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Well, we're not sure we can say just exactly how we did it, but the tank is off. We think it might be helpful to push in on the elbow at the same time you push in on the collar (push in meaning push toward the pump) in order to help the spring-loaded fingers release their grip on the elbow. Once you've got the whole mess pushed in, hold the pressure on the collar and pull straight down on the elbow, this first go round took a pretty good pull to get the elbows loose. I stood on the left side of the bike and wrapped my arms on either side of the tank as if to give it a bear hug and used both hands to push in on the collar while Doug made sure to pull straight down on the elbow. View attachment 6722

The bear hug comes in handy, as it allows your body to hold down the tank while your fingers are pushing hard on the collar. Doug was on a shop stool eye-level with the under side of the tank making sure he was pulling straight down without stressing the elbow. We never did use the Moto tool, it's tight up under there and since we didn't know what we were doing, we were afraid to use the pressure needed to wedge it in and snap it on to the elbow. Hope the picture helps folks see what they're dealing with; let me say that it's not nearly the flimsy outfit we'd feared, but it does take some technique. Still fairly scary when you're in the midst of it. Thanks so much for all the help, everybody.

Sarah
This should be a sticky
Thanks Sarah, exact same result, not certain I can do it easily next time but two people makes it possible at least
Our hoses didn't pop out, was a gently bently push and pull affair
But this picture has me confused, there is open hole on your breather box in this picture (just above ring finger)


Mine has no hole or slight mark where it would be
Is US v Australian versions but NFI what goes in hole
 

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That should be where the vent tank for the crankcase breather attaches. It would be secured by a screw into the threaded insert at the top left. See item 4 in the picture.

Screen Shot 2017-04-24 at 09.18.11.png
 

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Thanks Derek, there's no way I could tell Jackson what went where. We were in the middle of the valve adjustment and it felt like we had the bike in a million pieces.

Sarah
 

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Thanks both
Perspective of photograph explained, sure mine looks the same.
Derek, I had no reason to remove breather box, realise now Sarah did, D'oh
 

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Sorry to revive this thread, but I'm looking to take the tank off my Scrambler for the first time. I have a 2017 model FT. I see there's a special tool available from Motowheels.com designed to depress the fuel line locking collars. Is that absolutely essential to get the job done?

Any tips and tricks to doing it without the special tool beyond what's been written up already? I've ordered one of the tools but it will take a couple of days to get here.

thanks!
 

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Sorry to revive this thread, but I'm looking to take the tank off my Scrambler for the first time. I have a 2017 model FT. I see there's a special tool available from Motowheels.com designed to depress the fuel line locking collars. Is that absolutely essential to get the job done?

Any tips and tricks to doing it without the special tool beyond what's been written up already? I've ordered one of the tools but it will take a couple of days to get here.

thanks!
IF you just need to lift the tank (to get underneath) there is a quite a bit of hose slack. You may not need to remove it. Otherwise you risk breaking the damn connectors on the FP.
 

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I'll look into whether I can get what I want done without removing it. But I'm doing a few things ... re-routing cables and electrical connection stuff for a handlebar change, changing headlight and turn signals, etc ... that would be much more conveniently done with the tank out of the way entirely. There's just so little working room with the tank in the way, it's very frustrating and annoying.

On all my bikes in the past, when I wanted to work on this kind of stuff, I'd just pop the fuel lines and lift the tank off. Sigh.
 

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I did exactly
I'll look into whether I can get what I want done without removing it. But I'm doing a few things ... re-routing cables and electrical connection stuff for a handlebar change, changing headlight and turn signals, etc ... that would be much more conveniently done with the tank out of the way entirely. There's just so little working room with the tank in the way, it's very frustrating and annoying.

On all my bikes in the past, when I wanted to work on this kind of stuff, I'd just pop the fuel lines and lift the tank off. Sigh.
the work you want to do is easy enough with the tank on the side - I ran spotlight wire myself that way - the backbone can be got at. because I have had those exact fuel line connectors to the FP fail under warranty I did not want to mess with them.
 

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Ramarren,

We didn't use the special tool. I do think it would be handy to have another person to help, if you could. Be sure to note Vince's suggestion on the vacuum lines, here's a copy&paste of his post:

"In fact, when you've removed the 4 bolts (rear and front), the tank doesn't move that much, not because of the fuel lines, but because of the 2 vacuum lines in the front. These 2 lines are difficult to disconnect because they are strongly tightened on the tank. To lift the tank easily, just free the 2 vacuum lines on all their mounting points on the frame. Then, they can come up with the tank and you can lift the tank to reach the electric plug and and the fuel lines. It becomes then easier to disconnect the fuel lines because you can access them with all your fingers and press on their mechanism to disconnect them."

