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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wanting to do a bunch of touring this coming summer. I'm wondering what other people have done to make that experience a bit more enjoyable?

I already have a Puig touring screen, and a RAM phone holder. I'm planning on grabbing some DrySpec bags, a fuel bottle, upgrading my front suspension, and rear shock. I'm assuming the front suspension and rear shock upgrades will make this a looooot smoother of a ride.
 

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My suggestion would be making sure after doing that lot, you ride the bike a lot. With lots of new stuff, something always goes wrong.

Sucks when that’s in the middle of a long trip!

When I do long trips on mine I use an airhawk seat pad. Modern version of a sheep skin, much easier on your butt.
 

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In this instance what is the definition of touring. Are we talking one night and a couple of hundred miles or a month in the saddle and two thousand miles?
Are you camping or staying in hotels/motels?
On or off road?
 

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Suspension ftw!! But not just because of touring, because it helps overall. The rest is personal preference and will change as you use it and determine what worked and what didn't. FWIW, I'm really enjoying my Mosko Moto Reckless 80 setup after using all kinds of bags and rigs over the years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm wanting to handle a week away from the house on the bike. I'd want to primarily stay on-road. I've got Angel GT tires, and that's where they'd like to stay. ;)

I'd like to spend a week either touring through various cities where my buddies live, or I'd like to ride from trailhead to trailhead. I'm already an ultralight backpacker, so I've got that part covered.

I ordered my DrySpec 20 bags. They should be here next week.
 

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Hi there. Didn't catch what you are riding so some of my comments may not be relevant. I have 1100 sport and did a month tour of South Island, New Zealand last March with my wife as a pillion. It was absolutely stunning! Few tips:

1. Planning is essential. On long trips if you have back to back full on riding days you don't have time to recover. So depending on your stamina and riding style, plan your days so that you get to enjoy the journey, not only chase that next stop every day.

What worked for me as well is multi day stays in some places along the way. It gives you a buffer if something slows you down and gives you extra resting/recovery time if driving conditions are tough (rain, etc).

Carry enough water (it is amazing how quickly you dihydrate while riding) and maybe some spare fuel if necessary.

2. I found my bike very comfortable for touring. I set the suspension (Ohlins front and back) for extra load. Standard seat was fine for up to 4hr of continuous riding in my experience, although I was wearing gel padded underwear for extra comfort. I am using standard pirelli mt60s which performed admirably in varying road and weather conditions.

3. If you do your laundry along the way (and I don't see why you wouldn't) and don't plan to camp I found a 40 litre dry bag was perfectly adequate for two of us. Obviously you have to pack carefully and don't get too carried away with destination clothes. Mind you this was a late summer ride so possibly need more clothes if you expect cooler weather along the way.

These days i only use 66 litre dry bag if I need to carry camping gear as well or plan to hike. My bike has only a rear Ventura rack so I didn't have issues with exhaust heat even with rubber dry bag i was using. For bikes with rear rack only i wouldn't use anything bigger than 66 litre by the way.

Check all the rack screws periodically! Bigger load and constant vibrations over days of riding can easily get the screws loose resulting in loss of luggage and possibly an accident if you have someone driving behind you.

4. Don't know where you are going but if there is a chance that it will rain, be very ready for wet conditions. That means testing water resistance (over extended period of time) of all your gear prior to your trip.

Riding becomes unpleasant in a hurry if you get wet, especially if you know that you have another wet day in front of you tomorrow. Check creases, seams for leaks and gaps in clothing coverage (eg pants/ boots).
Boots may be waterproof but if the water is going down the pants and finding the gap to get inside the boots you are in trouble.
It takes forever for boots to dry! And tomorrow is another day of riding...

5. Obviously pack basic tools as well as tire repair kit, ties, rope, spare straps, mini rear wheel stand, chain lube, waterproof torch, maybe spare chain (maybe not if your chain is in good condition).

I was also carying satelite emergency beacon just in case I get stuck or injured outside cellphone coverage. First aid kit is also a must with basic medication.

Other gadgets are matter of personal preference but whatever you carry make sure you also have a full power bank with you at all times..

I did over 4000kms and didn't have any issues with the bike not even a minor one - it was going like a dream.

At the end i will just repeat, plan carefully - fatigue is your biggest enemy both in terms of safety and being able to truly enjoy the experience. Hope all goes well for you, all the best on your travels.

Cheers, Aleksandar
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I got the DrySpec D20 bags; put them om; took them for a test drive. When I got home, I noticed one of them was rubbing slightly on the wheel as I turned corners. ....which made a hole. I've gotta repair this on my own as both Revzilla nor DrySpec could offer help. :(

No worries, I'm good with a sewing machine.

At the end of the day, they are nice bags, but maybe not for me and my ride style. I should have gone with either the DrySpec D28 or D38.

PS: I had zero issues with heat from my FT Termignoni exhaust.
 

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Try using mirror extenders to push the mirrors out a little wider. The Scrambler ones are pretty narrow and a lot of buffeting and noise comes from mirrors even though people blame screens first almost every time.
 

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I'm happy with the soft bags Blizzard XL from Enduristan. Click here .

This winter the seat gets thermoelastic foam and a new suspension front and rear, so the bike becomes more comfy on long camping tours. I'll post pics, when it's done in March.
 

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i did two 5K+ trips on m scrambler and just did a 7K trip on my FTR. i always use Sea to Summit Big River bags they have loops for Rok Straps. They typically cost about $40 and are bullet proof. Had some fall off a RZR and get drug for about 20 minutes with no puncture. I normally do 2 up on my luggage rack. a 35L base with a 20L topper if needed. In my 35L i normally pack 7 undies, 5-7 Merino wool socks, 4-5 Shirts, 2 Pants, 13in Laptop/Charger, Patagonia Nano Air Jacket (packs inside breast pocket) depending on weather. That will typically get me for a week. If i am camping along the route i have a Wolfman Beta Plus 45L duffle/saddlebag hybrid. That is more than big enough for my 2P tent(go 1 size up from number of people to fit anything else in tent), camp chair, a few packets of food, mess kit, 1L MSR fuel can for extra gas. There is normally still plenty of room, but after your first multi day trip you will get it dialed in and figure out less is more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Less is always more.

Would you be willing to post a picture of your 35L on your bike? I'm seeing it's 28" long, and I'm having a hard time conceptualizing what that looks like on our tiny bikes.
 
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