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Like the title says, if you want ideas to improve on the stock, under seat toolkit, have a look HERE.
 

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Wow, that's a neat kit you've made up. Thanks for the descriptions and explanations, too. Got a source for that mini ratchet? Thanks.

Sarah
 

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Discussion Starter #3

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Saw this thread pop up and was curious about this kit too, so I dug up the post on Archive.org:

Ducati Scrambler Toolkit - How To Make It Actually Useful
Way back in the stone-age, the purchase of a new motorcycle came with two important items, a proper center-stand and some quality tools.

The days of motorcycle manufacturers actually incorporating center-stands into their design have long passed, but most still make an attempt to supply some kind of rudimentary tool kit for roadside repairs.

Unfortunately, the quality of these kits is alarmingly bad, and they tend to leave out a great many items that would be useful to someone like myself, who travels long distances frequently.

In this post, I will show you how to modify the stock under seat toolkit supplied with the new Ducati Scrambler, into something that is actually useful. In the photo below you see the kit as it is supplied. It contains several tools, all made out of the finest Italian cheese…

43963


From left to right, they are as follows:
1) Shock Adjustment Spanner
2) Combination Screwdriver Blade
3) Spark Plug Wrench Rod
4) Metric Hex Keys
5) Fuse Puller
6) Screwdriver Handle
7) Shock Spanner Handle
8) Spark Plug Wrench

The incompleteness of this set is sure to leave you stranded on the side of the road, most of the time. The photo below shows the items that will be pitched into the nearest garbage can.

43964


As stated before, these are all manufactured from mozzarella cheese, with silver paint added for effect (with the exception of the black plastic driver handle, which may actually be harder than the supposed metal items).

We will be replacing these, and adding additional items, as shown in the next photo.

43965


Once again, from left to right:
1A) 1/4″ Driver Handle
2A) 1/4″ Extension
3A) 1/4″ Mini Ratchet Handle
4A) Properly Hardened Hex Keys (Short Arm with Ball Ends)
5A) 1/4″ Square Drive to Hex Adapter
6A) 1/4″ Drive - 8mm Socket
7A) Hex Bit to 1/4″ Drive Adapter
8A) 1/4″ Drive Wobble
9A) Phillips & Standard Screwdriver Bits
10A) TORX Bits
11A) Hex Bits
12A) Small Adjustable Crescent Wrench
13A) Wire Ties
14A) Electrical Tape

Along with packets of Brake Lubricant, Dielectric Grease, Oil Plug Sealant, Battery Grease & Hand Cleaner.

Take special notice of a couple of these items.

The Driver Handle has a 1/4″ square drive socket at the base of the handle, this enables it to do “double duty” as a hand driver or ratchet extension.

The 8mm socket is the only size necessary for this model, as all there are only a handful if non socket-head type fasteners used (most importantly the chain tension adjustment bolts), and they all are this size.

The Mini Ratchet’s stem fits nicely into the standard Spark Plug Wrench, for use as a handle to increase torque.

The Lubricants, Driver Handle & Crescent Wrench all fit into the small area under the seat located in front of the latching mechanism, along with a tire plug kit and some CO2 cartridges. Add in a small multi-tool and mini flashlight, and you are pretty much ready for just about anything.

The rest fit in the stock tool pouch which then fits - as designed - under the seat.

43967
 

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Saw this thread pop up and was curious about this kit too, so I dug up the post on Archive.org:

Ducati Scrambler Toolkit - How To Make It Actually Useful
Way back in the stone-age, the purchase of a new motorcycle came with two important items, a proper center-stand and some quality tools.

The days of motorcycle manufacturers actually incorporating center-stands into their design have long passed, but most still make an attempt to supply some kind of rudimentary tool kit for roadside repairs.

Unfortunately, the quality of these kits is alarmingly bad, and they tend to leave out a great many items that would be useful to someone like myself, who travels long distances frequently.

In this post, I will show you how to modify the stock under seat toolkit supplied with the new Ducati Scrambler, into something that is actually useful. In the photo below you see the kit as it is supplied. It contains several tools, all made out of the finest Italian cheese…

View attachment 43963

From left to right, they are as follows:
1) Shock Adjustment Spanner
2) Combination Screwdriver Blade
3) Spark Plug Wrench Rod
4) Metric Hex Keys
5) Fuse Puller
6) Screwdriver Handle
7) Shock Spanner Handle
8) Spark Plug Wrench

The incompleteness of this set is sure to leave you stranded on the side of the road, most of the time. The photo below shows the items that will be pitched into the nearest garbage can.