Good luck, and be sure to let us know how it goes.

Sarah
 

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I did exactly

the work you want to do is easy enough with the tank on the side - I ran spotlight wire myself that way - the backbone can be got at. because I have had those exact fuel line connectors to the FP fail under warranty I did not want to mess with them.
Perhaps for people with smaller hands than I ...! :)

My bike is new and the 2017 model seems to have more zip ties hidden in nearly inaccessible places than earlier years did. I'm finding it very difficult to unwind the electrical harness and cabling to the extent required ... some of the zip ties are very difficult to get my wire cutters onto and I can't imagine how I'm going to put them back after I get things set up the way I want with the tank in the way. :(

Thank you for your comments regardless. it seems there's a fragility issue with the connectors that I must keep in mind.
 

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Ramarren,

We didn't use the special tool. I do think it would be handy to have another person to help, if you could. Be sure to note Vince's suggestion on the vacuum lines, here's a copy&paste of his post:

"In fact, when you've removed the 4 bolts (rear and front), the tank doesn't move that much, not because of the fuel lines, but because of the 2 vacuum lines in the front. These 2 lines are difficult to disconnect because they are strongly tightened on the tank. To lift the tank easily, just free the 2 vacuum lines on all their mounting points on the frame. Then, they can come up with the tank and you can lift the tank to reach the electric plug and and the fuel lines. It becomes then easier to disconnect the fuel lines because you can access them with all your fingers and press on their mechanism to disconnect them."

Good luck, and be sure to let us know how it goes.

Sarah
Thank you, Sarah! I'll hunt down those two lines and see where they're anchored and how to release them properly.

One thing: I see in the PDF shop manual for the Scrambler that it says to unbolt the tank from the two rubber bushings at the front. I think that's an error ... Those bushings slide easily (especially if you apply a little lithium grease or Vaseline) into two channels on the frame so all you have to to do release the front of the tank is a) remove the two bolts at the rear, b) remove the upper shroud on the front of the tank, c) lift the rear and slide the tank forward an inch or so. At this point the tank lifts clear of the mounts and can be moved around, and you can get under the sides to do some things.

I'm at that point, but it still doesn't give me enough access to unthread and re-route the wiring harness bits and other cabling the way I prefer to. Perhaps loosening up the breather/vacuum line connections will free the tank up to move enough so that I don't have to un-do the fuel line and electrical connections. I'll look at it some more today. No rush! :D
 

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Hi Ramarren,
Recently I was changing the fuel tank, but I was worried that I would fail,
Did you finally take the tank off?
I'd like to know how you do it.
 

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Hi Ramarren,
Recently I was changing the fuel tank, but I was worried that I would fail,
Did you finally take the tank off?
I'd like to know how you do it.
I never did: I gave up, worked around the nonsense and got what I needed done. Then, as if in spite, the fuel connections just fell out of the pump and wouldn't relatch when I pushed them in until I swore and FORCED them back. Huge bruises up my arm to do that.

The Scrambler and I just didn't get along. In three months owning, wrenching, and trying to make it work the way it ought, it simply refused to be comfortable and inspire me to ride it. Even with the seat and bar update, etc etc, it was actually painful to ride more than thirty miles at a time. I only managed to put four hundred miles on it in all that time.

I traded the Scrambler for a Moto Guzzi V7III Racer about two weeks ago. The Racer works exactly the way I want a motorcycle to work, needs practically nothing at all, and I've already put 600+ miles on it. It is an absolute joy to ride, I can ride it all day long without even thinking about it.

“The biggest hindrance to learning is fear of showing one's self a fool.”
― William Least Heat-Moon, Blue Highways
 

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Sounds good,
Congratulations on finding the right motorcycle.
Hi Guys
I have the 2017 classic and I wanted to remove my tank but I noticed that I was getting confused after reading some of the posts and I thought I would just give it a try. The hardest part was the breather hoses at the front but I managed to take out the fuel hoses which took about 2 seconds. I used a flat head screwdriver to hold down the big washer (don't know what its called LOL) and simply pull out the middle fuel hose and it popped right out . No special tool needed
 
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