposed to be meddled with. The TPS reset is done with a closed throttle and the ECU gives a value of 2.7º (for the S4RS) to that position. On the first bike I did I found that even with the throttle stop wound right out the TPS still registered 1.8º and not 0º as it should have done. By resetting the TPS with the throttle stop backed off completely then winding it in until I got a reading of double the value (5.4º) then doing another TPS reset I got the correct reading at the correct throttle position. This completely transformed the low speed running of the bike. The owner was so pleased he decided to keep it instead of selling it.
Now the Scrambler's ECU might not work like this, but apart from the TPS auto-reset I suspect it does. Unfortunately there is as yet no diagnostic software available to us that might help, but it will come.
 
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I've only ridden an icon on a test ride for about 100 miles but it did find the opening of the throttle a bit snatchy at take off.
About half way through the ride I discovered the engine likes to rev at about 4000rpm, so needing to select the correct gear for the speed, entering and leaving bends and it goes like a dream. The engine does not respond well to being under load below 2000rpm and you tend to have a really lumpy feel to the drive if you try.
 

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Mine felt snatchy to start with, but either I have gotten used to it or my new race map has altered it a little, I ride a scooter to work everyday, so the throttle on that gets lots of use, when I jump on my Icon at weekends I don't find the transition is anything I have to think about
 

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I think it may be what you're used to,

I'm old enough to remember quick action throttles hitting the market for motocross and enduro bikes, the hot modification was a Magura quick action throttle.

I love the sharp throttle response in pretty much all situations except when pulling a mono, not sure what that is in other countries, riding on the back wheel.

Maybe I'm completely off track here but an 800cc trail bike weighing 175 kg's, that screams hoon bike to me, a quick throttle seems entirely in character, don't bother trying to be smooth, get on and belt it!
 

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I think it may be what you're used to,

I'm old enough to remember quick action throttles hitting the market for motocross and enduro bikes, the hot modification was a Magura quick action throttle.

I love the sharp throttle response in pretty much all situations except when pulling a mono, not sure what that is in other countries, riding on the back wheel.

Maybe I'm completely off track here but an 800cc trail bike weighing 175 kg's, that screams hoon bike to me, a quick throttle seems entirely in character, don't bother trying to be smooth, get on and belt it!
In Scotland a 'mono' is called a 'wheelie', and
'belt it' = 'gie it lauldy'.
 

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I don't mind a quick throttle, It's a throttle that's difficult to modulate that I dislike. And from experience, some bikes are much worse than others, so there's always folks who can't understand what the fuss is about. If you happen to have one of the difficult bikes, it's generally a vast relief to get it sorted. I'm not trying to be critical, just shedding a little light.

Sarah
 

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I don't mind a quick throttle, It's a throttle that's difficult to modulate that I dislike. And from experience, some bikes are much worse than others, so there's always folks who can't understand what the fuss is about. If you happen to have one of the difficult bikes, it's generally a vast relief to get it sorted. I'm not trying to be critical, just shedding a little light.

Sarah
Agreed.
At the moment I think what we need to figure out is if Little Owl has a fault that could improve things if repaired/adjusted. Or, if in time it will become second nature.
 

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Sarah,

One of the issues we're facing is an engine with an inherent lack of bottom end, the facts are Ducati have added a few extra cc's and a heavier fly wheel to give it some bottom end while protecting the top end of the rev range, reality is it still has very little usable bottom end, ride a Triumph Scrambler back to back and you'll see / feel what I mean. The Triumph has strong torque in the lower revs but bugger all up top, not that it revs very far.

Next ride out try keeping the revs above 4,000, unless there's something else wrong that should smooth things nicely. If it doesn't, there's something else wrong and the dealer should be looking at it.
 
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