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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After 40,000 or so miles on my Tiger 800, I've concluded that it may be the perfect bike for the adventure camping I never quite get around to doing. Something smaller, lighter, nimbler, and more Italian might make more sense for the riding I actually do, so I've been looking at... you guessed it... Scramblers. The Icon in particular, because getting a Desert Sled to replace a Triumph Tiger that has very similar specifications seems to miss the point of getting something different :)

I cannot be the only person who has contemplated this very same change. Surely there must be dozens of riders on this forum alone who have switched from staid English staidness to flamboyant Italian flamboyance. What was your experience? How would you compare the two bikes? What would I appreciate? What should I dread? And how will I keep my wife from riding it all the time and leaving me with her Kawasaki?
 

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I own both a Tiger XRX and a Scrambler Full Throttle.
The Scrambler is more nimble, great fun to ride and provides way more grins per km (or mile for you guys) than the Tiger does.
The Tiger is rock solid and acts as a pack horse for the Scrambler when my wife and I go away for the weekend (we have literally just returned home from a 600km overnighter about an hour ago).
Both bikes are geared more or less the same and both return almost identical fuel mileage when running side by side on the same roads at the same time but keep in mind that the Tiger is at least 20kg heavier to start with, I'm a good 15kg or so heavier than my wife and I get to carry all the luggage. The Scrambler makes less power but it is not really noticeable given the lighter weight and a being an air cooled L twin as opposed to a water cooled triple the power delivery is quite different. The Scrambler feels more raw and not as refined which IMO is part of its charm. They really do remind me of those overpowered Japanese sport bikes with suspect suspension that we loved in the 1970s and I at least still have a soft spot for.
You won't be able to keep your wife from riding the Scrambler all the time. I know that for a fact.
This is a pic from November when we did around 1200km over two nights.



and prior to that in June last year where we did around 400km for an overnight trip to run the Scrambler in.



I think the Scrambler will be a more maintenance intensive bike that the Tiger over the longer period with things like the silly one size too small drive chain that won't last very long and it is not easy to carry a lot of luggage on one that way you can on a Tiger but if you are not doing the big miles that you thought you wanted to do they really are a great bike. We get around 250km fairly easily from the Scrambler when we ride together. We usually start thinking about fuel around the 200km mark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Those are awesome photos. Members of my tribe envy you :) Thanks for the comparison. I'm particularly interested in the range you've been getting because some of my favorite rides in the San Benitos are 200 km between fuel stops, and far from any cell phone coverage. I'll attach a photo I took when I was out checking some of the burn scars from last year's fires so you can see how desolate things can get a 2.5 hour ride from downtown San Francisco. This one got a bit too 'interesting' a few km later and I found myself wishing for something with a lower center of gravity, which is one of the attractions of the Scrambler.

Now I'm trying to imagine what a red Icon with a small topcase, a fly screen, slightly lower bars, and a Classic rear fender would look like in this setting. Though I'd also settle for yellow :)

100_1230x3r25.jpg
 

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Shouldn’t it be D. Scrambler or T. Scrambler? T. for Triumph. ;-)
 

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It is not Ducati Scrambler. Scrambler is a brand name in its own right that currently encompasses a range of 800 and 1100cc motorcycles. It is similar to BMW and Mini. You don’t call it a BMW Mini.
 

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Is it? Sure about that? Can hardly imagine, scrambler is such a generic word in the motorcycle world...

Or was it “Scrambler Ducati”?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Now I get to do the comparison. Interesting. My first thought was, "Wow! Smaller!" My second thought was, "Why have I been wrestling a 470-lb adventure bike over these roads for the past 5 years?" :)
 

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Now I get to do the comparison. Interesting. My first thought was, "Wow! Smaller!" My second thought was, "Why have I been wrestling a 470-lb adventure bike over these roads for the past 5 years?" :)
Because the Tiger is more comfortable handles better is faster has better brakes and the noise of that triple when wound up in the rev range is elixir for the soul.
Having said that the Scrambler is great fun albeit different fun. IMO the bikes are different and they both have pros and cons that is why I enjoy owning and riding both.
 

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Because the Tiger is more comfortable handles better is faster has better brakes and the noise of that triple when wound up in the rev range is elixir for the soul.
Having said that the Scrambler is great fun albeit different fun. IMO the bikes are different and they both have pros and cons that is why I enjoy owning and riding both.
In your opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
...and the noise of that triple when wound up in the rev range is elixir for the soul...
I quite agree! There's also the neat way it sets every small yappy dog in a 3-mile radius barking its head off -- apparently the ancestors of small yappy dogs once had some enemy that had three cylinders. I was seriously considering carrying things a step further and replacing the Tiger with a Street Triple, but neither seemed quite right for the kind of roads I like to ride. One was too big when the going got tough -- there have been times I feared I'd have to stop, dissassemble the bike, carry the parts across some obstacle one by one, and put them back together on the other side. The the other had an additional 5 gears and 30 hp I'd never be able to use on some of those pavement surfaces -- note that I'm using the term 'pavement' rather loosely here :)

If all goes well...and I don't decide to go flying... I may crank out a few miles today to get a better opinion. We'll see how this works out...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I just got back from a short 200 mile ride on the same roads I took the Tiger on last weekend.

Wow! Big difference!

The Scrambler's a lot easier to fling around. I hadn't realized just how much work it was to ride some of those roads on the Tiger. You may be dancing around the turns on both bikes, but one is dancing with that aerobics instructor, the other is dancing with a svelte hippo. I was surprised at how flexible the Ducati twin was -- IMHO, it's every bit the equal of the Triumph triple. And I did feel the Ducati has the edge when it comes to brakes.

Comfort seemed about the same to me. I'm fairly tall, (6'1", 34" inseam), ancient (don't ask) and far from flexible, but I had no problem with the leg position after 200 miles. The stock seat on the 2019 may not have matched the incomparable excellence of the stock seat on the Tiger, but I doubt I'll be in a hurry to change it. That being said...

...that suspension! Hmm. I kept the bike on the road, and kept me on the bike, but I'm not entirely sure it kept my kidneys in my body. And I cannot recall ever having a mirror jar on the Tiger. There may be some Ohlins or Andreani components in our future.

...there will also be a windscreen in our future. Riding up Route 1 into a 20 MPH headwind was made ever more entertaining by the way my helmet started to lift off my head every time a gust hit.

...those appendiabiti scimmia (the Italian phrase for 'ape hanger') handlebars may get changed. Yes, they make it easy to stand on the pegs for all the off-roading I'm never going to do, but the FT swap, as recommended by many bright minds on this forum, may fit me better.


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