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I have to agree with Derek on that one , use jubilee clips, Make sure you buy the correct size quick releases, think they come in 6mm and 8mm, And make sure the release lever can't easily be pressed when riding, I wired mine just to be on the safe side,
 

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Well, this evening we lifted the tank to install the BoosterPlug and figured what the heck, we'll fiddle with the fuel line connections, might luck up and figure them out.....nope, no way. The electrical connections came apart with no trouble at all, but we can't figure out the fuel lines to save our lives. Squeeze? Push? Pull? Did all that, tried every which way. We have no idea how you use the little gadget from MotoWheels, either. We're stumped. Help?

Sarah
 

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Looking at the Service Manual p.549 disconnecting the fuel lines should be a fairly simple operation. Probably the real trick is knowing how to do the deed and not get sprayed with 91 octane.
step 1, push the grey colored locking collars against the base of the fuel pump assembly.
step 2, pull the tubing free of the collars.
Possibly there is enough residual pressure in the system making this hard to do? Somewhere it is written how to relieve the fuel pressure when dealing with a fuel injected motorcycle. If this is all not so easy as the Duc book makes out, possibly pop off the crimp style hose clamps and replace with screw clamps available at the local auto parts store?
 

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Yes, I think you first unplug the electrical connections to the pump, then turn on the key, this is supposed to relieve pressure in the pump and lines. We tried that, but we'll try again, maybe it needs to be done a few times. Thanks, DouglasLee.

Sarah
 

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Life was much easier when we had carbs and petrol taps: tank removal was fairly simple then. Was it Phil Irving who once said "simplify and add lightness?"
 

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Yes, I think you first unplug the electrical connections to the pump, then turn on the key, this is supposed to relieve pressure in the pump and lines. We tried that, but we'll try again, maybe it needs to be done a few times.
Do the above then thumb the starter. The engine may fire a few times but will very rapidly die due to lack of fuel. There will then be no pressure in the fuel lines.
 

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Elvisto-- you are right, but I'm overdue for a valve check, so I need to remove the tank.

Auriga-- back and forth in the garage yesterday, I gave my DR650 a loving pat every time I passed by.

Derek-- wonderful, we'll give it a try, thank you!

Sarah
 

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Sarah,
My son now has my TR5T, but I think he pats it from time to time: I only have two Ducatis in my garage - son has my Monster in his - but I occasionally pat my DS.
I never rode a DR650, but had a few rides on a SP370 and a DR400, which was impressive, but I still think my XR250 was the best all round trail bike. Pity I never rode the 400 when my son had one, before he went onto two stroke KTMs.
It will be a pity if the Scrambler acquires a poor reputation on account of various design faults. Perhaps one of the enthusiastic engineers will take a Scrambler apart, identify the crap parts and then make decent replacements, at reasonable money.
Mike
 

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Yes, I think you first unplug the electrical connections to the pump, then turn on the key, this is supposed to relieve pressure in the pump and lines.
If you disconnect electrically the pump and then turn on the key, nothing will happen in the pump, so I don't see how magically it may relieve the pressure. I've never bothered about relieving the pressure when disconnecting the fuel lines on my ST2 and there is no pressure in the lines when the pump is not turning.
 

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Life was much easier when we had carbs and petrol taps: tank removal was fairly simple then. Was it Phil Irving who once said "simplify and add lightness?"
My Yamaha SR400 has FI and a petcock, when it came out in the states everyone was like "why does it have a petcock?". Now we know :) So much easier to take off the tank.
 

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Well, we're not sure we can say just exactly how we did it, but the tank is off. We think it might be helpful to push in on the elbow at the same time you push in on the collar (push in meaning push toward the pump) in order to help the spring-loaded fingers release their grip on the elbow. Once you've got the whole mess pushed in, hold the pressure on the collar and pull straight down on the elbow, this first go round took a pretty good pull to get the elbows loose. I stood on the left side of the bike and wrapped my arms on either side of the tank as if to give it a bear hug and used both hands to push in on the collar while Doug made sure to pull straight down on the elbow.
DSCN4012.JPG


The bear hug comes in handy, as it allows your body to hold down the tank while your fingers are pushing hard on the collar. Doug was on a shop stool eye-level with the under side of the tank making sure he was pulling straight down without stressing the elbow. We never did use the Moto tool, it's tight up under there and since we didn't know what we were doing, we were afraid to use the pressure needed to wedge it in and snap it on to the elbow. Hope the picture helps folks see what they're dealing with; let me say that it's not nearly the flimsy outfit we'd feared, but it does take some technique. Still fairly scary when you're in the midst of it. Thanks so much for all the help, everybody.

Sarah
 

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Hello

One question : when lifting the tank, are both hoses long enough to put the hands under the tank and cut the hoses not far from the elbow to install quick connectors like I've shown previously ?

And do you think that there will be place for these connectors when the tank is back down in place ? A hose with a quick-connector becomes somewhat unbending for about 10 cm.
 

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I wish you'd take a peek under your tank Vince, because I'm just not sure what to tell you. I snapped a few pictures for you, not the best shots but maybe they'll give you an idea:
DSCN4013.JPG
DSCN4016.JPG
DSCN4017.JPG


Seems like quick connectors would work, there's a good length of straight hose.

Sarah
 

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Hello

Thanks a lot for all these pics. They are self-explanatory.
I'm afraid it will be quite difficult to put quick-connectors on the hoses. At least, they should be installed very near from the elbow, in the part where the hoses are not bent.

Another solution, maybe even simpler, would be to remove the clips that hold the hoses on the elbows and replace them by screwed clips (we call them Serflex here in France). Instead of disconnecting the elbow, you would just have to unscrew the clip, remove it and remove the hose from the elbow.

I'll see, when I'll will have to remove my tank. Not planned before next summer, when the warranty is over.
 

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Finished the valve adjustment:

Valve adjustment

Now the tank's back on and we've cycled the pump several times and started the bike with no spewing fuel, so we hope we got the connections right. Push the elbows straight in with a fair amount of pressure and you'll feel/hear a click as the fingers pop back in place over the ridge on the elbow. Once seated, they'll feel very solidly in place.

Sarah
 

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fairly simple to remove the hoses. Just press on the grey collar in and the hoses pop out. the only PITA was the breather pipe. Dont turn the ignition on when playing with the electrical socket, dont want a spark.
 
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