View attachment 43964

As stated before, these are all manufactured from mozzarella cheese, with silver paint added for effect (with the exception of the black plastic driver handle, which may actually be harder than the supposed metal items).

We will be replacing these, and adding additional items, as shown in the next photo.

View attachment 43965

Once again, from left to right:
1A) 1/4″ Driver Handle
2A) 1/4″ Extension
3A) 1/4″ Mini Ratchet Handle
4A) Properly Hardened Hex Keys (Short Arm with Ball Ends)
5A) 1/4″ Square Drive to Hex Adapter
6A) 1/4″ Drive - 8mm Socket
7A) Hex Bit to 1/4″ Drive Adapter
8A) 1/4″ Drive Wobble
9A) Phillips & Standard Screwdriver Bits
10A) TORX Bits
11A) Hex Bits
12A) Small Adjustable Crescent Wrench
13A) Wire Ties
14A) Electrical Tape

Along with packets of Brake Lubricant, Dielectric Grease, Oil Plug Sealant, Battery Grease & Hand Cleaner.

Take special notice of a couple of these items.

The Driver Handle has a 1/4″ square drive socket at the base of the handle, this enables it to do “double duty” as a hand driver or ratchet extension.

The 8mm socket is the only size necessary for this model, as all there are only a handful if non socket-head type fasteners used (most importantly the chain tension adjustment bolts), and they all are this size.

The Mini Ratchet’s stem fits nicely into the standard Spark Plug Wrench, for use as a handle to increase torque.

The Lubricants, Driver Handle & Crescent Wrench all fit into the small area under the seat located in front of the latching mechanism, along with a tire plug kit and some CO2 cartridges. Add in a small multi-tool and mini flashlight, and you are pretty much ready for just about anything.

The rest fit in the stock tool pouch which then fits - as designed - under the seat.

View attachment 43967
Bin the packets of whatever and replace with nitrile gloves. Why would you carry brake grease etc in an emergency toolkit ?
 

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I know this is an old thread but who actually uses the tool kit when out riding? I have been riding since 1972 and I can honestly say I have never needed to use a motorcycle stock tool kit on a ride on a street bike. Not one of the three motorcycle tool kits currently at home has ever actually been opened in a combined total of around 70,000 km. When I do work on a bike at home I use real tools.
 

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I know this is an old thread but who actually uses the tool kit when out riding? I have been riding since 1972 and I can honestly say I have never needed to use a motorcycle stock tool kit on a ride on a street bike. Not one of the three motorcycle tool kits currently at home has ever actually been opened in a combined total of around 70,000 km. When I do work on a bike at home I use real tools.
I would have to agree with you. Most times I've looked in one it's usually been to try and help someone else. For me, probably a nip up of a loose mirror or tweek the suspension etc. but not anything major. I do carry a puncture repair kit now after a friend used one which saved the day and I was quite impressed, alternative was recovery.
 

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I do carry a puncture repair kit now after a friend used one which saved the day and I was quite impressed, alternative was recovery.
Same here. Would not ride without a set of plugs, a small electric pump a reamer and some CO2 cartridges, also would not buy a road bike with tubed tyres these days. There is nothing really in a stock tool kit that is going to help fix a flat. Maybe manufacturers should add flat repair tools and do away with the other stuff.
 

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Manufacturers are probably hesitant to add tire repair tools due to liability if the repair fails. Just like w cars they officially recommend complete replacement.

In practice I’ve run my cars with multiple plugs in a single tire never fail.
 

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I use tyre slime in mine to prevent punctures, you just have to check the tyres for anything stuck in them every time you use it which is a good habit to get in to anyway. I am lucky enough to generate the odd spare spanner from work and cut down a 30mm ring spanner for rear wheel removal/chain adjustment. Got some sae 90 oil in one of those little spray tubs just to lube the chain, not the best stuff but far better than nothing at all. If you do some mileage take the extra you need as long as you are happy to use it, just what I've learnt in 40 years of riding.
 

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What tool manufacturers do we recommend for this type of thing?
 
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